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The Oldfield family

Updated on August 7, 2012

Three great musicians from the same family

The Oldfield family realy give us something... three grat musicians. You probably know Mike Oldfield, but his brother Terry and sister Sally are great too... For my opinion is Terry one of the best instrumental artists, becouse his songs take you to many places....you must just close your eyes and enyoy his journey... my favorit song is Footprints of Buddha's Children... you can realy feel life in Tibet... soooo nice.... I will introduce some of his music today and than i will continue with Mike and Sally...)

There is something thatt he told about his self:

''I take my inspiration from the cultures of the world and the beauty of nature expressing myself through flutes and other instruments. It is my heartfelt wish that this music assists you in experiencing peace in your life.''

Footprints of Buddha's Children - Terry Oldfield

Terry Oldfield on Amazon

Terry Oldfield - Autobiography

I was born to an Irish mother and an English father in a Northern suburb of London called Palmers Green. I have absolutely no memory of anything before an incident on a frosty morning when my older sister Sally and I were playing in the garden of a tall house and were confronted by a large white dog. We decided that this dog was Jack Frost, a character apparently well-known at the time in childrens' stories. There are happenings that I have been told about my childhood that are not really true memories for me although I suppose they too are stored away there somewhere, locked away in the vaults for some unconscious purpose. Then there are other snippets here and there; quite a few based around frequent visits to Margate, a seaside town in Kent where my grandparents on my father's side had retired to live. These were happy days with endless days on the beach collecting shells and building sand castles. I particularly remember the awesome expanses of black seaweed amongst which the two of us would wander in search of crabs and things. This was a world that I lost at some forgotten point in time or rather it was swept away in the rising tide of complexity that we call 'growing up.'

I think I was fairly happily immersed in life by the time I was 12 years old and it came as a tremendous shock to suddenly find myself sent away from my friends and family to board at what can only be described as an open prison. It was actually a Public School and this was to be the bane of my life for the next four years. I was so unhappy that all my writing books were full of days crossed off, as each one laid the way open to a future when I would be free. This freedom was called the School Holidays. To this day I cannot for the life of me see how my frequent cries for help were never heard. Each time I ran away from school I was taken back in disgrace as though I had made some dreadful error of judgment. There were of course some there who were perfectly happy to be controlled and herded about like sheep but I could never understand them. Anyway eventually someone got the message and I was given my freedom.

To break free from the conventions that society had placed upon me in the way of habitual responses and patterns of behavior, has been my aim ever since I read a book called The Hidden Side Of Things when I was about 16 years old. I was brought up in a pseudo-religious environment of ritual and mimicry that became the launching pad for my effort to break free in that it provided me with the necessary level of unease to set me moving upon the path in a search for liberation from the 'Mind-Forged Manacles' that are the source of all suffering in this world.

There was a fun period when my brother Mike and myself started a band called Barefoot. I enjoyed the atmosphere of that a lot. We played quite heavy stuff in various clubs but I couldn't play the guitar for toffee! Mike later went on to become a megastar.

Traveling was my saving grace as it led me to experience the great diversity of life on this planet. It was during a stay on the island of Hydra in Greece that I discovered the flute for the first time. I also drifted into Australia when I was 19 and so began a relationship with the place that has finally drawn me to live and work there down under.

Religion for me as a child was just another tedious subject at school, one that had a rather boring practical side, keeping me away from the important things like football and fishing. It was only when I came up against some of the unanswerable questions in life that the "Spiritual" quest began. I think all religion is an attempt to explain the mystery that is life. The rational mind (the problem solver) -ego- cannot bear the inexplicable. I have read all the books - mystical, practical, esoteric, etc. and done a good many courses, retreats, etc. and it has always slowly but surely led me back time and again to this point, this living moment in time that contains the eternal that these religions profess to seek.

Writing and playing music is a wonderful tool for me. It brings the whole maelstrom of thinking to a halt. I'm sure any artist would say the same, that the creative process is so rewarding in this way - that it reconnects or puts the creator in touch with himself, with that inexhaustible flow of energy and power that is always there, but only in this present moment, which is eternity unfolding. To that extent being creative, writing music for me, is simply making myself available to that which is, and then it all happens by itself or through me. That's why the question that always comes up is "How do you write music?" and it is impossible to answer because I simply don't know. It can only happen when I (thought) am no longer there to get in the way.

I don't think much about the audience until the work is finished and out there. It certainly isn't an altruistic thing - more a question of having to do it - mostly because of the focus - an edge to life that it gives. That feeling is addictive and I find life difficult and less meaningful if I can't work. I have heard other artists say the same - not only musicians. I feel it is an energy - flow thing. I often wonder whether I would still write music if nobody ever listened. There is also the mundane side - after all, for me music is also a product that I hope will be popular and sell. The audience is essential for that. But it never enters the creative process.

When I first started playing the flute on the Island of Hydra when I was 19 I used to go up into the forest and sit for hours just exploring the notes and finding my way around the instrument whilst listening to the wind in the pines and the birdsong and silence in between. I had some Greek friends there who took me to the remains of some of the old temples and theatres that stand there serenely in the ancient landscape. I played my flute there amongst the rocks and trees feeling the energy of the places and expressing my feelings through the magical transformation of breath into music.I had been sad and withdrawn through my teenage years and had set off travelling in order to find some sort of meaning in my life and it was through the flute and my connection with the energies of this ancient Greek world that my own energies began to flow again.

When I start work on a piece there is always the feeling that I can't do it. It seems an impossible task to create something from nothing but over the years I have learned to let this feeling be there whilst making myself available to the muse by improvising on some instrument or other (usually the flute which is my greatest love). If nothing happens then I might go and do something completely different. This seems to allow the unconscious room to work and usually when I come back there is a tune or something there and I know then that it will soon blossom into a song or instrumental.

