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Late Talking Children - The Einstein Syndrome

Updated on July 17, 2011

Late Talking Children - The Einstein Syndrome

The Einstein Syndrome (coined by Sowell and Camarata) helps explain a certain group of late talking children. This page is inspired by my late talking son and I hope to enlighten other parents the theory. Although I have never had my son diagnosed, he does share many of the characteristics described by Dr. Camarata.

The syndrome, Einstein Syndrome, was named for Albert Einstein who was a very late talker and displayed all of the characteristics that these very children display.

How I Discovered the Einstein Syndrome

My son was a very late talker. At the age of five and a half he is just beginning to use sentences. When he was younger, I read anything I could about late talking and came upon the Einstein Syndrome and found it absolutely fascinating. Although I do not believe my son has Einstein Syndrome, I was compelled to share what I learned.

Please read and enjoy what I learned on my path to unravel my son, the mystery and hopefully help those who are on the same path.

The Einstein Syndrome is a phrase coined by Thomas Sowell. It implies that although there are different types of late talking children, there is a small group of these children who are very gifted.

It is believed that these children talk late because parts of their brain are developing at a faster pace than other children, therefore, their language suffers. This is what they believe happened to Albert Einstein.

There are different aspects of these children's lives that seem to follow a pattern. The children are not social with peers, they are stubborn in nature, potty training usually happens later than other children, they are usually great analytical thinkers. Lastly, they come from the same parental background. Their parents, grandparents and aunts/uncles are in three various professions: musicians, mathematicians (analytical thinkers) and engineering. Most importantly, these children do not suffer from any underlying speech disorders. Their hearing is fine and they do not have motor skills that are affecting their speech.

My personal experience with these children is with my oldest son. He is 2.7 years old and although has some words, very few are clearly spoken. He never babbled as an infant and began doing this at around 8 months. He had 2 words at 18 months and to this only has about 5 true words. Now at 3.1 years old, he has about 50 words.

He is a very caring young man and is very athletic. At 7 months he had a perfect pincer grab and was able to roll a ball back and forth with us. At 1.5 years he could accurately hit a golf ball, baseball off a t-ball and run with the dexterity of a child much older. At age three he is very nimble and can compete with children physically, that are aged 5 and 6. It should also be noted that my son loves puzzles and has been able to do full alphabet puzzles for awhile now. He can do any board puzzle and is even able to complete basic box puzzles that have up to 20 pieces.

Important: Please Read

I do not want to mislead anyone. If your child has been clinically diagnosed with any other disorder, than your child will not fall under this category. Although your child may be genius in what they do, they are a genius with a different disorder. The number of late talkers that will become diagnosed with Einstein Syndrome is very small and you would have to personally visit Dr. Camarata to receive the diagnosis.

Einstein syndrome is very specific about the child not having any other diagnosis. Children who have Einstein Syndrome have been tested for every different thing out there...

- Hearing impairments

- Tied tongue

- Analyzed for neurological disorder

- Apraxia

- All other speech and language disorders

- Aspergers

- ADD and ADHD

- Down's Syndrome

- PDD-NOS

- and the number one comparison/companion disorder, autism. Autistic children cannot share this diagnosis.

Checklist of Average Children's Development

12 months - Able to say one to five real words.

14 months - Able to say seven real words although may have 20 words that are only understandable by family. Also, child uses inflection to infer a question.

16 months - Child is using many common consonant sounds (such as t, d, n, w, and h)

18 months - Able to say and use 50 - 75 words

20 months - Child is learning about 10 new words a day.

18 - 24 months - Child is now putting two word combinations together.

25 - 30 months - Child is able to construct sentences and is able to start using proper tenses.

31 - 36 months - Child is able to carry on a conversation at length. Strangers can understand the child.

Info found on http://www.babycenter.com

About Sowell and his books

Many of these children excel in different ares. Some are known to be gifted musically, others are able to use a computer at a very young age and navigate it without trouble. Some of these children are able to read from a very young age.

The two books by Sowell explain this phenomenon with his own research and then with the research performed by leading expert Dr. Camarata. Dr. Camarata in fact will accept visits from parents and their children to have the child diagnosed. His wife works closely with the children and the parents also and they have helped numerous parents learn exactly who their children are and what special gift they possess. Many times parents have been given an incorrect evaluation and speaking with the Camaratas is the most comforting thing they have ever decided to do.

The books have given me a wonderful peace about my son's late talking and it has helped me learn to enjoy his personality without worrying about his speech. I hope these books give you the same.

Learning about the Einstein Syndrome

Do you believe in the Einstein Syndrome?

See results

The Late Talker - The Book

During my quest to help my son, I have searched high and low for information and resources. I have tried to read as much as I can in order to help him best. The best book I have read on the topic was called, "The Late Talker" by Dr. Marilyn C. Again, Lisa F. Geng and Malcolm Nicholl.

This book behaves like a map for a parent who has a late talker. It tells you who you should be seeing, how to get into see the specialists, how to access your insurance, what the different diagnosis could mean, etc. It truly is THE resource for any parent of a late talker. The book is filled predominantly with information about Apraxia, but a lot of the information can be used for the other disorders, at least to help learn how to proceed, etc.

Please, if your child struggles with language, pick up this book.

Einstein Syndrome Guestbook - Questions and Comments

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    • profile image

      Karen 18 months ago

      My late talker can talk but doesn't choose to talk unless he's telling you all the things he knows. He just turned 4. He knows continents , oceans, states and capitals(the shape of the state as well) the provinces of Canada and there capitals. The books of the bible's, all 66 of them in order. All the shapes including shapes I 've never heard of. He's learned it on his own with no help. He reads words that some adults wouldn't know. He's funny and sweet. But he can't tell you what he wants for lunch. Or if wants juice or milk( he will spell what he wants). This is Einstein syndrome....no question. He has figured out a way to learn all these things( plus way more) on his own. It's incredible, but hard. No public school for him, don't exactly know what to do next year!

