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Newsgalatta

Updated on March 29, 2016
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thozha movie review

When this Telugu-Tamil bilingual film was announced, it was known that the film would be a remake of the 2011 French dramedy The Intouchables, directed by Olivier Nakache and Éric Toledano. How director Vamshi Paidipally would make the film suit local sensibilities was the big question. The story revolves around two men— Vikram Aditya (Nagarjuna), a paraplegic billionaire who has everything in the world but no family and Seenu (Karthi), man who is up to no good and has nothing but his estranged family. Tamannaah plays Vikram’s secretary in the film. They hire Seenu as Vikram’s caretaker. It’s evident that Vikram and Seenu have nothing in common but how they form a bond and how their relationship evolves forms the rest of the story.


When was the last time you saw a Tamil/Telugu remake and didn't whine about how badly the maker has spoiled the original? After watching this Nagarjuna-starrer, you might not have such complaints. Many Indian remakes of foreign films fail because the makers, in an attempt to mould the script to suit their audience, make odd changes that lead to shoddy output. But Oopiri, a remake of the French film The Intouchables, crosses that hurdle with ease. Actually, the changes Vamsi has made to the original script are only going to reinforce the success of Oopiri.

The film follows the story of a friendship between a quadriplegic billionaire Vikramaditya and his caretaker Seenu, a slumdog. Both the characters have their own share of problems and they find solace in each other. Vikram (Nagarjuna), a billionaire, becomes an invalid after a paragliding accident and he is sick of people's compassion towards him, and that makes him hire Seenu, who gives a damn about pity, as his caretaker. And thus unravels a decent, feel-good drama.

One of the major differences between the original and Oopiri is, of course, Tamannaah, who plays the role of Keerthi, a personal secretary of Vikram. The romance track between her and Seenu is a speed bump to the story; nevertheless, even it has a few good moments to cherish. But another addition to the story: Anushka, Vikram's ex-lover, is just an unwanted baggage.

Kudos to Vamsi for handling the sentiment quotient with care. He has made sure that scenes don't become tearjerkers and his tactic to end every emotional scene with Seenu's wisecracks has saved the film from being cliched. One of the best examples of this stratagem is the scene where Seenu, who leaves the job to take care of his family, pays a visit to Vikram. And Vikram, who becomes heartbroken after Seenu's absence, is pale with a bushy beard. The background score is sad and we expect Seenu to be shocked and shed a few tears, but he laughs his heart out and mocks Vikram for turning into a Devdas. This is simply brilliant.

Karthi scores a home run in each and every scene with his splendid performance. He eases himself into the shoes of Seenu, and it looks like being heedless is something that comes easily to him. He manages to keep the audience in splits throughout the film. And all of his jokes work. On the other hand, Nagarjuna should be given a pat on the back just for accepting a role like this one. As an invalid, he can only emote with his face, but for Nagarjuna, it is more than enough to infuse feeling into his character.

A special mention goes to cinematographer PS Vinod. The Intouchables has a blue tone throughout the film, which sort of makes the film serious and gloomy. But in Oopiri, everything shines. Each and every frame of the film is rich and elegant, which gives a different appeal to the film and it has made the film more...err...Indian.

Zero Movie Review

'You're so easy to love' reads a wall hanging in the apartment of Bala and Priya, the leads of Zero. It is a killer in-joke in a film that deals with the trauma that follows for these two characters who do not have any idea of what is about to happen because of their romance. He is a social worker with a successful lawyer for a father. She is an orphan. They have married against the wishes of his father, who has a valid reason for his reservations about this match. Priya's long-dead mother, Devi had become mentally unstable during her pregnancy to such an extent that even her husband had to leave her. Bala's father is apprehensive that Priya, too, might become crazy.

If anything, debutant director Shiv Mohaa is ambitious. He could very easily have turned this construct into a horror film, but he reaches for more. He spins out a Biblical fantasy that starts at the very beginning — the birth of the universe, and races towards a situation that could destroy the balance in the universe.

The director keeps things very much ambiguous in the first half. Even though we see that Bala (Ashwin Kakumanu) and Priya (Sshivada) are clearly in love with each other, we can sense that things are off-kilter. Bala keeps running into Solomon (JD Chakravarthy), who speaks to thin air but maintains that he is speaking to his dead wife Andrea. Priya turns real nasty when she is called a thief in a store. She sleepwalks. She hears noises. She gets visions. Of a white serpent. Of her mother taking her into another world, a world that has white women roaming about in a daze. Is it the loneliness at home (she is a university rank holder who says she is content being at home) that is playing a trick on her? Is she imagining these things because she has read her dead mother's diaries and is influenced by those writings? Is she really becoming mentally unstable like her mother, just as Bala's father feared?

