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Jaime Brockett

Updated on January 30, 2012

Folksinger Jaime Brockett

Learn more about entertainer Jaime Brockett.

Jaime Brockett (pronounced "Jamie") is a memorable and uniquely stylish New England folksinger. As the Boston Globe described him, Jaime is a "hard-core, unregenerated folkie."

His popularity soared, as a recording artist and performer, starting in the 1960s, when his version of Legend of the U.S.S. Titanic became an overnight classic. Despite the song's length -- over three minutes, an extraordinarily long recording for that era -- radio stations made time to play it anyway.

Into the 21st century, Jaime continues to entertain audiences -- many of whom will drive long distances for any Jaime Brockett concert or performance -- with his dry wit, clever observations on life, and his consistently rich music. (Rumors of where Jaime is and what he's doing, surface infrequently at Yahoo Group created by Jaime's fans.)

Skilled in many of the musical instruments he collects, Jaime may be best known for his talents with guitar, banjo and dulcimer, but he can eke a sweet sound out of almost any string instrument.

Jaime Brockett may not be a household name, but to those who've had the pleasure of hearing his music -- live or recorded -- Jaime's an instant legend.

A brief bio: Jaime Brockett

Jaime Brockett grew up in Grafton and Westboro, Massachusetts. In 1969, he achieved almost instant fame with "The Legend of the U.S.S. Titanic." That popular song is Jamie's rambling, 13-minute version of a Leadbelly classic, co-written with Chris Smither.

Today, Jaime lives in a picturesque corner of New England, collects vintage guitars, and nods at armadillos as he passes them en route his next concert.

Jaime has always filled his movie (aka, his life) with adventures, great music, witty dialogue, and clever observations. He sees his life through sunny yellow lenses as he roams from one coffeehouse or club (and grateful audience) to the next.

Jaime is well-respected as a musician since he made his mark on folk music in the late 1960s. His first album, Remember the Wind and the Rain, attracted loyal fans who -- more than 30 years later -- sometimes drive hundreds of miles for one of Jaime's performances.

Jaime's other albums include: Jaime Brockett 2 - 1970 (Capitol Records), North Mountain Velvet - 1977 (Adelphi Records), and Road Dancer - 1996, (Private release).

Jaime's music has evolved far beyond "The Legend of the U.S.S. Titanic." In his 21st century performances, Jaime's original observations are as appreciated as his songs.

Jaime Brockett is a folk music icon, an entertainer on- and offstage, and he's still legendary for his sizzling, pan-fried steaks.

Jaime Brockett's albums on Amazon.com

Remember the Wind and the Rain
Remember the Wind and the Rain

The original recording and still among the best of the 1960's folk music scene. I'm pretty sure the cover photo was by Linda Eastman, who later married Paul McCartney... but I could be wrong about that.

 

Vote for your favorite Jaime Brockett album

Remember the Wind & the Rain
Remember the Wind & the Rain

Boston folkie Jaime Brockett became an underground radio sensation with his epic ballad 'Legend of the U.S.S. Titanic', which updated the old Leadbelly song about how black prizefighter Jack Johnson had been denied passage on the Titanic because of his race to offer an, er, alternative explanation as to why the ocean liner sank (the captain and first mate were high from smoking hemp rope)! Now, we dont want to accuse our customers of illegal activities, but apparently a fair minority were at the...

 
North Mountain Velvet
North Mountain Velvet

Boston folkie Jaime Brockett became an underground radio sensation with his epic ballad 'Legend of the U.S.S. Titanic', which updated the old Leadbelly song about how black prizefighter Jack Johnson had been denied passage on the Titanic because of his race to offer an, er, alternative explanation as to why the ocean liner sank (the captain and first mate were high from smoking hemp rope)! Now, we dont want to accuse our customers of illegal activities, but apparently a fair minority were at the...

 

My Jaime Brockett memories

I met Jaime in 1969, when he performed at Colby-Sawyer College, then called Colby Junior College (New London, NH). I was a freshman, working backstage in the theatre department.

Jaime was among my idols, and I'd practically worn out my copy of his first album. So, my expectations were very high when I heard he'd be in concert at my college.

However, Jaime's cover photo on the album had made almost as great an impression on me as his music. Since Jaime was tall enough to almost fill the doorway in that photo, I figured he was at least six feet tall. Since I'm taller than most women, height was important to me in those days.

According to friends, I'd be a terrible poker player, because -- when Jaime arrived for his concert at Colby -- they say that my face fell a few hundred feet. Jaime was approximately the same height as me. Instantly, I viewed him as "just another performer." In retrospect, I think I was flat-out rude to him.