    • profile image

      marzzzz 2 years ago

      My late talker is 4.5 and he has just started blabbling.He is tested for autism and other developmental delay from 10 different docs and specialists,Thankfully no one has concerns for autism or any other delays.But late talking has created many behaviour issues.He has become shy,emotional.He acts really weird in excitement,he will hit the object with his hand 2,3times and rub his teeths together.I think He has no words to express may thiz myt be hiz way to express or control his feelings.I cry day and night for him.I love him to death but I don't know when will he talk

    • profile image

      marzzzz 2 years ago

      My late talker is 4.5 and he has just started blabbling.He is tested for autism and other developmental delay from 10 different docs and specialists,Thankfully no one has concerns for autism or any other delays.But late talking has created many behaviour issues.He has become shy,emotional.He acts really weird in excitement,he will hit the object with his hand 2,3times and rub his teeths together.I think He has no words to express may thiz myt be hiz way to express or control his feelings.I cry day and night for him.I love him to death but I don't know when will he talk

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      This definitely exists as I had it. I didn't talk a word till almost 4. Then one day out of the blue started to talk in full sentences. Was able to do arithmetic at a few months later. Turned out later on I was gifted in maths to the point of solving some theorems I had never seen which were also figured out by some of the famous greeks. Perfectly normal socially also. This was some years ago and was lucky i wasn't shipped off at age 3 to an institution. Everyone's different and as this is relatively rare this is probably unsurprising.

    • kimberlyschimmel profile image

      Kimberly Schimmel, MLS 4 years ago from Greensboro, NC

      As a church librarian, I have recommended Dr. Sowell's book to a family with an intelligent, late-talking preschooler. I also have one child who did not say anything other than "unnss" until he was almost 5. He now reads in several languages, plays jazz music, and is doing well in chemistry class. I've also had early talkers/readers, so I've learned to accept children as individuals.

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      cleansweeping 4 years ago

      Wow! Interesting! I will need to study up on this topic!

    • KathyBatesel profile image

      KathyBatesel 5 years ago

      I've never heard of this syndrome, and my children and grandkids were all quite vocal at early ages, but it's a fascinating theory. It had me wondering if those who are late talkers are more technically-oriented in their thinking, while early talkers might be more abstract in theirs.

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      huvalbd 5 years ago

      This makes some sense to me. I've worked with people who are breathtakingly brilliant, but technical brilliance is often accompanied by shortcomings in other areas such as social skills.

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      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      I am not trying to be a skeptic amkatee but make sure there is real hearing loss. I had many ear infections as a child, didn't impact my speaking at all. Its not unheard of but its a very unusual situation for a hearing issue to impact speech over a long period. You would need to diagnose an older child capable of telling you what they are hearing.

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 5 years ago

      @amkatee: Can you link your lenses here? I will add them to the list above if they aren't already there. Just post them in the comments section.

      Where I live, it seems most parents are really hesitant to receive support for language and speech. I have met more parents that are reluctant to receive services than are pushing. In fact, a Mom I know had to fight hard with her husband to have her son put into a preschool for delayed children as her son was very far behind in language. Finally her husband agreed, but very reluctantly.

      I have seen a lot more children with behaviour issues request support, more so than language. It would be a benefit to us if I knew more children that had language impairments as I could help grow my sons social group.

      Thanks for sharing.

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 5 years ago

      @amkatee: I know of two children who have suffered from frequency loss (one high and one low) and both have hearing aids to help them hear better. And if I lived in the USA, I would want an appointment with the Camaratas.

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 5 years ago

      @larissalovesleo: In the province I live in, all children have been mainstreamed unless they are essentially a danger to themselves or other children. We no longer have borders or boundaries around a classroom... now this may sound great, but it does present a specific challenge for our situation. If we were able to send my son to a special school, then I would have the opportunity to meet parents of other children with different needs and learn from them. As well, it could benefit my son socially to have the opportunity to develop relationships with children. Right now, he stands out and although children accept him, once parents meet him and realize that he's a bit different, they clam up and no longer offer play dates, etc.

      When I spoke before about him being pulled from class for additional support... that would be one on one aide support. Not a separate classroom for special needs children.

      As for literacy and math... my son can read, but he does not understand language well (In fact, he reads slightly above his peer group), so he can read what he can't understand. However, he has a much harder time actually writing down the words. We are working hard at that. As for math, we are still struggling there. Just this week he was able to understand how to draw a "teen" number and a "twenty" number. So we have some pretty large gaps in his comprehension. I do understand what you mean about IQ though. Although I have not allowed for him to be formally tested, when he does complete tasks that seem IQ related, he performs well.

      And you are right to say that I don't know for sure if it was the cord around his neck. He was also immunized for Hepatitis B the day he was born as that is what they do in the province he was born. So I don't know the cause of his differences, but my heart tells me it was the cord.

      As for knowing when they are young... I think you are right that a lot of people project something on to their child that is simply not there. My sister was worried that her 18 month old only had 6 words or something (I WISH!), but I truly believe that some Moms just know. Most babies babble and play with sounds and my son didn't... at all. Not until about 8 months old did he make a noise that wasn't a cry, screech or mmmm sound. I knew there was something wrong. Babies instinctively play with noise and sound.

      We are doing some further assessing as the school is at a bit of a loss on how to help him the best they can. They want to be able to teach him in a way that he will learn the best, but it is going to take some more professionals to help us figure this little dude out. Again, with everyone being mainstreamed, teachers are left to figure out how to cope and teach children who obviously do not all learn in a sit down desk sort of way... I mean, really??? Who does? But a discussion on our educational system is for another day... lol

      As for where my son is phenomenal... He is an awesome athlete and the kindest hearted kid I have ever met. He is affectionate and loves to make his family feel loved. He has a great sense of humour and has always been a child that you can trust will explore, but only safely within their own boundaries.

      So I do feel like I won the lottery with him.

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 5 years ago

      @larissalovesleo: At least, that is the best I can discern from everything I have read and been told.

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      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      well thank you for not censoring me. I do appreciate it. I don't agree with you at all about parents seeking help. I think this is the wrong thing to do with and to very young children. this is a new phenomenon. some people think learning disabilities are caused by removing kids too early from a secure environment. i don't know if i believe that but it is a theory. boys especially and many girls are not ready for formal schooling at ages 5, 6, even 7. I think 6.5 is very young. do you not think your son will ever overcome his language problems? I do or he wouldn't be in a mainstream class now, if it were that impossible for him to be there. everyplace has something for kids who are especially behind. it may not be for most kids because most kids are not especially behind! being lower than average, someone has to be. Its not the total measure of a person. we all have strengths and weaknesses. can tell you firsthand there are kids who are PHENOMENAL in math and reading with crappy language and while language helps teach anything, these are not overlapping issues. Many kids struggle with reading and math and having delayed language makes it that much harder. I tend to judge intelligence by problem solving ability but that's just me. Again, its not the only measure of a person! why are we so competitive? I don't know if your childs birth situation impacted them, its a common thing to have some oxygen deprivation at birth, cord or delayed exit, its hard to say what happens in that case. but I have seen ridiculously premature babies with delays because of all the IVF and they catch up. 6.5 is not old! give it time. Im in america where we tend to segregate kids who arent going to be good in class and if not, we medicate them. I think this is awful. I am sorry I can't offer support but I will say that you are a GREAT mom for working so hard w your son, enjoy him, he wont be young forever. Be confident that your help is great help because you are so invested in him

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 5 years ago

      @larissalovesleo: In Alberta, Canada, until the child is in Grade 1, any developmental delay (language) is treated as a health issue and drawn from the health care budget. Once a child reaches grade 1, they are then the responsibility of the Educational system and funding is provided through the school districts. So the funding comes from two different spots where I live.

