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Imagine No More Three Year-Old Behaviour Trouble Or Temper Tantrums Or Need To Discipline Your Three Year-Old.

Updated on June 20, 2016
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Those temper tantrums in 3 year-olds can be a nightmare. As is aggressive and hyperactive three year-old behaviour. The answer? Nasty chemical food additives!

This is what I've experienced as a grand-parent of a three year-old child ... for the second time!

I have been so concerned and so impressed by the need to know more about how to discipline a 3 year-old granddaughter - and the responsibility we have to care for this sensitive growing mind - including how to discipline a three year-old with hyperactive and troublesome behavior in the most effective and thoughtful ways - that I've put together this lens to offer some help to others (as well as to learn more for myself).

Here's a tip: have you tried Vitamin B supplements? You should be able to get a Vitamin B for children at your local pharmacy.

The problem may not be the child - food preservatives, colorings and flavorings could be to blame. Buy fresh preservative-free bread, cakes and cookies with no artificial colorings or flavorings and read labels on packaged food. My daughter uses 'The New Additive Code Breaker' as her constant shopping reference - with dramatic results.

For the price of a guide book and some discipline in what you buy for your child, reading the labels on packaged foods and asking the local bakery whether they use additives, it's definitely worth a try.

Update, post-Christmas, clear evidence!

The evidence is clear (for me). With my granddaughter on a strict no artificial colourings or flavours diet, there has been the unavoidable pre-Christmas parties, post-Christmas sharing of sweets when visiting friends - and the Christmas Carols night in the local park when Santa handed out sweets to the kids.

I observed an almost instant reaction whenever I was present (or later on visits to my home). On each occasion the hyperactivity lasted for 2 days, always. So in the midst of a clean slate, so to speak, of none of the suspect treats that kids tend to consume as a matter of course, here was proof right before my eyes (and my nervous system). Even a single lolly! One was found in my shopping bag - that I had hidden then forgotten - and the change in behaviour was almost instant.

I was speaking with a mother who had been through the same problem with her (now) 9 year old and, amazingly, they had narrowed the culprit down to the colour green. Now that's a tough one, but great if you can do it.

If you wish to try the same experiment, it's not as severe as we first thought. Simply avoid anything with colours like cake icings with coloured sprinkles, lollies, biscuits, ice cream, complex cereals and bars often labelled as being "full of goodness."

But that's not so bad. Here in Australia there are a number of major brands offering 'No Artificial Colours' in ice cream, biscuits, jelly/jello, lollies and a number of breakfast cereals. Stick with these. Chocolate seems to be okay (watch out for coloured centres), but with that goes sugar which, unless eaten to excess, is not guilty. Good luck.

It should be of great concern to us all that our children, who know nothing of what goes into the food and the treats they eat, might be getting the blame for, and being punished for, behavior for which they are not responsible.

Will the school kids in this revealing YouTube video be your child?

Food for thought from psychologist James Hillman

"In regard to children and their psychology, I want the scales of habit (and the masked hatred within the habit) to fall from our eyes. I want us to envision that what children go through has to do with finding a place in the world for their specific calling. They are trying to live two lives at once, the one they were born with and the one of the place and among the people they were born into. The entire image of a destiny is packed into a tiny acorn [what Hillman calls his Acorn Theory], the seed of a huge oak on small shoulders. And its call rings loud and persistent and is as demanding as any scolding voice from the surroundings. The call shows in the tantrums and obstinacies, in the shyness and retreats, that seem to set the child against our world but that may be protections of the world it comes with and comes from."

'THE SOUL'S CODE' by James Hillman

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    • Spiderlily321 profile image

      Spiderlily321 

      6 years ago

      This is a good lens! I have a 3 yr old boy and I try to watch the stuff that he eats all the time. Thank you for sharing

    • profile image

      smileyogurt 

      6 years ago

    • profile image

      rmstouffer 

      8 years ago

      I agree that today's foods play an important part of how a child behaves. I understand that to effectively discipline a child, you must take into consideration the foods that you are giving them to eat. Sugars and sweets along with all of the chemicals that are prevalent in foods today contribute to their bad behavior.

    • Gamganny profile image

      Gamganny 

      8 years ago

      Thanks for advice for 3 year olds, it can be a trying time. Blessed by an Angel

    • Louise0711 profile image

      Louise0711 

      8 years ago

      I have a boy who's just turned 3 and he's definitely becoming more independent. I think the article you have linked to for child behavior for a 3 year old offers some really good advice. I try to be firm but kind, have relevant consequences and boundaries but without shouting or smacking. It works for us!

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