However, Jaime's charm, persistence, and lots of phone calls gradually won me over.

We dated briefly, when he was living in a winter rental in Hampton Beach, NH. I remember his prank calls to radio DJs he knew. Of course, those calls were always while the DJs were on the air. Jaime had a twinkle in his eye and a relentlessly mischievous sense of humor. One DJ was not amused, but the rest seemed to take the calls in stride or even enjoy them.

Later, after I left college and moved to Boston, I continued to see Jaime. One night, when his friend J. Geils was performing in a free concert at Boston Common, Jaime and I were among the few who stood in the pouring rain to hear the music... until Jaime convinced J that the prospect of electrocution suggested ending the concert early.

What I remember about that -- and other musicians Jaime introduced me to -- was the close bond among those who really respected the music. It wasn't about electric vs. acoustical... it was simply about the sound and the skill of the musicians.

I also recall a funky little hamburger joint in Back Bay Boston, where the burgers were juicy and delicious and ridiculously inexpensive. (Local rumors claimed it was a money laundering shop.) Jaime and I ate there several times, after he parked his VW van in a no-parking zone and shoved several parking tickets under the windshield wiper.

Every time I saw Jaime, I knew I was in for a colorful adventure. Just thinking of those days, I'm smiling. It was a different time, a different place, and a whole lot of fun.

Jaime and I drifted apart, gradually and amiably. There were no fights... he was just on the road most of the time, and my life took me in a different direction.

In the early 1990s, I saw Jaime at the Press Room in Portsmouth, NH. If Jaime recognized me, he didn't say so. That may have been his nod to discretion, as I was with my husband. (To be fair, I was probably one of many slender young women whose eye Jaime caught in a more casual era, and by the 1990s, I didn't look much like that girl.)

Jaime's music was as sweet as ever, and his banter and stories between sets... well, they were 100% pure and original Jaime Brockett.

I've seen mention of his New England home -- a different location from where I recall him buying a house in the 1970s -- but I'm not sure where he is now. In my mind, he's somewhere on the road, entertaining and delighting audiences who don't expect so much talent from such an understated guy.

Jaime Brockett is a unique and talented musician, and those of us who've heard him perform will always smile at the mention of his name.

Have you seen Jaime Brockett? - Tell us when and where!

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      Brook Trout 2 years ago

      I saw Jaime Brockett at Nathaniel Hawthorne college in NH in the early 1970s. The library hall has not even half full-too bad. Jaime did not play the USS Titanic song although he had many requests. He played a full concert but the show was weak. The croud was small and the atmosphere was low. If the place was full and roudy, Jamie would have had a good time and maybe played the USS Titanic song for us.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      1987 the rub a dub pub. sold him my old split bamboo fishing rod. saw him perform at said place. but knowing jamie and seeing him in action shooting pool or dealing cards partying womanizing i wonder how he found the time to play music. I love his music.remember lynne and DB . i

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @ElizabethBennet1: Well done Elizabeth!! What a good idea to keep such a legendary figure alive and well. All of us have stories and those which included Jamie definitely became part of my university romp days and fun memories. I have much to be thankful for knowing that this part of my life was well defined by my love of music, those who make it and respecting the life they must lead to share their talents. Thanks for what you do, maybe in the six degrees of separation somewhere Jamie will see the work you have accomplished and the stories you have gathered to give him a bit of a chuckle knowing how much we all love him. regards

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      ElizabethBennet1 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I have no contact with Jaime. I haven't seen him in years, and don't know how to contact him. I'm probably around your age, and I created this fan page a few years ago, for fun.

      Almost all Squidoo lenses (pages) -- like this one -- are created by people like me. We aren't staff, and most of us do this for fun, not to earn anything from our work. Basically, Squidoo is a huge collection of lenses created by people who are enthusiastic about whatever topics they've chosen to write about.

      It's very much a spare-time kind of thing.

      I have fond memories of Jaime, and few people seemed to be talking about him, online. So, I created this lens.

