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Kids' How to Make Corn Husk Dolls with Photos

Updated on June 13, 2018
Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren has taught pre-school through college. She loves the wonder of learning.

Woman Corn Husk Doll

A finished corn husk doll.
A finished corn husk doll. | Source

Low Cost Activity for Children's Summer Fun

If you are the parent or caregiver of a child from preschool through middle school age, you probably have many of the supplies on hand to make corn husk dolls. All you will need to procure is corn on the cob! (Please, buy it with the husks - do not husk it at the market.) I am giving my suggestions, modifications, and experiences based on the excellent book Native American Gardening - Stories, Projects and Recipes for Families by Michael J. Caduto and Joseph Bruchac. It is a fantastic book.

Ears of Fresh Corn

A traditional summer delight; fresh corn on the cob.
A traditional summer delight; fresh corn on the cob. | Source

First, Corn

Carefully peel the husks off the cob, trying hard to keep them intact. A trick I learned from a friend is to cut across the bottom with a paring knife before peeling. This helps immensely. Save these husk leaves and also save all the corn silk for hair.

I have only made the dolls after an overnight of drying. If you make them immediately upon husking, I have no idea how this will work. If you try it, please write a comment to let me know.

The knife trick is not part of the traditional way, but it sure makes things easier.
The knife trick is not part of the traditional way, but it sure makes things easier. | Source

Saved Corn Leaves and Corn Silk

Husks and hair (corn silk.)
Husks and hair (corn silk.) | Source
Cutco White Trimmer #1721W
Cutco White Trimmer #1721W

I love my Cutco paring knife for this kind of work. It makes the slicing SO easy. Pictured here is a slightly larger knife - a trimmer.

 

Other Supplies Needed

Most of us have these in our home:

String (or twine or embroidery floss or dental floss)

Scissors

Glue


Dried Corn Leaves and Corn Silk

Easy peezy.
Easy peezy. | Source

The Husks

From the photographs, you may already be wondering why are some husks are flat and some are curly? I think the big factor is humidity. When I make corn husk dolls inside an air-conditioned house, the husks stay flatter. When I make them in non-air-conditioned places and try to keep them flat by putting a plate over them, they get mildewy. Not good. Therefore, I leave them alone and they curl a little. This could actually be good for frills on a skirt, but you will hope for some relatively straight pieces.

Trim the pointed ends from the husks with your scissors. Also, trim the wider ends to be straight across.

Head and Body

Preparation to make the head and body.  Both of the ends need better trimming!
Preparation to make the head and body. Both of the ends need better trimming! | Source

Invert and Bend for Head

The best way to explain the next step is with excerpts from page 103 of Traditional Native Gardening.

"...the little bulb of husks will become the inside of the head.

"Turn the whole bundle over. Now invert the long pieces of husk down and bend them over the bulb...Gather these husks in tightly under the bulb and tie them off to form the neck."

This works beautifully and I find that using string enables one to really make a firm connection. That said, I wish I could be with native children to see their tips for secure ties with thin strips of husk.

Making the Head of the Corn Husk Doll

Invert the husks one at a time over the head "bulb."  This is similar to taking off a T-shirt over one's head.
Invert the husks one at a time over the head "bulb." This is similar to taking off a T-shirt over one's head. | Source
All the husks are inverted and gathered to make the neck.
All the husks are inverted and gathered to make the neck. | Source
The neck is tied.
The neck is tied. | Source

Arms

To make the arms, take a few of the thinner husks and roll them together to make a straight line as long as two arms fully extended. That is, two doll arms! Tie the ends to make wrists and trim the edges to even out the hands.

Body and Arms of Doll

Try to make the arms in relatively correct proportion to the body.
Try to make the arms in relatively correct proportion to the body. | Source

Insert Arms

Lift up half of the "body husks" below the head string. Place the arms piece across perpendicularly and centered. Then, gently replace them. Tie the body husks with another piece of string underneath the arms which will secure them and create a waist.

Waist is Secured

Lift and separate.  Place arms.
Lift and separate. Place arms. | Source
Tie below arms.  This photo actually shows extra skirt pieces being tied into the waist of a woman doll.
Tie below arms. This photo actually shows extra skirt pieces being tied into the waist of a woman doll. | Source

Making a Man Corn Husk Doll

All my photos are of female dolls. If you want to make a boy or man, now is the time to make legs instead of a skirt. Separate the husks hanging below the waist into a left bunch and a right bunch. If you need to use scissors or a knife to make an even division, use it. In the traditional method, thin strips of husks are wrapped around each leg like the diagonal stripes of a candy cane or a barber's pole. The bottoms are then tied securely and ends trimmed to have evenly-length feet. I would again use string over husk strips.