    • profile image

      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      its rare for schools to offer services, parents beat down their doors for them, schools all want to save money. all this spending on 2 and 3 and 4 year olds will dry up money for kids later on. I do encourage parents to all read through IDEA or comparable legislation so they know what their rights are.

    • amkatee profile image

      amkatee 5 years ago

      Other related information would be to read about Strong Willed Children and Natural Late Talkers. I have written lenses related to strong willed children. I hope all of you parents out there find answers.

      And to Larissa the majority of parents are bullied by the school systems. It is the system that tries to label children and will use IDEA to try to get the kid into unneeded therapies and classes. They use IEP's to manipulate and control how the child is treated. Many times children are misdiagnosed or forced into therapies because the parents are not educated enough regarding development or the educational system. Parents' have more power then they realize, but they have to know the system in order to use it effectively.

    • amkatee profile image

      amkatee 5 years ago

      I thought for few years that my daughter was a late talker. I bought those same books and it all made sense. She is very stubborn and precocious. We are still working on a diagnosis, but so far we know she has low frequency hearing loss which is rare and hard to diagnose. I know you mentioned hearing loss in your screenings, but if you have any suspicions keep at it. We have been going to audiologists for years about her ears and they finally picked up on the low frequency loss. I run a group on facebook called Natural Late Talkers. There are several parents with children who display MERLD and apraxia. The Camaratas, from what I hear, are excellent allies to have.

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 5 years ago

      @larissalovesleo: Thank you for sharing your opinion on a wide range of topics on my Squidoo page. Originally, I was going to delete them as I didn't feel that this was the place for such demeaning comments, but I have decided to leave them up. People should be made aware of everyone's opinions... I just wish you could have worded it in a way that didn't come off as demeaning or condescending as it loses his validity. You never mentioned what your background is. You seem well educated in the field and I think that would add some merit to some of the information you shared.

      All I can speak of is my personal experience. My son is now 6.5 and although we had access to some early intervention when he was younger, he continues to struggle with language. Fortunately for him, we did not sit around and wait it out... and it's a good thing because I cannot imagine how much further behind he would be had we not sought services. Sadly, my son was born with the umbilical cord around his neck and deprived of oxygen and now that he is older, we are better able to see how this will impact his life. So, although many other children may be incorrectly labeled or diagnosed, my son has not been. He will struggle his entire life to communicate with the world. He is mainstreamed and in grade 1, but we have to work very hard with him every night to keep up with the other children in subjects such as reading and math. In one of your comments you suggest that there is an overabundance of funding for these kids, but I can assure you, that here in Alberta, that simply isn't the case. Actually, I can kind of see your point a bit in this though... when we went to write my son's IPP, the only way they could provide additional support for literacy and math would be to pull him from regular class. My husband and I felt that him being removed from his peers would do a disservice to him learning better communication skills with his peers, so we do the work at night with him.

      From what I have read of your posts, it does seem that you are not in Alberta as all of the children are mainstreamed (except for some extenuating circumstances) so there are no "special" classes.

      You will likely also be pleased to hear that although my son has a language disorder, none of the professionals we have ever met have suggested autism, PDD-NOS, Aspergers, etc. My son did in fact suffer from sensory issues, but the specialists believed that these were "normal" childhood sensory items and were treated as such. But again, I will agree with you that sometimes these diagnosis are thrown around all to quickly... and you make me question whether it was the fact that we were adamant that we too thought they were "normal" childhood behaviours and did not want any incorrect diagnosis used on our son.

      I do know that there is nothing worse than not knowing how to help your child that is struggling in some way. I would rather parents seek support and help, rather than question their choices after it is too late for intervention to make a difference. I would rather we err on the side of caution, then not look at anyone. Because the reality is, the children that really do need those supports would not receive them.

      So do I feel I need a support group? Damn right! This has been a very hard, very lonely road. I wish I knew someone who had to deal with IPPs, SLPs, Aids, etc, and navigate the educational system in my area, so that I could serve my son better.

      Thank you again for your opinion. I think you should start some of your own Squidoo Lenses if you haven't and post your opinions on them. I would be more than happy to link to them.

    • profile image

      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      lets start a support group PARENTS IN NEED OF ANY DIAGNOSIS. does this make your child better? what if a doctor, ten, told you nothing was wrong? would you keep going to doctors? what if 10 doctors told you 10 different things? this happens often because we shouldn't be diagnosing such young kids.stop with childhood apraxia, see my post on this. there is such a thing as MIXED EXPRESSIVE RECEPTIVE LANGUAGE DISORDER/DELAY and its deliberately vague because we do not understand it in young children well!!!!!

    • profile image

      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      @debnet: listen to your gut? I know 1000 parents whose gut told them to wait and then some busybody said worry worry worry. your gut has been compromised by the autism industry and the like. real disorders are VERY RARE. everyone would notice, not just you.

    • profile image

      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      this is all junk science. the numbers for asd will keep increasing until they hit 10% roughly the number of late talking kids. if you keep analyzing your kids, not tolerating tantrums and personality and shyness and aloof personalities, you will be miserable. how does a diagnosis make someone feel better? its someones opinion. know someone asocial? just call them autistic. I think 5 year olds are babies. what happened to childhood? we would be overrun with useless members of society if all our disordered kids didn't grow up to lead relatively normal lives. guess what? your kid doesn't have to be an einstein NOT to be disordered. there are crackpots who think einstein is autistic, that magnus carlsen is autistic. if you don't make eye contact, your autistic. if you really talk late, you're autistic. if you're a loner, autistic. if you're wild, add. listen, kids DO have weaknesses and some have hypersensitivities. but they're your genes! if you're compulsive, you'll probably have a compulsive kid. if you're an einstein,your kid will probably be very bright. other than that, stop the madness, enjoy your kids. if you keep diagnosing them and turning them over to therapists who annoy the kids and don't help them progress but make parents feel better, you're going to be miserable and so will your kids. you are the best helper for your own children. they have only one childhood. it doesn't belong in endless therapy and evaluation. if none of this existed, you would enjoy your life. the dirty little secret is there is NO study showing ABA resulted in any dramatic improvement in verbal behavior or social skills, only academic testing and that's because these kids are stuck identifying pictures for 40 hours a week. the ABA test group was with TALKING kids, they didn't take any nontalkers. the supposed deficient group went mainstream but with more services than the other kids, that's all. If you think any of this crap is helpful SIT IN ON A SESSION.

