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Old Pictures of Farming in North Dakota in the early 1900s

Updated on March 6, 2017
Peggy W profile image

My mother has told me so many wonderful stories about our rich family history. There is much to learn by reviewing the past.

My great uncle's tractor (probably a late 1920s version?)
My great uncle's tractor (probably a late 1920s version?) | Source

Farming

My great aunt and great uncle used to own and run a large farming operation near Mapes, North Dakota. The numerous photos that I have included in this post tell a story of their own.

My mother was not quite 5 years of age when she got to visit the farm in 1930. It had been in operation for many years prior to her visit. Thus these pictures represent farming in that part of the country dating back to the early 1900s.

Some history...

In 1870 that part of the country only had a population of around 2,400 people.

Indians and buffalo roamed the prairie lands.

Large scale farming began in 1875 near the Red River Valley and was primarily brought about because of the westward expansion of the railroad.

Generous land grants also encouraged people to travel west and settle in that region.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
My great aunt & uncle's home in North Dakota.Another view of their home.
My great aunt & uncle's home in North Dakota.
My great aunt & uncle's home in North Dakota. | Source
Another view of their home.
Another view of their home. | Source

Our 39th State...North Dakota!

North Dakota joined the United States by becoming it's 39th State on November 2, 1889.

By 1930 the total population had expanded to 680,000+ individuals calling North Dakota their home.

My great uncle's car
My great uncle's car | Source

1902 Threshing machine

How my great aunt and uncle came to farm that land, I can only now speculate. But just knowing how farms were passed along from father to son, I would guess that my great uncle's parents probably secured the land from one of those land grants.

My great uncle had siblings in the area who also farmed and in fact, when one of his brothers died leaving a rather large family behind, he and my great aunt helped to rear that batch of children in order to help his widowed sister-in-law.

They did not have children of their own so they just took on that self-assigned task as the natural thing to do.

Old farm photos

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Feeding the plough horsesKids on horsebackGoing for a ride in the wagon
Feeding the plough horses
Feeding the plough horses | Source
Kids on horseback
Kids on horseback | Source
Going for a ride in the wagon
Going for a ride in the wagon | Source

Old Tractors

Mapes, North Dakota

Mapes is located in the northeast part of North Dakota west of Grand Forks. It can be found on a map by locating Grand Forks on Interstate 29 and then following highway 2 west. Elevation is at 1505 feet. The area is flat and one can see unobstructed views for miles.

If one sees a cluster of trees (or a grove of trees as my great aunt called them), the grouping is either growing naturally by a riverbed or was planted purposely to surround a house as a windbreak and for much needed shade.

Look at that flat North Dakota horizon!
Look at that flat North Dakota horizon! | Source

According to one link I found, Mapes now has a population of about 159 people. Another link lists it as a ghost town with fewer people in residence.

Some puppies amidst corn husks
Some puppies amidst corn husks | Source

Harvest Time of Year

How things used to be done...

My great aunt and uncle had a large operation and employed at least one man full time and perhaps more.

In addition their relatives and neighbors would have helped each other for large events such as harvesting the crops and threshing times.

Working together was common back then for major events.

Old Photos of Harvest Time of Year

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Harvest time of yearWorking in the fieldsThe women helped
Harvest time of year
Harvest time of year | Source
Working in the fields
Working in the fields | Source
The women helped
The women helped | Source

During harvest time, the women would do the cooking and transport the food to the fields to feed the men.

This was a monumental project in and of itself as the hungry men who were laboring needed the sustenance and calories to fuel them to keep going after the food breaks.

The "cook house" which was on wheels would be hitched up to the large plough horses and transport the cooked food to wherever the men happened to be working.

Old Cook House Photo

The women would prepare meals and the food would be transported to the men in the field during threshing time. This building called a "cook house" was on wheels and the horses would pull it.
The women would prepare meals and the food would be transported to the men in the field during threshing time. This building called a "cook house" was on wheels and the horses would pull it. | Source

Other times of the year, feeding the chickens, the turkeys, the pigs, the horses, and the cows would have kept anyone on a tight schedule in addition to the farming that was done.