Finishing a Woman's Skirt

If you desire extra length or thickness in the skirt (or the curled husk ornamentation), add more husks around the waist and tie in place. Furthermore, if you wish, a wide husk waistband can be added over the top of the skirt and tied or glued in place.

Almost Finished Corn Husk Doll

Almost complete corn husk woman doll.
Almost complete corn husk woman doll. | Source

Coiffeur and Face

Finally we turn to the glue and the corn silk. Place a generous number of gobs of glue on top of the head and pat the dried corn silk in place. My kindergarten helper wanted to make Rapunzel and corn silk is wonderful for that sort of long, flowing hair!

The traditional native American method is to have no facial features. Certainly imagination can fill in whatever one wants to see. I am familiar with faceless dolls from our local Amish children, so this does not bother me. However, my helper felt the need to use a fine-tip marker to draw eyes and a mouth. It worked well on the dried husks.

Attaching Corn Silk Hair

Many of the white non-toxic glues dry invisibly, so do not be afraid to use lots of it.
Many of the white non-toxic glues dry invisibly, so do not be afraid to use lots of it. | Source
Ta-Da!
Ta-Da! | Source

Durability for Play

My helper is a gentle child who lives in a central air-conditioned house. Her dolls (oh yes, we had to make several once she made her first one!) stood up well to her playing. How will your dolls do? I cannot predict. I also wonder about the little ones living a hundred years ago who made dolls and practically lived outdoors. Please let me know what your family's experiences are.

PS - When you are done with this doll, it can go into the compost pile. What a bonus!

© 2011 Maren Elizabeth Morgan

Comments

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    • Maren Morgan M-T profile imageAUTHOR

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 

      5 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Toytasting - thanks. I did them with my niece and she thoroughly enjoyed it.

    • Toytasting profile image

      Toy Tasting 

      5 years ago from Mumbai

      This is so creative, will try them out with my niece

      Thanks for sharing! :)

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile imageAUTHOR

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 

      6 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Thanks, marcoujor. It is a fun activity for adults and kids, both.

    • marcoujor profile image

      Maria Jordan 

      6 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

      It was wonderful being referred to this charmingly crafty article through moonlake's delicious article on corn on the cob... so today was indeed a double bonus for me.

      Thank you for this useful information, which I will enjoy trying with the little ones in my family. Voted UP and UABI.

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile imageAUTHOR

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 

      7 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Aaah, the simple pleasures. There is a lot of pride in creating something unique. Thanks for your comment.

    • jean2011 profile image

      jean2011 

      7 years ago from Canada

      I remember doing this when I was growing up as a kid. It's a very creative, and cheap way to get a doll, and to learn how to sew. I have voted this hub interesting. Thank you for sharing.

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile imageAUTHOR

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 

      7 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Thanks, peacelovejoycoming. It is kind of easy, once you know what you are doing, isn't it?

    • profile image

      peecelovejoycoming 

      7 years ago

      this is a really good easy corn husk doll.

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile imageAUTHOR

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 

      7 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Or, even make one for your home décor now. I agree about the memories - I think it is the doing and the togetherness factor as much as anything. thanks for writing, Avamum.

    • Avamum profile image

      Sarita Harbour 

      7 years ago from Yellowknife, Canada

      This is very cool. What an original idea for a hub! Isn't it true that some of the best memories we can make with our kids come from some of the least expensive and non-techno-gadget-like activities? I can't wait to try making a corn husk doll with my littlest girl....in a couple of years or so! Nice photos as well.

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile imageAUTHOR

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 

      7 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Thanks, kat11. It really is rather easy. Maybe you can post a photo if you and yours make some?

    • kat11 profile image

      kat11 

      7 years ago from Illinois

      In the Midwest we have a lot of festivals that we took our children to during the summer months. I can remember going to one where my daughter was intrigued by the Native American's making corn husk dolls. This article was awesome and the steps of making the corn husk doll with photos was great.

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile imageAUTHOR

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 

      7 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Hey sp smartee - I agree. It would be a good way to occupy the kids during a vacation, at day care or camp, or vbs.

    • profile image

      sp smartee 

      7 years ago

      Amazing art ..useful for kids specially in summer ..i think it may be great fun and enjoyment for kids ,,,thanks..

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile imageAUTHOR

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 

      7 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Hi PrairiePrincess! Once I found the instructions in the gardening book, I HAD to give it a try. Since I learn best with visual aids, I tried to capture every step on camera. I hope you can share this skill with your mom.

    • prairieprincess profile image

      Sharilee Swaity 

      7 years ago from Canada

      Maren, this hub caught my eye because a neighbour bought some corn husk dolls when my sister and I were children, and my Mom had always been curious about how they are made. Now you have answered it! Such sweet dolls. Thank you!

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