      I hope that helps, and I wish you good luck in contacting Jaime. If you do find him, let him know about this lens. He'd probably be amused.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @ElizabethBennet1: Thanks for posting my encounter with Jamie. Hopefully he remembers, I would love to hear from him if you have contact with him. Or, are you a fan page only? regards, Judith

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      ElizabethBennet1 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Judith, I apologize for not approving your comment right away. Usually, I take weekends (at least Sundays) off.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Will I get to see my comment posted here. I posted August 26th, 2012. Thank you.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I met Jamie when I was an under grad at Simon Fraser University Burnaby, B.C. late 60's. He played to a full house in the SFU theatre. My girlfriend and I went backstage to introduce ourselves. We all clicked. He invited us to his show that evening at the Vancouver Coliseum. He put the flower I gave him on the neck of his guitar when he played, I knew I wanted to be with him. We spent the night together. Young, impulsive and daring myself, I stayed out all night. It was simple. We lay on the bed and talked about the music industry, his popularity and his love for the guitar and dulcimer. Nothing more, nothing less. The next morning we headed to the airport, he missed his flight. He invited my girlfriend and I along with his manager to drive to Seattle with them and return the rental car to Vancouver. We agreed. I just needed to have a few more hours with this incredible man. I know it was an impetuous thing to do, but I loved every minute of it. 'Remember the Wind and the Rain' is a favorite song. Jamie e told me the story which created it. Gotta love him! If you read this Jaime I hope you remember our brief encounter.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Brockett played a gig with old friend and fellow road legend Paul Geremia in Somerville, MA in April. I wasn't there, alas, but heard it was an awesome show.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I remember seeing Jamie back in the late 60's in Cambridge, Ma. Remember The Wind And The Rain is as haunting and beautiful now as then. It was a special song for myself and a lady I loved. I had the chance to speak to him briefly a couple of times. I would give anything to see him live again.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Yea. First Heard This (ballad of the titanic) On Beeker Street In 1972. I Gotta' Tel Ya' Folk's, This Tune And Beeker Street Are 2 Absolute Classics. My Pal's & I Would Make Sure We We Were Drivin' Round The Country Around 11:00 P.M. To Catch The Intro To Clear Channel 1090 KAAY Beeker Street. 50,000 Watt's That Could Be Heard Into Canada & Down To The Gulf Of Mexico. It Was Always Fading In And Out Which Made It Even More Cool, Considering We Were All Smokin' Weed & Doin' LSD Or Mescaline. But It Took Me Years To Find A Copy Of This Classic Tune. I Just Listened To It Again On My Com-Pooter & It Still Makes Me Laugh. That's Why I'm Here. Late 60's , Early 70's ... Some Good Times. Dig It. Yea, I'm 55 Years Old. Wish I Could Go Back There Again. :)

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Daniel,

      You and I must be about the same age. I to used to listen to AM radio, KAAY, late night. It's the first place I heard Brockett, and the Guess Who song. A couple of years back I purchased the Guess Who CD, as well as Brockett's now available CD of Remember the Wind and the Rain. Looking forward to CD's of the other two. I do have all three of his alblums, framed and on the wall in my office.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      I have been a fan of jaime brockett since first hearing his first album in 1969. i had the great pleasure of seeing him live in a club called "godfrey daniels" in bethlehem, pa. in the early 1990s. it is still a great memory.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      1968 drove my '63 beater VW way out west of Chicago to pick-up KAAY Little Rock station, Beeker Street.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: KAAY Little Rock. Beeker Street. Brings back memories. Back in '68 had to drive my old beat-up '63 VW out to DuPage Airport in St. Charles, IL just to pick-up that AM radio station.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      Jamie and a girl (wish I could remember her name) gave me a ride outside of Boulder, CO back in the mid 1970s. I was 16 or 17 years old and hitchhiking west. A few miles into the ride Jamie asked if I was in a hurry, I wasn't so he stopped by a small river to do a little fishing. I had a guitar with me, he said, Why don't you play us a tune? I think I played a couple of Mississippi John Hurt songs. They were on their way to a small mountain town where some friends lived to hang out and play music, Jamie asked me if I wanted to go with them, but foolishly I said no. Walking back to his truck he nodded toward the girl and said "I'm gonna to marry her some day".

      I wonder if he did.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      I used to go see Jaime every chance I could at the Main Point in Bryn Mawr, Pa. I have some really good pictures of him somewhere that I took while he was performing. With his permission of course! Iwould really enjoy seeing him again and let my kids see a really gracious and talented entertainer.I hope he is well and enjoying life. best of luck to him.

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      anonymous 8 years ago

      I use to listen to the Mighty 1090 KAAY Little Rock with Clyde Clifford, and Beeker Street. I Love this song, such geo-political satire. Great. I would listen to the Guess Who, and Clyde would play Friends of Mine off of their Wheatfield Soul album 1968, my Jr. year in high school, and such a cultural awakening for this midwest, sheltered, person.