Feeding chickens
Feeding chickens | Source

Women's Chores

Chores typically performed by women back then would have included the cooking and cleaning of the house; canning and preserving of food; keeping clothes clean and ironed; mending and sewing; not to mention the myriad little things that make a house a home. Gathering eggs and feeding the animals was also done.

Old Farm Photos with Pigs

Click thumbnail to view full-size
They also had pigs to feed...More pigs!
They also had pigs to feed...
They also had pigs to feed... | Source
More pigs!
More pigs! | Source
They had some dairy cows.
They had some dairy cows. | Source

My great aunt and uncle had many out buildings to house equipment, animals and the like on their large acreage.

My uncle was a master farmer who not only did a great job farming with what he had been given by way of inheritance and learning, but he kept abreast of the latest trends.

He harvested the best seeds for planting the next year. He planted not only wheat and corn, but flax and soybeans.

He was way ahead of the curve on planting flax and soybeans and was rewarded economically for his efforts.


Old Farm Photo

Source

Many farmers back in those days only raised one or two crops. If pestilence or weather intervened to cause crop failures, they had little reserve to call upon to help them out of their predicament.

History shows that not only the Great Depression but the drought that occurred in the 1930s devastated many farmers.

My great aunt and uncle survived and went on to farm for many years. This is a testament to their hardiness and smart farming techniques.

Many of their turkeys were sold at Thanksgiving time to a large distributing company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They were very proud of this fact because that company only accepted the best of poultry.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
They raised loads of turkeys!Feeding the turkeysFeeding the turkeys
They raised loads of turkeys!
They raised loads of turkeys! | Source
Feeding the turkeys
Feeding the turkeys | Source
Feeding the turkeys
Feeding the turkeys | Source
Some calves
Some calves | Source

When I was born, my great aunt and uncle were already retired and had sold their farm. So I never got to see it.

I am just happy to have all of these photos and to have heard a little about their part in history with respect to farming in North Dakota in the early 20th century.

Look at the spikes on that tractor wheel!
Look at the spikes on that tractor wheel! | Source
 Resting after a days work on the farm and visiting.
Resting after a days work on the farm and visiting. | Source

Location of Mapes, North Dakota

A markerMapes, North Dakota -
Mapes, ND 58344, USA
get directions

© 2009 Peggy Woods

Comments are welcomed!

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    • Peggy W profile image
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      Peggy Woods 3 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Don,

      Nice seeing you here via a comment. My mother got to see this large farming operation when she was a child. Needless-to-say the farm had been sold and my great aunt and uncle were retired when I got to know them. Thanks for the share.

    • dahoglund profile image

      Don A. Hoglund 3 months ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      HI Peggy. I don't know if my original comment got posted or not. The format has changed since I was active on hubpages. By the time I saw the family farms the grandparents were mostly retired and maybe renting the land out to neighbors. sharing.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 3 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Virginia,

      Many people seem to really like these old farming photos from earlier days in North Dakota. Thanks for the shares. Perhaps it will introduce many more people to what it was like back in the early 1900s.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 3 months ago from Central Florida

      I'll share your link in a few nostalgia groups on Facebook. They will enjoy these so much. Hope it brings you lots of visitors.

    • Peggy W profile image
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      Peggy Woods 3 months ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Mike and Dorothy McKenney,

      Those certainly were simpler times back then! I am pleased that you enjoyed the photos of what farming was like in the early 1900s. Thanks for your comment.

    • Casey White profile image

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 3 months ago from United States

      Such great photos and interesting stories. Sometimes don't you wish we could all go back to a "simpler" (ha) time?

    • Peggy W profile image
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      Peggy Woods 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi ladyguitarpicker,

      In the old days entire families worked together for the good of all. Kids also had chores and did a lot of hard work. It was just expected. I am glad you enjoyed these pictures going back to an earlier time...especially since you had a family farm. Thanks for your comment.