      ive only seen therapy "help" kids who didn't need it, wow, miracle or kids whose parents never did a single thing. enjoy your kids!!!!!!!!! let them enjoy life. a lot of kids are late in a lot of things, some very late. not all kids will be geniuses athletes or popular. you wont change this! give them moral guidance and encouragement. help them find peers with common interests. know that some kids freak out more than others and that at the end of the day, some of us get angel kids, some of us not and some kids require more creative discipline than others. enjoy your kids, stop the madness. I haven't met one parent who defends endless services that ever picked up any slack with their kids, they just say woe is me, victim victim. you're not a victim. your kids are a blessing. go visit kids with real autism or paralysis. stop the madness!!!

    • profile image

      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      these diagnoses are all junk in my opinion. my favorite is childhood apraxia. apraxia is very very rare in children. but now it's a common diagnosis like autism spectrum. if you people ever saw real autism you'd feel ashamed for allowing your kids to be lumped. most kids under 3 have problems with motor planning their speech, it eases as kids get older. real apraxia is extremely rare in kids, its usually resulting from brain damage in adults from blood stoppage or injury.

    • profile image

      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      @littlestep: she's very young. if you keep having her evaluated she will be labelled with spd or asd or something of that nature. she's VERY YOUNG. every kid doesn't develop the same. if you compare or let other people compare you will be miserable. she hardly sounds retarded or disordered to me.

    • profile image

      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      ok, um, most kids arent having conversations at 2 and a half to 3! who makes these charts! if your kid is verbal and improving, don't let anyone freak you out. In the old days, we didn't analyze kids and screen them all the time or segregate them. real autism is a rare disease. being less than social or communicative is not autism in my opinion but any weird kid who freaks out a lot or has poor language or social skills is pdd or on spectrum and the parents get a zillion dollars in useless services, which only help kids who seriously never had a problem to begin with. in my estimation by the second grade, most kids are entirely conversational. yes it takes that long for some kids esp boys to catch up. big deal. let me tell you autism spectrum and add cult members, you will NEVER be happy with your kids until they are cured of basically, themselves! Half the adults you know have add or asd. That's why its an epidemic. its half of us! by the way, the marilyn again book stinks. the sowell book is decent not great but at least it provides a much needed alternative perspective. 15% of our kids have diagnoses of some kind, come on! are we all so disordered and mentally ill? somehow we get by. spare me the junk science. live life, enjoy life. teach your kids as best you can. be patient. there are SO MANY OTHER VERY LATE TALKERS OUT THERE! lets stop making special educators and speech therapists and occupational therapists and physical therapists rich. special ed should be for real disability not teachers who can't cope with a diverse group. and speech can be for articulation and ot's and pts can go back to working with stroke victims not two year olds who arent quite jumping yet or who scream when they see a clown or when their parents say no. No one will ever be diagnosis free. some shrink will diagnose you. How can you let other people do this to your kids? Parents are really offending me. who is on the side of the children?

    • profile image

      larissalovesleo 5 years ago

      ok, um, most kids arent having conversations at 2 and a half to 3! who makes these charts! if your kid is verbal and improving, don't let anyone freak you out. In the old days, we didn't analyze kids and screen them all the time or segregate them. real autism is a rare disease. being less than social or communicative is not autism in my opinion but any weird kid who freaks out a lot or has poor language or social skills is pdd or on spectrum and the parents get a zillion dollars in useless services, which only help kids who seriously never had a problem to begin with. in my estimation by the second grade, most kids are entirely conversational. yes it takes that long for some kids esp boys to catch up. big deal. let me tell you autism spectrum and add cult members, you will NEVER be happy with your kids until they are cured of basically, themselves! Half the adults you know have add or asd. That's why its an epidemic. its half of us! by the way, the marilyn again book stinks. the sowell book is decent not great but at least it provides a much needed alternative perspective. 15% of our kids have diagnoses of some kind, come on! are we all so disordered and mentally ill? somehow we get by. spare me the junk science. live life, enjoy life. teach your kids as best you can. be patient. there are SO MANY OTHER VERY LATE TALKERS OUT THERE! lets stop making special educators and speech therapists and occupational therapists and physical therapists rich. special ed should be for real disability not teachers who can't cope with a diverse group. and speech can be for articulation and ot's and pts can go back to working with stroke victims not two year olds who arent quite jumping yet or who scream when they see a clown or when their parents say no. No one will ever be diagnosis free. some shrink will diagnose you. How can you let other people do this to your kids? Parents are really offending me. who is on the side of the children?

    • profile image

      lifeandchocolate 5 years ago

      Just came across this. I just wrote an article called Smart Children Who Talk-Late. I think this is fascinating. I really enjoyed your take on this subject. I would like to link to your article from my article if that is okay with you. If you want to add a link to my article here it is for your review. http://kelleyward.hubpages.com/hub/Children-Who-Ta...

      Thanks!

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      moonlitta 5 years ago

      As other comments pointed out your page could save lots of trouble to lots of families.

    • Heather426 profile image

      Heather Burns 6 years ago from Wexford, Ireland

      I have never heard of this! But I think lots of things are possible. My sister was autistic, late talker, slow in academics, musically gifted, played everything by ear.(piano)

    • profile image

      gummibear737 6 years ago

      My daughter is almost three and a half years now. We started to think that something was wrong about a year ago when we noticed that she was delayed in what would be considered normal speech development. Also, she was a very uncooperative and stubborn child. Sometimes she would not acknowledge what you were asking her to do and was prone to monstrous tantrums when she did not get what she wanted. She also refused to sit still for anything that did not engage her. We had been doing potty training with her since she was 1 and even though she knew what it was for and what to do, she just refused to use it. Finally she was not at all interested in playing with other children, preferring instead her own company and games. At the same time I looked at her and also saw a wonderfully intelligent child with an incredible memory. By two she had mastered the basics of using an ipad. She knew how to navigate the entire operating system so that she could play her games, cartoons, songs and even use YouTube. She was also an affectionate child who seemed to develop emotionally in a fairly normal way.