Even though we are soon told that the answer is none of the above, for a while, these thoughts stop us from predicting what might happen next. Zero is certainly that rare film where the audience is unsure where it will go next. The weirdness in the scenes are, at times, spine-chilling. Like in the scene where Priya is seen talking to Bala and the doorbell rings and she opens the door to find Bala standing there! The scene turns even more bizarre when she finds herself seeing four to five figures who all look like Bala. And when the phone rings, guess who it is on the other line!

The filmmaking in these portions is also solid. The film has a surprisingly large number of tight close-up shots and these superbly convey the helplessness of the two characters. The actors are perfect. Ashwin Kakumanu's low-key performance acts as a superb counterpoint to Sshivada's intense turn. The latter is a role that demands a real actress and we can see why the director chose this under-appreciated actress and not a star. She is excellent and shifts her expression from sheer terror to apprehension to vulnerability in a few seconds and sometimes all at once. Even Ravi Raghavendra and Thulasi are perfectly cast.

It is only in the second half that Zero's minuses become evident. Once we realise that there is a supernatural element at work, the film loses out on suspense. And while Shiv Mohaa's script actually clearly delineates the events that happen, we somehow begin to get the feeling that things are getting too messy and complicated. Even Solomon's character, which is built up quite a bit as an intriguing one, turns into something of a routine.

And once the fantasy element starts to take over the plot, the events, involving a likely end of the world due to a demonic force, feel somewhat similar to that of the underrated 2014 horror film Ra. While that film was bold enough to end on a nihilistic note, Zero sticks to its romantic outlook. Somehow, the latter view doesn't feel satisfying. But most importantly, as the ambition of the plot keeps getting bigger and bi

'You're so easy to love' reads a wall hanging in the apartment of Bala and Priya, the leads of Zero. It is a killer in-joke in a film that deals with the trauma that follows for these two characters who do not have any idea of what is about to happen because of their romance. He is a social worker with a successful lawyer for a father. She is an orphan. They have married against the wishes of his father, who has a valid reason for his reservations about this match. Priya's long-dead mother, Devi had become mentally unstable during her pregnancy to such an extent that even her husband had to leave her. Bala's father is apprehensive that Priya, too, might become crazy.


If anything, debutant director Shiv Mohaa is ambitious. He could very easily have turned this construct into a horror film, but he reaches for more. He spins out a Biblical fantasy that starts at the very beginning — the birth of the universe, and races towards a situation that could destroy the balance in the universe.


The director keeps things very much ambiguous in the first half. Even though we see that Bala (Ashwin Kakumanu) and Priya (Sshivada) are clearly in love with each other, we can sense that things are off-kilter. Bala keeps running into Solomon (JD Chakravarthy), who speaks to thin air but maintains that he is speaking to his dead wife Andrea. Priya turns real nasty when she is called a thief in a store. She sleepwalks. She hears noises. She gets visions. Of a white serpent. Of her mother taking her into another world, a world that has white women roaming about in a daze. Is it the loneliness at home (she is a university rank holder who says she is content being at home) that is playing a trick on her? Is she imagining these things because she has read her dead mother's diaries and is influenced by those writings? Is she really becoming mentally unstable like her mother, just as Bala's father feared?


Even though we are soon told that the answer is none of the above, for a while, these thoughts stop us from predicting what might happen next. Zero is certainly that rare film where the audience is unsure where it will go next. The weirdness in the scenes are, at times, spine-chilling. Like in the scene where Priya is seen talking to Bala and the doorbell rings and she opens the door to find Bala standing there! The scene turns even more bizarre when she finds herself seeing four to five figures who all look like Bala. And when the phone rings, guess who it is on the other line!


The filmmaking in these portions is also solid. The film has a surprisingly large number of tight close-up shots and these superbly convey the helplessness of the two characters. The actors are perfect. Ashwin Kakumanu's low-key performance acts as a superb counterpoint to Sshivada's intense turn. The latter is a role that demands a real actress and we can see why the director chose this under-appreciated actress and not a star. She is excellent and shifts her expression from sheer terror to apprehension to vulnerability in a few seconds and sometimes all at once. Even Ravi Raghavendra and Thulasi are perfectly cast.


It is only in the second half that Zero's minuses become evident. Once we realise that there is a supernatural element at work, the film loses out on suspense. And while Shiv Mohaa's script actually clearly delineates the events that happen, we somehow begin to get the feeling that things are getting too messy and complicated. Even Solomon's character, which is built up quite a bit as an intriguing one, turns into something of a routine.