    • ladyguitarpicker profile image

      stella vadakin 2 years ago from 3460NW 50 St Bell, Fl32619

      The farm was a lot of work for the whole family. Women did work back then, they just didn't get paid for it. We had a family farm but nothing this hard. I enjoyed your hub and the photos of the old tractors. Nice Hub, Stella

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Au fait,

      You made an interesting observation regarding the women wearing dresses. It would appear that one of them was driving the team of horses. My maternal grandmother who died the same year President Kennedy was assassinated never wore pants. My other grandmother who lived to be in her early 80's did wear pants but that was many years later. House dresses and then better ones for church, etc. were the norm, from what I have gathered, for women's clothing in the early 1900s.

      Thanks for sharing part of your family history with us regarding what your mother wore when working on the farm. Interesting also about your grandmother not exercising her right to vote after that battle was fought and won. One of my grandmothers never learned how to drive a car. Times certainly have changed!

      Thanks for the votes and shares. Much appreciated.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      What great photos! You are so lucky to have all these photos to be able to look back at your families history. Very interesting.

      As you know I grew up on a small farm as did my mother. There were 8 children in her family and she was 2nd oldest, born in 1912. The girls and the boys had to work out in the fields and my mother preferred it to working inside.

      I have to say that my mother never got dressed up in fancy clothes to do field or barn work. Was a little surprised to see women in dresses on a wagon with pitchforks or whatever they're using. Skirts could get caught in things and bad accidents occur.

      I know a lot of women wore house dresses to feed the livestock or work in their gardens, but that's usually light work compared to working on harvesting in the fields. No one wore dresses to do any of the work on our farm, but that was several years later than your photos here.

      Interesting to see how people lived back then and the ideas people had about what was proper. My maternal grandmother never would vote because she couldn't accept that it was proper for women to do that. She was around 30 when women got the vote in 1920. I never knew her to wear jeans or trousers of any kind no matter what. Same with both my grandmothers. Only dresses or skirts and blouses.

      Isn't it funny (strange) how times change and how painful it is sometimes when those changes come around? People so determined that things have to be a certain way or the world will end. People thinking everyone must do things their way or else. Even I have a hard time not being shocked at the young school aged girls who wear cheek-teaser short shorts to school and it's allowed.

      A really fantastic article letting everyone see a glimpse into life back in the good ol' days. Voted up and interesting. Pinning this to my 'Education' board because I think it is educational for most people today who never saw anything like those days. Sharing as well with followers. Appreciate so much your sharing these photos.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Will,

      My hubby when he was a boy also helped his aunt and uncle on an Iowa farm. In his case he drove a tractor with a wagon behind it while hay was being bundled and hauled. He was too young to do anything else but felt really important that he could help in that way. It is a fond memory of his.

      Glad you liked reading this. Yes...farming has really changed compared to years past!

    • WillStarr profile image

      WillStarr 2 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      When I was about 12 years old, I helped thresh oats on my uncle's Iowa farm. Since I was too small to toss the shocks up on the wagon, I drove the flat bed truck, a real thrill for a boy!

      At noon, the women served us mountains of fried chicken. mashed potatoes, corn on the cob, and all sorts of different pies. Then it was back to work.

      The oats were fed into a monstrous thresher, belt powered by a massive, snorting steam engine, belching smoke and fire. It took three men just to run the engine and two to keep the thresher free from jams. The whole operation was exceedingly dangerous, and many lives were lost back in those days.

      All that is gone now, with modern machinery allowing one man to do the job that used to take at least a dozen (not counting small boys and wives!), but it's a memory that I treasure.

      Great Hub, Peggy!

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Paul,

      Pictures can be worth a thousand words in many cases. This was long before my time and I am happy to have them as they are a part of my family history. Farming is hard work as you know first-hand since your dad did it. Thanks for your comment, votes and shares.

    • Paul Kuehn profile image

      Paul Richard Kuehn 2 years ago from Udorn City, Thailand

      Peggy, This is an awesome hub which certainly brings back memories of when my dad started farming in the early 50s when I was very young. I remember that he had one small tractor which had rubber tires. At harvesting time, he would thresh his oats and it took a lot of men to do it. Pictures are worth a thousand words and yours really tell a great story about farming in the early 20th century. Voted up as awesome, interesting, and useful. I am sharing this on Facebook and with my HP followers.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi poetryman6969,

      I took another look at that photo you referenced and noticed that the horses still had their harnesses on. Two of them were probably teamed up together and were not likely to start running off. I would imagine that the kids were perched there just for the photo with a parent nearby. At least that is my guess.