      As parents are prone to do we started doing our internet research on what could be the issue and began to see that some of her symptoms could be indicative of an autism spectrum disorder. To make matters worse, around this time we started taking her to a pre-school where we were getting disturbing reports from the teachers and "specialists". One of them called us in one day to tell us that she is definitely autistic with a possibility of mental retardation. I'm sure you can imagine what this did to our family.

      So we started the process of visiting doctors. We visited 4 Child Psychiatrists and 3 Child Psychologists and to our relief (and also surprise) all of them have indicated that she does not present as a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder and in fact had nothing organically wrong. Maybe ADHD but too early to tell. This was good news of sorts but underneath it all we still didn't have an explanation to why this was going on. Why wasn't she talking more? Why wasn't she answering our questions? Why didn't she want to play with the other children?

      It was around this time that I came across the idea of "Einstein Syndrome". Myself I had completed a bachelor's degree in Molecular Biology and had completed Medical School (though i don't practice today), so I am a believer in the scientific process and am by nature very suspicious of non-mainstream medical theories. I am also very aware of things like the Forer Effect so I set about reading into this with a great deal of skepticism.

      What I learned about this blew me away. Everything I read explained my own current situation, including the family history part. Myself I am a high IQ, highly analytical person and so is my father. Turns out we both also spoke "late" though back then it wasn't a big deal.

      Fast forward one year and my daughter is progressing nicely. She began talking more at age 3 and has progressed a lot in six months since then. Her vocabulary is very advanced although her grammar lags. We've also finally resolved the potty training issue. Its almost like one day she just decided "Okay, time to finally use the potty". She sings every song she hears. In fact she sings some songs which we haven't played for her in over a year. Neither my wife nor I are worried any longer about something being wrong with our child. We understand that she has a different developmental path than others.

      My take on the "Einstein Syndrome": First of all, it is not a medical diagnosis but rather an observation of a developmental phenomenon. In my opinion, this phenomenon is described in enough detail that it cannot be considered a result of the Forer effect. While this wouldn't stand up as a scientific paper, it doesn't really try to nor should it try. The term is not clinically significant because there is no pathology involved. As such I don't think it will ever be something that will be studied to great lengths. In the past children who developed this way were just seen as developing differently. Second, this is an important concept because it can save numerous parents the heartache and anguish of thinking that something is wrong with your child but not being able to know what or how to help them.

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      HulaHoops LM 6 years ago

      @sheepgal: What a great story! Thank you so much for sharing. =)

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      sheepgal 6 years ago

      My son was into trouble all the time. Just wouldn't take no for an answer. We had to put special locks on the doors because he knew at 18 months that he could push a chair to the door, put 3 encyclopedias on top, climb up and undo the chain, all while I was busy with laundry or in the bathroom. He even pushed the chair back and and put away the books. I only found out how he did this because he put the books back upside down. He did not speak except for the the sound Da. It was Da for everything. We took him to speech therapy for over a year and then to a child psychiatrist who said he was borderline genius and that his body would catch up with his brain but that we needed to challenge him. That some of these gifted children grow up learning to outsmart the system and turn into successful criminals. At age 5 I was reading an article to my husband about the drivers license renewal going up to $25 for 5 years and the boy said 'but that's cheap, only $5 a year'. Now where did he learn division? He could also open his sisters grade 4 math book and do the work accurately and he was only in kindergarten. He has a photographic memory even now at age 32 and he now has 3 children of his own, all with delayed speech. We laugh because he made us so tired as parents that we prayed he would have a child such as himself to pay him back and now he has 3! He always had a seat next to the teacher in elementary school because the work was boring and he liked to be 'class clown' Funny he spent all of high school skipping class and always squeeked by with a B. He could have been a straight A student but he enjoyed the 'challenge' of not going to school and not getting caught. lol And now they have name for it!

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      HulaHoops LM 6 years ago

      @littlestep: WOW!!! What a story! And you sound like such an amazing mom! I am no expert on the Einstein Syndrome, so I do not want to suggest that perhaps your daughter does or does not share these characteristics. But if your child is excelling at this point after years of limited speech or being nonverbal, she certainly does match what is described in the book. WOW! What an amazing story! You may want to search out Dr. Camarata as he does meet with children and parents. There is even a yahoo group dedicated to his book and his work. I'd search it out and ask those parents over there. Much more knowledgeable than me. Again, WOW!!!

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      HulaHoops LM 6 years ago

      @Akitajitsu: You said it perfectly... parents need to listen to their gut. At 7 months, I knew my son was a built a bit different and here we are 5 years later and my suspicions have been proven. Parents, listen to your heart.

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      HulaHoops LM 6 years ago

      @Akitajitsu: Thanks for your thoughts. :) My SLP did think it was apraxia until he got a bit older and learned more words. She then eliminated apraxia from being a possible diagnosis. He was given a new diagnosis at his end of year conference and that is simply "Expressive Language Disorder".

      We just saw a pediatrician who specializes in children with developmental delays and disorders and he agreed with the Expressive Language Disorder. So I feel even more confident about the diagnosis.

      However, we do see a new SLP in the near future and I will happily hear a new opinion on the diagnosis. I certainly want the most accurate diagnosis for my son and I am certain I have gotten all the right players on his team.

      Perhaps my son does have apraxia, but perhaps too my son doesn't. I'll update after our next SLP apt.

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      littlestep 6 years ago