And once the fantasy element starts to take over the plot, the events, involving a likely end of the world due to a demonic force, feel somewhat similar to that of the underrated 2014 horror film Ra. While that film was bold enough to end on a nihilistic note, Zero sticks to its romantic outlook. Somehow, the latter view doesn't feel satisfying. But most importantly, as the ambition of the plot keeps getting bigger and bigger, the film struggles to match up to it visually. By the time the film ends, we begin to feel that this story might have worked even better as a novel. Perhaps, we all have our own versions of God, Satan, Adam, Eve and Lilith in our heads that whatever that we see on a large screen might not be as impressive.

gger, the film struggles to match up to it visually. By the time the film ends, we begin to feel that this story might have worked even better as a novel. Perhaps, we all have our own versions of God, Satan, Adam, Eve and Lilith in our heads that whatever that we see on a large screen might not be as impressive.

Pichaikkaran Movie Review

Apart from producing the Tamil movie on his home banner of Vijay Antony Film Corporation, the actor has composed the music for "Pichaikkaran," which has Satna Titus, Bagavathi Perumal and others in the cast. The flick has Prasanna Kumar's cinematography and Veera Senthil Raj's editing.

There is a good buzz around "Pichaikkaran" after the trailer of the film won a lot of appreciation from the viewers. Vijay Anthony's look garnered positive revenue and people praised him for taking up new challenges film after film.

The songs of the movie have also impressed the viewers and "Nenjorathil" and "Glamour Song" tracks have become popular among youths.

The music director-turned-actor's previous films like "Naan" and "Salim" were decent hits. All these factors have made the audience keep high hopes on his latest movie "Pichaikkaran," which is releasing in over 250 screens in Tamil Nadu and clashing with "Pokkiri Raja" and "Sowkarpettai."

The Tamil movie does not talk about beggars rather narrates the life story of a rich man, who turns poor due to circumstances. Multimillionaire Arul (Vijay Anthony) returns to his native to take over the reins of family business from his mother. Unfortunately, his mom meets with an accident and goes into coma. The only son now wants to save her and a spiritual guru tells him to turn beggar for 48 days if he wants his mother to recover. What happens next is the interesting part of the story.


There are no words to tell about Vijay Antony’s performance because he acted well and Satan Titus also showed here best performance. Rest of the actors also did a good job up to their marks.

However, by seeing all these elements the film will definitely get huge success at the box-office. All film lovers are also giving a positive response to the film and appreciating Vijay performance.

Pichaikaran complete story, Pichaikkaran review and Pichaikkaran collections will be updated soon here. Stay tuned..

Vijay Antony’s Pichaikkaran is the most-awaited Action-Thriller Tamil fiilm released on March 4th, 2016. Santa Titus is the lead Actress in the film. This Movie is written and directed by Sasi. Screenplay for the film is also done by Sasi. Prasanna Kumar is the cinematographer and edited by Veera Senthil Raj. Pichaikkaran is produced under the production company Vijay Antony Film Corporation and distributed all over by KR films and Skylark Entertainment. The run time of the film being 130 Minutes.

Pichaikkaran is a story of a rich man who will be forced to become a beggar due to some circumstances. The role of the rich man is played by Vijay Antony. Satna Titus played the female lead role in this action thriller movie. Apart from the lead roles, the movie has John Kennedy and Bagavathi Perumal in supportive roles. What made the rich man leave his pleasures and start begging and how did the heroine and all the other characters have entered his life and how did they affect the hero’s life is all that is to be watched in the theaters.The movie is presented by Vijay Antony’s home production. Vijay Antony has worked with the movie as the hero, musician, producer. The theatrical trailer that was released few days back has gained critical acclaims. On the other hand, the music is provided by the hero which had to face some issues and finally got released after resolving all the issues. Go through the Pichaikkaran Tamil Movie Review that we are providing in detail right on this page.


All the Tamil movie lovers who are interested in watching the movie this weekend should go through the cast and the technicians who worked in making this movie.

  • Production Company: Vijay Antony Film Corporation
  • Director: Sasi
  • Producer: Fathima Vijay Antony
  • Script Writer: Sasi
  • Music Director: Vijay Antony
  • Screenplay: Sasi
  • Director of Photography: Prasanna S Kumar
  • Editor: Veera Senthil Raj
  • Male lead: Vijay Antony
  • Female Lead: Satna Titus
  • Character Artists: John Kennedy and Bagavathi Perumal
  • Language: Tamil
  • Genre: Action, Thriller
  • Movie Duration: 130 minutes
  • Censor Certificate: ‘U’ certificate
  • Movie Release Date: 04th March 2016

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