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 2 years ago

      I like to see the old pictures. It seems strange to see such small children atop such large horses. We have a different idea about what is dangerous these days.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Patricia,

      My great uncle liked the wide open spaces and when he and my great aunt would travel together to other parts of the country, he often thought the view was destroyed by trees being in the way. Beauty in his eye was definitely the wide open spaces! It is interesting as to how our country was developed and how it has evolved over the years. Agriculture has certainly changed as just one example. Thanks for the votes, share and pin and wishes of angels.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 2 years ago from sunny Florida

      What a treasure trove of photos...each one telling its own story. The photo of the horizon reminded me of when we lived in South Dakota. You can see FOREVER. I could stand at our home in Rapid City and see the hangar where my (then) husband worked!!! It was 7 miles away. Talking about 'big sky country'....

      Enjoyed this Peggy...it is so fascinating to learn of the history of our country, made one family at a time.

      Voted up up and away shared and pinned to Awesome HubPages

      Angels are winging their way to you this afternoon ps

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Virginia,

      It appears that you are interested in many of my stories dating back in time. I am fortunate to have these photos and to have heard these stories as I was growing up. I did know that aunt and uncle very well but never did see their farm. Thanks for your comment.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 2 years ago from Central Florida

      What a great way to preserve these photos and make them available for anyone wanting to know about early farming.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Peg,

      Nice that you could relate to old farm photos like this of your own family. So glad that you enjoyed this.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Shyron,

      So glad that this reminded you of your own family and the farming roots. Thanks for your comment and happy to know that you liked the photos.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello MG Singh,

      So very glad that you enjoyed seeing these vintage family photos.

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 3 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      Amazing photos and what a great story of your ancestors who farmed. My family did too, in South Georgia, about the same time frame so the pictures seemed quite familiar to those of our family. The haircuts on the kids and pics with the farm animals and dogs were fabulous.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago from Texas

      Peggy, how awesome, I lived with my grandparents on their farm which was from 1828 my great, great grandfather owned the farm. It was passed down to my grandfather. My cousin now owns the land (12 acres)where the old farm house stood, and where her house now stands. My mom's portion was sold to another cousin on my father's side of the family. I don't have any of the pictures from that era. I would not even know where to look for them.

      I really enjoyed looking at the pictures, showing the pictures of your family history.

      Voted up across the board (except funny)

      Shyron

    • MG Singh profile image

      MG Singh 3 years ago from Singapore

      Lovely pictures that give an excellent feel of that era.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Pearl,

      As one example (and there are many more) check out the hub titled Handwritten Old Letter from WW1 War Buddy from Frisco, Texas dated 1921. You will see what I mean by reading some of the comments. I have been contacted by other people regarding other personal type family history hubs as well. Really eager to read what you will be writing about your grandparents. :))

    • grandmapearl profile image

      Connie Smith 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Wow, Peggy! I had no idea how far-reaching this kind of article could be! Thanks for sharing this information with me. It was always fascinating to me to learn about my personal family history, but it never occurred to me that it could be so useful.

      You have definitely inspired me!

      :) Pearl

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Pearl,

      These accounts really ARE historical in nature. There are relatively few farmers left as compared to the past. Now most of the agriculture in our country is run by big corporations.

      Because of writing about some of my family's past, several letters are now in a museum up in Grapevine, Tx. They would have been happy with just the copies...but after talking to the oldest relative that was still alive, it was decided a museum was the best place for them.

      I was also contacted by a professor in England who wanted more information about my grandfather's part in WW1. Those are just some examples of what can come of sharing personal family history. Others ARE interested! It amazes me sometimes.

    • grandmapearl profile image

      Connie Smith 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Hi Peggy, Sadly, my uncle passed away several years ago. He had his own farm, and my other uncle also passed just a year after his brother. That uncle had inherited my grandparents' dairy farm. But when he became too ill to take care of it, he sold it to a childhood friend.

      I understand that his friend is still farming, though I'm not sure if he is in the dairy business or not.