      My Child, At 18 months could not speak her needs, do simple step instructions. She would not respond to her name called. She used unintelligent jargon. Frightened of any toy with a face "except one Bear which was made like a blanket - she named it Mimi. Almost the only word she would utter. She did not have acceptable play tactics with other children-just seemed to not understand the "unwritten rules of play", but loved children! She could work simple child computer web cites and simple hand held games starting at age 2. Worked puzzles, shape sorters, mr. potato head etc. Gives me penetrating stares often avoids eye contact with others. She started receiving speech and developmental therapy through a State program. She passed a hearing test. I had her tested by a child psychologist at 21 months and was told "let's wait and see". I have to say that I never sat down, I would always try to help her. She would take my hand and walk me to the cabinet or what-ever and place my hand upon it, then I would have to start by elimination of its contents to see what it was she needed. I took pictures of her favorite things - so she could selected from them. She learned simple sign language and used it. Just before age 3 she was evaluated by a top Speech therapist in the area for entry into public school and she told me that she had never seen a child with such a severe delay as she that had not already shut down. She started preschool on her third birthday (at present she has went through the preschool program 2 1/2 times now) . When she started school she did not respond to "wh" questions. Did not say her name. - as stated above. but Started using two limited words simple sentences. She was not toilet trained until 3 1/2 yrs old. At 4 years old her pediatrician suggested she had PDD-NOS. Gave me a referral to child evaluation center. I refused to send her at this time. Instead, I took her back and had her tested by her child psychologist and was told "she just doesn't fit autism", "I don't know what to think of her", "let's wait and see", "bring her back when she is 5". Her pediatrician later suggested she was Mentally Retarded and I should just except it. I would not. (thank goodness pediatricians can not give a diagnosis to this!!) I called her child psychologist and asked if this was likely and was I in denial. He replied "It's too soon to diagnosis, Let's wait and see, bring her back when she is 5." I "knew" her without using words. I just knew in my heart that all she needed constant interaction. Each day after school I would ask her what she did that day her response would be "school" as it was with most every question I would ask her-she would just repeat the major word, but I could see what was not spoken in her face and in the way she held herself. She was most always a Happy child!! One day after school she got off the bus crying I asked her what was wrong-to my surprise- she answered "Ms SO through my donut in the trash" I Cried TOO. After that day she started using more and more words and called her self her NAME!! At Christmas we talked about Santa coming and at her suggestion put out milk and cookies!! I was never sure that we would ever do this together - My heart was exploding! Since Christmas the turn-of-about have been amazing!! She can say and talk about most everything!! Her pediatrician is without words-at her 5 year check-up she said "isn't this great all she has is a stuffy nose!" I asked her of her former statement and she replied that she was not God and can not judge. The only remains of this .... She has a very short list of foods she will eat and is sometimes brand sensitive ((example - pancakes and sausage (only preformed frozen sausage), pizza (only Totino's pizza) chocolate pudding, yogurt, fruity pebbles with milk and cheerios without milk. Her food list is not much longer than what has been mentioned but with same scenarios. I do fix her a small plate of what we are eating and purchase her a lunch at school each day just incase she ever wants to try something new. Her Teacher says she fixes her plate but she never eats except for Pancake day. ((I do send her a sausage (her favorite) to school everyday)) She repeats Momma, Momma, Momma, Mommy --Momma "constantly" after most everything she says. (music to my ears!!) I have noticed her slowing down a little on the momma's lately. She speaks of herself in 1st person and uses "we" for "me".(she has told me - she has an imaginary friend with same name as her) She uses he and she or him and her in wrong context but does know the difference between girl and boy. She frequently Panics if things are not just as she thinks they should be, she is neat compared to most children her age, she will occasionally spin or walk in circles when upset, nervous or bored. She is now going into kindergarten the the school is wanting to test her for communication status her speech therapist there thinks she may not know the difference between yes and no) - I know she does. If you ask her for example "are you a boy" she will state No - Girl. I am her mother and I know her best. I am going to have her tested for the third time by her child psychologist again this summer. I am very anguish to know what he has to say about her this time. I continue with other evaluations elsewhere if this is his suggestion or if I ever feel the desperate need. This child psychologist of hers does not take insurance so it is expensive but I have been frightened that she would receive a wrong diagnoses at such a young age and she would have to live with that label for the rest of her life. I like the privacy of this. She has a team working for her, her family, teachers, therapist, etc. I am grateful! Whatever was/is going on with her is diminishing and she has largely learned how to control herself. She has a fantastic imagination! She knows so many many many things - like she has been taking it all in like a sponge all this time. There are still times when I do not understand what she is trying to tell me - and this is can be frustrating for her. I continue to give her all the help I can and look for new ways to help her. My prayers have been answered and I have been blessed -- She now talks !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!""ALL THE TIME""!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! She has an excellent memory can sit at the computer for long periods of time utilizing child web cites without much adult interaction. My father is an pilot and inventor and held patents as was his father before him. I have many relitives that are musicians. Knowing about the Einstein Syndrome has given me hope. Do you think she is a likely candidate?

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      tommyda 6 years ago

      @Akitajitsu: Amen.

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      Jen 6 years ago from California

      @HulaHoops LM: Actually, if your son has been diagnosed with an expressive language disorder and motor-planning problems, then I would suggest finding a speech pathologist who is very familiar with apraxia. Not all SLPs are familiar with apraxia and are not qualified to diagnose it. By definition, apraxia is an "expressive language disorder" & a "motor-planning disorder". The child does not need to have any real "words" in order to be diagnosed (words would help of course), but a qualified SLP should be able to tell if your child's therapy should be geared towards someone with apraxia. Speech therapy for apraxia is very different than therapy for other speech disorders - without proper therapy, the child probably won't make any progress.

      It's possible that is contributing to your son's lack of progress. My son's first school SLP did not know how to deal with apraxia and he actually regressed dramatically while she was working with him. He's made great progress since switching therapists!

      Anyway, I thought I'd comment on the motor-planning issue. I know you stated that you had seen quite a few doctors and therapists, but it sounds like maybe you need to seek out someone who is very familiar with apraxic children (if you haven't already). Perhaps your son does have apraxia and no one is catching it (which seems to happen frequently...I think we simply lucked out in getting set up with an SLP who was trained to deal with apraxic kids).

    • Akitajitsu profile image

      Jen 6 years ago from California

      "Einstein was a late talker and look how he turned out" was one of the most common comments I got from friends, family & even my pediatrician when I expressed concerned about my son's speech (or lack thereof). My son clearly didn't have autism, so everyone assumed he was just his lack of speech was due to his mind being busy working on physical things.

      This turns out to be the case for many kids - they end up talking in their own time and there's no reason to worry. But it is very important for parents to realize that sometimes a speech delay is more than just a delay - it's a neurological disorder. I firmly believe that parents need to follow their gut when it comes to their ids. (lensrolled to my Living with Childhood Apraxia of Speech lens).

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      Debbie 6 years ago from England

      Interesting indeed. I work in educational psychology but hadn't heard of Einstein Syndrome... maybe I should explore! Lensrolled to Selective Mutism and thank you so much for featuring it here and for your kind comments. Blessed by a Squid Angel ;)

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 6 years ago

      @tommyda: Thank you again for your comments. Unfortunately, they are coming across as both mean spirited and terribly condescending. I accept that you don't think that the Einstein Syndrome exists, so we will have to agree to disagree. There are many others that would agree with both of us so it's silly to continue repeating what has already been said.

      Also, please don't try to diagnose my son via the internet. My son has seen five different Speech Pathologists and was registered at a special school because he was below the 1st percentile for speech. He was not diagnosed with apraxia because his sounds are almost always the same.

      As for the people that find this webpage... most come here as a result for searching for either Dr. Sowell or Dr Camarata or for the term Einstein Syndrome... these are not people searching for speech issues, these are people interested in something they have already heard about. It is not my job to educate people about language, again, I will repeat... I wrote this out of interest on the topic and the book I read... I am not in the medical field.