Each year I go away on a 10 day Vipassana retreat and I also meditate for an hour in the morning and evening .

For many years I lived with the view that there was something to be gained by leaving the physical and entering into some kind of extrasensory realm where lay all that could be deemed to be spiritual. Now I feel the spirit deep within my bones and the connection with this marvelous Earth is feeding my soul and bringing me the inspiration to play from the heart and connect with the hearts of others. When I disappear and become like the open tube of the flute through which the wind blow it is then that the magic happens. The less I am the the more powerful is the sharing with those who recognise themselves in the magical vibration of music.

Source: http://www.terryoldfield.com/

Terry's discography

1986-.Cascade

1986-.Reverence

1987-.In the Presence of Light

1988-.Resonance

1989-.Star.of.Heaven

1990-.Angel.-.Metaphysical.Music

1990-.Spirit.of.the.Rainforest

1991-.Zen - The Search for Enlightenment

1992-.Illumination - A Celtic Blessing

1992-.Spiral Waves

1993-.Out.of.the.Depths.(De.Profundis)

1993-.Spirit of Africa

1994-.Australia - Twilight of the Dreamtime

1994-.Spirit of Tibet - 320

1995-.Icon

1996-.Earth Spirit

1996-.Spirit Of India

1999-.All.the.Rivers.Gold

2000-.Across The Universe

2000-.Spirit of The World

2001-.In The Presence of Light (Remastered)

2001-.Reflections - Best Of

2001-.Salmon Of A Lifetime

2002-.Australia, Waking the Spirit

2002-.Turning.Point

2003-.A.Time.for.Peace

2004-.Celt

2004-.Yoga Harmony

2005-.Ethereal

2005-.Out of the Depths vol-2

2006-.Om.Medwyn.Goodall.&.

2006-.Reiki Harmony - 320

2007-.Forever One

2007-.Labyrinth

2008-.Circle of Chant

2008-.Making Tracks

The March of a Thousand Days

Banquet on the water - Sally and Mike Oldfield

Before i will introduce you Terry's sister Sally and brother Mike let me show one song... it's so beautiful, but don't turn off your spikers in the begining, because it's a little bit weard... if you will, you'll miss one realy beautiful song.

Children of the Sun is the 1969 album by British folk duo The Sallyangie; Mike and Sally Oldfield.

Sally Oldfield

Biography

Sally Oldfield began singing and writing songs very suddenly at the age of 20 when she was studying English Literature and Philosophy at University. She had always loved solitude, poetry and wandering in Nature from early childhood, but a sudden and powerful mystical revelation that she experienced in February 1968 changed her life forever.

As well as a profound sense of wonder at the sacredness and inter-connectedness of all things, it opened up an inner world of strange mythologies and mystical landscapes which initially she found hard to integrate into any existing framework. She experimented with her first foray into music, the album "Children of the Sun", released under the name "The Sallyangie" -with the help of her gifted brother Mike,then 15 years old, and then spent several years searching for a musical style that could accomodate her artistic vision. She eventually found this with the compostion of her debut album "Water-Bearer" with its continuous musical structure and mystical themes.

There soon followed a world-wide hit single - "Mirrors" in 1978 - with its exotic Hawaiian vocals and then 12 more albums many of which she continued to arrange/play and produce herself.

The album "CANTADORA" is a new compilation of Sally's favourite tracks, recorded in her home studio over the years without any record company involvement.

The word "CANTADORA" is from ancient Spanish folklore, meaning "one who hands down myths and stories by word of mouth" or more literally - "STORYTELLER".

Together they form a collection of songs that represent her authentic artisitic vision - one brush - one canvas - one soul

Source in photo

Sally Oldfield on Amazon

Mike

Mike Oldfield is an artist like no other. Over the last 37 years he has produced timeless, unique and inspirational music that has enthralled listeners the world over.

In terms of overnight success stories, Mike Oldfield's is astounding. After a short stint playing bass in Kevin Ayers' backing band, he was taken under the guiding wing of a 22-year-old Richard Branson and Tubular Bells was born. Thrillingly enigmatic music that sounds like nothing before or since, a critical and commercial success, and, to cap it all, the coveted Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition after an excerpt was used in the film The Exorcist.

A blessing and a curse, the magnitude of Mike's sudden success could easily have stalled him and yet he returned almost immediately with another two-movement pastoral masterwork Hergest Ridge and a year later issued the groundbreaking world music suite Ommadawn. Mike Oldfield is that rare beast, the intuitive artist, a confident and creative multi-instrumentalist, not bound by rule or convention and content to follow his own path: "All I want to express with my music is my feelings. I think it's the purpose. To show images, landscapes, love, hate, fury."

Source and Photo

Mike Oldfield - Tubular Bells II LIVE at Edinburgh Castle Part 1

Do you know Terry, Sally, Mike?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Have heard their music before yes. Terry has many wonderful pieces of music to listen to in fact I like all of them but most of all Terry.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      No I dont! However, two things, i did meet Mike after the gig in Ipswich Gaumont on May 4 1980 (Platinum concert)! may have been his first gig in England as part of a tour (not sure!) and have his autograph from that! I also had a landlady who was good friends with Maggie reilly who I spoke to over the phone! Really got into your music from the Michael wood series in the 80's The Trojan War.

    • Ribolov LM profile image

      Ribolov LM 5 years ago

      Nice familiy, nice lens. Great job.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Very big familly.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Love your article, its interesting. :)

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I knew Mike, but had no idea about his brother and sister. Very nice lens, thank you for such beautiful music!