      I was a little reluctant to write a family history-type hub; but as you say, it will be historical. I will let you know when it is finished so you can read it. Thank you for your continued interest. That means a lot to me!

      Pearl

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi again Pearl,

      I look forward to reading about your grandparents and their dairy farm in Pennsylvania. While your article will be personal like this one is about my great aunt and great uncle, it is also historical reflecting the times back then. Please let me know when yours is published in case I miss it in the feed. I was born and lived my early childhood in the Dairy State...Wisconsin. My paternal grandmother grew up on a farm with cows but it was not a huge operation. Is anyone in your family still in that business?

    • grandmapearl profile image

      Connie Smith 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Hi Peggy, I haven't written about my grandparents yet, but I am gathering old photos and have a rough draft for an article about them and their dairy farm in Pennsylvania. They were a hard-working and hardy bunch for sure. Thanks for the encouragement. I am still looking through my Mom's pictures for what I need to finish the article.

      I hope you have a great day!

      Pearl

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Pearl,

      So nice to hear a bit about your family history with regard to farming. Thanks for your comment, votes and the share. Have you written about your grandparents?

    • grandmapearl profile image

      Connie Smith 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State

      Peggy, I think we must have a whole lot in common. Every picture brought back a memory of my own, with the exception of the turkeys. My grandparents didn't raise turkeys. Wow, I was amazed at how many there were in your images.

      I know that my grandparents had hired hands at harvest time. The rest of the year they managed with just the help of my uncles and aunts and my Mom. My Grandma raised chickens for eggs and Sunday dinner!

      Thanks for sharing all these wonderful photos, my kindred spirit!

      Voted Up+ and sharing. I'm glad you suggested this. I really enjoyed it.

      Pearl

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Alicia,

      I have a bunch of old black and white photos also. I'm so glad that my mother and I sat down and worked together assembling photo albums many years ago labeling all of those old photos. Had we not done that, I may never have known what some of the pictures represented. If your family photos are not labeled, ask someone while you still have someone that knows the names and relationships to help you before it is too late.

      It is nice to see the history that is represented in old photos. They tell a story all their own.

      Thanks for your comment.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 5 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      The old photographs are beautiful, Peggy, and provide a fascinating look at a way of life that existed in the past. I've been looking at old black and white photos of my own family recently, and like you I'm so glad that I kept them. They are a wonderful way to jog the memory and a great record of things that may no longer exist. Thanks for an interesting hub.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Mary,

      Thanks for sharing this hub with all of the old photos of a big farming operation in the early 1900's from North Dakota. I wish that I could have seen that farm in person but my relatives were already retired by the time I arrived on the scene. We are fortunate to have all of those old photos. Some of them were tiny and actually show up better in this format than the actual photos!

      As to kids working...it was just expected especially on a farm. There were no distractions like the kids have today with TV, cell phones and so forth.

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 5 years ago from Florida

      Hi Peggy W. I can't tell you how much I enjoyed reading this and looking at the old photos. I wish my family had saved photos like your family did. You are so fortunate to have them. I loved their house, their farm, the animals, everything! Seeing the children at work reminded me of my childhood picking cotton. I wrote a Hub about that. Children worked very hard back then. Do they even know what that word "work" means now a days???

      I voted this UP, and would like my followers to read it, too.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello daisynicolas,

      I am so grateful that I was interested in learning the things I did about my family history. Wish I knew even more but many of the people I could ask are now gone. My mother was a great person for telling stories about the past. Glad that you enjoyed this. Thanks for your comment.

    • daisynicolas profile image

      daisynicolas 5 years ago from Alaska

      You have a family wealth of American history to be proud of. I've enjoyed viewing your hubs and being transported to that era.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello KoffeeKlatch Gals,

      These pictures really do tell a story all their own. Glad that you liked this peek back into some farm history from the early 1900's. Appreciate your comment.

    • KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

      Susan Haze 5 years ago from Sunny Florida

      Peggy, i just love your pictures. Your stories are terrific and the pictures ass to them. I love reading family histories. Up and awesome.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Marv,

      Thanks for your interest in Mapes, North Dakota. Wish that I could have seen the big farming operation that my great aunt and uncle had in that area of the country, but I was born a generation too late as they had already retired. Thanks for your comment. Appreciate it!