      As for your own daughter, I extend a motherly hug to you. For me it has been a very hard journey with my son and it is very far from over. I will admit that I find it surprising that they would diagnose a child as young as your daughter with apraxia, but that is only based on the children I have been surrounded by with various speech issues. My son, as I mentioned earlier, has been followed since 9 months and only received a diagnosis at age 4.5. Heck, my son didn't even have a word at 17 months. lol Be grateful that you have an answer and know how to work with her to help her along her journey.

      If you are familiar with Squidoo, then you should prepare a page on Apraxia and share your story and what you have learned. You are well written and would be able to write with a lot of experience with the disorder. I did a quick search to see if there are pages existing already and I found these:

      https://hubpages.com/family/childhoodapraxiaofspee

      http://www.squidoo.com/childhood-apraxia-of-speech

      and one not specific to apraxia

      https://hubpages.com/health/speech-delay

      As for your snide comment about wikipedia... I will again have to disagree because I think caring parents exhaust all resources. Apart from all the books I have read, internet reading I have done, courses I have personally attended to help him with speech (Hannan-It Takes Two program being one for those that are interested) we have had involved with my son: 5 Speech Pathologists, 2 Pediatricians, 3 General Practitioners, 2 Occupational Therapists, 3 Psychologists and 3 personal aids to assist with language while at school. He also sees a Chiropractor for Cranial shifting to help shift the skull near the Broca's Area. He also sees a Naturopath and receives accutonics to help stimulate speech... and on the Naturopath's suggestion we have removed all gluten and dairy for over a year now. We are now waiting to see if we can get into a very special clinic where they will do some really intensive work with him. But as you can imagine the wait list is long and there is no guarantee.

      I made that laundry list to illustrate that caring parents never quit. Writing something on this page isn't going to flag a person and make them realize that their child may have a speech disorder... I learned about Einstein Syndrome but never stopped searching for answers. Who would do that?

      As for catching children up... you are simply referring to your personal situation. Some children unfortunately never catch up, even with early intervention... My son, as it stands right now, being one of them... Even with all this early intervention and all the practice we do at home, he has only moved to the 3rd percentile.

      I really do hope you create some awesome lenses. If you do, I'd be more than happy to feature them on my page and send people over to you. I really do need to update this page a bit. I created it about three years ago if I'm remembering correctly and have only made minor changes to it along the way.

      I do want to say that I think your daughter is lucky to have you by her side fighting for what she needs. Because even with all the intervention in the world, without a caring family to support and continue the intervention, all would be lost. And you certainly strike me as a Mom that is going to battle for her little girl.

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      tommyda 6 years ago

      "...expressive language disorder and motor muscle planning disorders". The very definition of Apraxia of Speech.

      Parents who care are not seeking sound medical information on Wikipedia.

      I am not saying someone (a parent) doesn't care, but this avenue is a dead end. Many of these people should not be finding nor feeling relief here. They should be continuing their journey (search). I don't want to sound offensive but this is not the answer to their problems. If they are worried to the point they are surfing around for possibilities...they need to keep looking!

      I for one have a daughter diagnosed @ 17 months with Apraxia of Speech based solely on sounds and the words she understands, such as pointing at objects when she is asked to.

      Apraxia of speech should be talked about much more on your site, rather than Aspergers, which is much more obvious than Apraxia. Weeks and months count in the diagnosis of Apraxia, so early intervention can "catch" these children up.

      Please do not take my suggestions and comments as inflammatory or mean spirited... but I think the "Einstein Syndrome" diagnosis is a feel good diagnosis that is quite frankly ...hoakum.

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 6 years ago

      @tommyda: As for the medical community not recognizing this as a syndrome, I am not in the medical field and I do not have the answers to this. I do know that many people have sought out Dr Camarata to meet and test their children and time and time again he diagnosis children with Einstein Syndrome, and sure enough, they begin to speak at a much later age. So it has brought some parents answers to their questions.

      However, as you have pointed out, it is a very small minority of children that would receive this diagnosis. And perhaps some parents may have their heart set on this and then find out there are other issues that their child may have. I think instead of criticizing people for searching out all answers, we should applaud people for caring so much about their children that they look into all avenues.

      Anyone that has a child that struggles with language knows the long, arduous journey that these children have. My child is not yet five years old and is already segregated by his classmates parents as they do not understand that because just because he can't communicate in words as well as their children, does not mean that he doesn't understand... or even more painful for me as a parent... they don't recognize when he has been purposely avoided and not invited to join the other children.

      So if a parent stumbles upon this and finds my site as a result of wanting more information about the book, then I encourage them to read it and continue researching and doing what they know is best for their child.

      Sound production can be a variety of issues. Here is a link to a wikipedia page that provides a starting point for speech sound disorders. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_sound_disorder

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 6 years ago

      @tommyda: Thanks for your comments. If you are referring to my Squidoo lens making it "ok to just think your kid is a genius", I am sorry that you feel I am excusing speech pathologist and a doctor's review. My son first saw a Speech Pathologist at the age of 9 months, and today, almost at the age of six, he continues to seek much needed care from them. My son has an expressive language disorder and motor muscle planning disorders.

      This page solely exists as I found these books extremely interesting. It was simply sharing something I discovered along the path to discovering why my son was able to meet all other milestones, but not his speech. In fact, I think most parents are like me and exhaust all resources when their child is not performing "up to standard".

      As for looking into speech apraxia, that is a great suggestion, but a child can only be diagnosed with apraxia if they have words to use. Many children that have Einstein Syndrome do not actually have any words. There are many other disorders that I could list that a child could have. Again, this isn't a medical page, it is a page about a book I read. I will comment more on your other post.

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      tommyda 6 years ago

      It should also be noted that "Einstein Syndrome" is NOT a diagnosis, you will NOT go to a specialist and hear, "Don't worry, Jonny just has Einstein Syndrome". It is not recognized by any medical group/body. It is a term coined by an author. I noticed some mentioned their children are having problems with certain sounds etc. These are signs of Speech Apraxia. Thank You.

    • profile image

      tommyda 6 years ago

      If your concerned about speech, you should look into speech apraxia. this site seems to make it OK to just think your kid is a genius, when you should be seeking a speech therapist.

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 6 years ago

      @lilymom24: Thanks for the comment. Although there may be some distinct similarities between Einstein Syndrome and Asperger's, they are in fact very different. Although some children with Asperger's may speak late, it is not a requirement for diagnosis, where all children that have Einstein Syndrome speak very late. Perhaps I should add a section that addresses this.