    • profile image

      Marv 5 years ago

      I love these photos. I have traveled numerous times through Mapes and I've often wondered what Mapes was like in it's hayday. Today there's a sign on Highway 2 that says Mapes, but it looks to be no more than a farm from what I can tell.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Don,

      By the time I came along, most of my relatives that had done farming were already retired. I'm glad to have these photos of what it had been like on a large farm in North Dakota. Thanks for your comment, votes and the share.

    • dahoglund profile image

      Don A. Hoglund 5 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      Hi Peggy,Those are neat pictures. My grandparents were retired or semi-retired when I was a kid.About all they had was a garden and some chickens. My mothers folks leased there land and later moved to town.I vaguely remember being around when workers were out with equipment to harvest, sort of a threshing bee.I also got exposed to some of these things working on rural papers but everyone took me for a city boy.Which I was.Vote up, interesting beautiful and sharing.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello Fatigmon,

      Nice to know someone that knows Mapes where my great aunt and uncle did their farming in North Dakota. I had heard about the massive amounts of food that would be prepared for the people during threshing times. Thanks for your comment!

    • profile image

      Fatigmon 5 years ago

      I'm certainly glad that I found this hub. Growing up I lived in both Petersburg and Lakota. How many times have I traveled through Mapes, ND, I'd never be able to count them. I am old enough to remember hauling bundles and feeding the threshing machine. The women at that time spent the entire day cooking to feed hungry threshing crews. When I think about those days I remember the food. Great hub, thanks.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Duchess,

      I created this hub some time ago. I should probably break up the photos with more text capsules in between. In any case, I am glad that you liked seeing these vintage photos of what farming was like back in the early 1900's on a large farm in North Dakota. Thanks for your comment.

    • profile image

      Duchess OBlunt 5 years ago

      Another wonderful Hub Peggy W. and another Must share. I love the old photos. They certainly portray a true picture of the hard work and way of life. Thank you for sharing this one!

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Mark,

      I agree. Those were the days of "early to bed and early to rise..." with little time in between to get into too much trouble. Children worked right alongside their parents depending upon their age and capacity. It was hard work but rewarding as to the feeling of accomplishment. People also worked with their neighbors and friends during busy times of the year such as harvest time. Glad that you liked this look at farming in the early 1900's as seen on my relative's farm in North Dakota. Thanks for your comment.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello craftdrawer,

      So happy to hear that you enjoyed seeing these old photos of my great aunt and uncle's farm in North Dakota. This shows much about a large farming operation in the early 1900's and the effort that was expended in running such a business. Thanks for your comment.

    • craftdrawer profile image

      craftdrawer 5 years ago

      I really enjoyed reading about your great aunt and uncle and the photos are amazing. It's great to preserve family history and be able to share it with others!

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi katyzzz,

      Obviously you have an attraction for old tractors. Thanks for your comment on these pictures of farming in North Dakota in the early 1900's. It was quite an operation according to the stories I heard from my mother and of course, these pictures tell a story of their own.

    • Peggy W profile image
      Author

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello Keith Tax,

      I agree with your statement. Having spent my childhood in the countryside of Wisconsin, I will always appreciate the country and nature. So glad that this hub about farming in North Dakota brought back good memories for you especially since you still do some on the side. Appreciate your comment.

    • katyzzz profile image

      katyzzz 5 years ago from Sydney, Australia

      You sure know how to write good hubs, Peggy and that old tractor got me in on this one, it drew my like a magnet

    • KeithTax profile image

      Keith Schroeder 5 years ago from Wisconsin

      You bring back a lot of memories of growing up farming in NE Wisconsin. We had two Farmall M tractors and a newer Oliver, a green beast. Now I farm on the side and bought a WWII era 38 hp John Deere. They say you can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy. Thanks for the walk down memory lane.

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      Peggy Woods 6 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello Alissa D,

      You have my permission to use them and if at all possible please give a link back to this hub as the source. I would love to see the webisode in which some of these pictures may be utilized. Any way possible to leave a link to that here after it is assembled?

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      Alissa D 6 years ago

      Hi Peggy,

      I am with the Alliance of the Future of Agriculture in Nebraska (A-FAN). We are looking for old, vintage farm photos to use for the background of some webisodes. I was wondering if I could use a some of your photos.

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      Peggy Woods 6 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Mrs. J.B.,

      Glad that you enjoyed these family pictures of farming done by my great aunt and uncle in North Dakota going back to the early 1900's. Thanks for your interest and comment.

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      Mrs. J. B. 6 years ago from Southern California

      I just love love love stories like this. The pictures alone were fabulous. Thanks for a great story.

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      Peggy Woods 6 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Jeremy Woods,

      Others may have suggestions but this is where I would start...

      If your grandfather owned the land that he farmed, there should be records showing that. Tax records in the county? Land grant? Or perhaps court records? Do you live anywhere near New Rockford, North Dakaota? If so perhaps someone still lives there that remembers your family? Has anyone in your family researched geneology records?

      Hope this helps.

      If anyone else comes along and reads this, perhaps you can help Jeremy? Thanks!

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      Jeremy Woods 6 years ago

      My great grandfather,and grandpa was from New Rockford,North Dakota...We have a family history there...I am pretty sure my grandfather was a farmer there... How would i find out ??? My email is Hollywood-76@hotmail.com

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      Peggy Woods 6 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello Eiddwen,

      Nice that you have memories of visiting your grandmother's farm. I never got to see the farming of my great aunt and uncle in North Dakota as they were already retired when I knew them, but my mother and family did. These photos are from an old family album and of course I heard many stories through the years. Glad you liked this! Thanks for the comment.

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      Eiddwen 6 years ago from Wales

      I don't know how I've missed this hub because I thoroughly enjoyed every single word and picture in it.

      I stayed very often at my grandmother's farm when i was little and I loved all you photos. You are so lucky to have so many to cherish. I am now going to read some more of your work.

      Thank you so much for sharing.

      Take care.

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      Peggy Woods 7 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello billyaustindillon,

      Yes, farming has certainly evolved but obviously still means hard work especially during certain seasons of the year...planting and harvesting probably being the busiest times. Glad you enjoyed these old photos of some of my family members in North Dakota going back to the early 1900's. I also found it interesting about the UFO's. Back when my great aunt and uncle were alive, I never heard them mention anything about that.

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      billyaustindillon 7 years ago

      Lovely old photos - there is something about black and white photos. The old tractor with the metal rims is amazing. The evolution of farming is such a great testament to how society developed. We tend to forget that in modern times. The hard work, the food, the inventions and the values. That was interesting the UFO deal.

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      Peggy Woods 7 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello Brooke Shenberger,

      So happy that you will be able to utilize these old family pictures for your 4-H project regarding agriculture in the early 1900's. This certainly fits the parameters of that assignment. Thanks for letting me know! :-)

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      Peggy Woods 7 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello Tractor,

      Yes, I also like the pictures of those old tractor tires as well as all those old farming pictures taken in North Dakota in the early 1900s. Thanks for leaving a comment.

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      Brooke Shenberger 7 years ago

      Our 4-H group is doing reports and displays from 1900's our family got "agriculture" your pictures and info is great Thanks so much for posting :O)

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      Tractor 7 years ago

      Wow, just love those old pics, especially of the Tractors

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      Peggy Woods 7 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Greetings Putz Ballard,

      So happy that you liked these pictures of farming in North Dakota when my great aunt and uncle farmed that land in the early 1900's. I never got to see it, but my mother did as a child and as a young adult before they finally sold it and retired. They did not have children to carry on the tradition. It was hard work, but also rewarding in many ways.

      I take it from your comment that you like farming? Thanks for taking the time to post your comment.

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      Putz Ballard 7 years ago

      I loved your hub and pictures, especially the old farmhouse. Nothing like the farm way of life.

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Journey,

      I was fortunate to end up with all these old farming photos of my great aunt and great uncle who used to live in North Dakota. So glad that others are enjoying the view and bit of history as well. Thanks for the comment.

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      Nyesha Pagnou MPH 8 years ago from USA

      Wow Peggy, this is awesome. Thanks for sharing this bit of history with us. Very interesting and I love the pics.

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      There are a few hills in Iowa...and when the corn is high it might obscure a clear view. Ha!

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      Plants and Oils 8 years ago from England

      Bill Bryson said of his home in Iowa that you only had to stand on a phone book to get a view. He also said a dead cow drew a crowd (-:

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Plants and Oils,

      I have heard stories of when my aunt and uncle would travel, if there were mountains and trees, he used to comment that things like that were blocking his view. Ha! Guess he liked those wide open spaces.

      As they say..."Beauty is in the eye of the beholder."

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      Plants and Oils 8 years ago from England

      And they built most of the homes, to boot!

      Dakota sounds very flat and extensive - miles and miles of miles and miles.

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Just imagine building all those homes...starting gardens, etc. over and over again. Not to mention making new friends. Amazing!

      Thanks for the added details.

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      Plants and Oils 8 years ago from England

      From what I recall, Mary and Laura were born in Wisconsin, then they moved to "Indian Territory" where Carrie was born, back to Wisconsin, then to Minnesota, then another place in Minnesota, then Iowa, then back to Minnesota, then one place in Dakota, then the final place in Dakota, De Smet. And that was all in about 12 - 14 years!

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Wow! That IS a bunch of moving and re-settling!

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      Plants and Oils 8 years ago from England

      It is very good. I think the father suffered from seriously itchy feet - from the biography, they moved around even more than it might suggest in the books, and he didn't like staying anywhere more than a year or two.

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Am sure he did what he thought necessary at the time? I've not read the Laura Wilder biography, but am sure it is interesting.

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      Plants and Oils 8 years ago from England

      No, I've not seen anything on television, just the books, and I read a biography of Laura Wilder recently, too.

      When I was a child, my view of the books was quite different - now I tend to think her father was a bit selfish, dragging the family around like he did.

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello again Plants and Oils,

      I also loved those books and the TV series that they made with her books as a basis. Have you gotten to see the "Little House on the Prairie" TV series in England?

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      Plants and Oils 8 years ago from England

      It is great. My only previous knowledge of farming in Dakota (or anything about Dakota) comes from Laura Wilder's books!

    • Peggy W profile image
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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Plants and Oils,

      Glad you stumbled upon this hub of farming in North Dakota in the early 1900's. It is an interesting part of history even if it was not some of my family members involved.

      Thanks for the comment.

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      Plants and Oils 8 years ago from England

      This is a fascinating hub - stumbled!

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi kiran, I agree. The photos just about tell the entire story. Thanks for your comment.

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      kiran8 8 years ago from Mangalore, India

      Excellent hub ! and the pics speak volumes - thanks a lot :)

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi C.S. Alexis, Glad that I could share this with you! Thanks for reading and commenting.

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Melody, I think that they enjoyed it, but it certainly was hard work. Of course if you are working for yourself it makes all the difference. Thanks for the comment.

    • C.S.Alexis profile image

      C.S.Alexis 8 years ago from NW Indiana

      This was so interesting. I have some kind of fascination with the farmers of this era and how they worked so hard. Really appreciate you sharing the photos and story. Thank you.

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      Melody Lagrimas 8 years ago from Philippines

      I guess they had a wonderful life in that beautiful place.

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Pete, Yes, my uncle was a learned man but not due to formal schooling. In fact, as was common back then, he did never even get as far as high school with any kind of formal education. But he was smart, kept up with the latest information regarding agriculture, the best seeds, the best farming techniques, even smart marketing regarding the sale of his turkeys, etc. so that he became very successful. Lots of hard work!!!

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Nolimits Nana, I thought that the historical aspect was particularly nice also. The photos tell the story... Thanks for commenting.

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      Peggy Woods 8 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi G-Ma, Glad that this could bring back some good memories of your visits. It was a great farm from what I hear. Thanks for the quick comment.

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      Pete Maida 8 years ago

      Your uncle was a brilliant man. No one recognizes that kind of cleverness. You are lucky to have so many pictures of your family. I just have a few that are more than fifty years old.

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      Nolimits Nana 8 years ago

      Thanks for an interesting historical hub. Love the photos.