    • HulaHoops LM profile image
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      HulaHoops LM 6 years ago

      @UKGhostwriter: Why would anyone have told you that? So happy to hear that she is able to communicate now.

    • lilymom24 profile image

      lilymom24 6 years ago

      I have never heard of Einstein Syndrome but it sounds very similar to Asperger's Syndrome.

    • UKGhostwriter profile image

      UKGhostwriter 6 years ago

      we were told myda ughter would never walk or talk ..she won't shut up and we can't keep up with her walking!

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      Linda Hahn 6 years ago from California

      All children grow at their own pace - good lens.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      Thank you for sharing good information, you got Interesting stuff in this lens.

    • jp1978 profile image

      jp1978 7 years ago

      I was a late-talker. Or so they say.

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      anonymous 8 years ago

      The Childrens and Parenting Group that this lens belonged to has survived all the recent changes on Squidoo and is now a Lensography. This lens is now featured at Children and Parenting HQ.

      And of course this visit gives me the chance to Bless this excellent lens.

    • CherylK profile image

      Cheryl Kohan 8 years ago from Minnesota

      This is such useful information. I know a child who is not speaking well at age 3 but not sure if this is why. I can understand some of what he says but not everything. He's been working with a therapist for more than a year which has helped tremendously.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Just back to say I am very proud of all the lenses in the Children and Parenting Group. Thank you for joining anfd for sharing your experiences, which I hope will help other parents.

    • jp1978 profile image

      jp1978 8 years ago

      My parents say I only started talking around four years old. I don't believe them, but I am a bit of a genius. :)

    • tandemonimom lm profile image

      tandemonimom lm 8 years ago

      Very clear and informative lens. I had a super late talker but though he is very bright I doubt it was ES, since his toddler stammer lasted years past the usual age. Thanks for the info! 5*****

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      anonymous 8 years ago

      Welcome to the Children and Parenting Group

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      Joan4 9 years ago

      Very interesting and informative. Lensrolling to Kids with Special Needs.

      Great lens!

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      Nancy Tate Hellams 9 years ago from Pendleton, SC

      very interesting and informaive. I had not heard that terminology before but makes sense. Thank you for sharing.

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      I had never heard of this condition before. I would be really pleased if you would submit it to the Children and Parenting group on Squidoo.

    • ZenandChic profile image

      Patricia 9 years ago

      Interesting lens. Maybe your son will be an Einstein. Sounds like he is advanced for his age already. My user name is the title of one of my poems and books

      Jewels of Awe. Thank you for your compliments!

    • mistyblue75605 lm profile image

      mistyblue75605 lm 9 years ago

      My son would not talk at all until he was 1 1/2 and even then he would say one word and then never say it again.... He is now 4 1/2 years old and strangers still can't understand him. heck sometimes I can't. But he is smart as a whip so I am not worried. He has a memory like an elephant. He remembers the smallest detail about anything even from more than a couple of years ago. He is my special little man! Thanks for the info! 5* original!

    • Mortira profile image

      Mortira 9 years ago

      My family was worried when my nephew wasn't talking at 2 years old. He was eventually diagnosed with ASD, but thanks to therapy his diagnosis has been all but reversed. As a parent, I wish you the best of luck and success with your son!

    • EuroSquid LM profile image

      EuroSquid LM 9 years ago

      This is cool. There is so much I didn't know about babies and their vocabularies. As for Einstein, I have often noticed that VERY intelligent people suffer socially. I have often wondered if they are intelligent because of their social exclusions (that is, because they do not spend a lot of time with other people, they have more time to develop their thoughts) or if they suffer socially because of their intelligence. Could late speaking be related to social issues?

      A lot of interesting questions, thank you for this 5* lens

    • Spook LM profile image

      Spook LM 9 years ago

      Great lens and I hope your son turns out to be gifted.

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      Medicinemanwriting1 9 years ago

      Thanks for the info. Our 7 year is profoundly deaf, however, some of the things you describe here are her behavior. However, as best as I can see, she does not fit in the Einstein syndrome description. She is a whiz on the computer, not uncommon with deaf children, and I have to watch her closely, otherwise she is into some of my files. I am writing learning programs for her in MS Excel, and she loves it.

      We just had a new addition to the family on Nov 2. She was a healthy 7lb 8oz, 21 inch baby. Soon I will be starting a daily blog about her daily events. I am making daily journal entries in MS Word, and will post it when I get my website set up. The site will have a special blog dedicated to her as well as one dedicated to our 7 year old.

      Anyway, thanks for the new info. I will be researching it more.

      Best wishes to you and your family.

    • AlisonMeacham profile image

      AlisonMeacham 9 years ago

      My middle son was a late talker and I think he had many of the characteristics you describe here. I had heard that Einstein was a late talker. My son particularly loves puzzles and was able to put a US puzzle together when he was about 3 and could identify the shapes of the states - whichever way up they were. He certainly has some interesting talents!

    • michelledurakis profile image

      michelledurakis 9 years ago

      Great lens, My son is late talker. They do say this is more common in boys. Very informative

      lens.

    • allinfoisfree profile image

      allinfoisfree 9 years ago

      I think my first, 6 years old, and now the second daughter, 19 months, are both late talkers, but I don't worry about it. We taught them about 8 signs in sign language so we could always know their basics, hungry, thirsty, hot, cold, change(diaper), bath, bread, yes and no and we were told that when children learn sign language they tend to talk later. (the second one was signing at 5 months.) Children develop at different rates, so I'm not worried about either of them. The oldest one just has problems with her "th", and use to have problems with her "f"'s. She'll grow out of it.

      It's just some people wanting to put a label on everything (every human condition) right? Even the way kids mature.

    • dc64 lm profile image

      dc64 lm 9 years ago

      I've always been intrigued by the labels they gave Einstein in school, I bet those teachers had a lot of "crow" to eat after his success! As parents, we know how some children develop in different stages, with different strengths. I'm sure your child has a few wonderful surprises up his sleeve for you.

    • MargoPArrowsmith profile image

      MargoPArrowsmith 9 years ago

      Great lens, and I always appreciate people who give parents the ability to relax, while not abdicating parenting.

      Good Enough Parenting starts with a great story that I use with parenting groups about relaxing. It speaks (no pun intended) specifically to late talking

      5 stars to you!

    • Cari Kay 11 profile image

      Kay 9 years ago

      I love Thomas Sowell's writings and have communicated back and forth via email with him in the past about his writings on autism. Good information here!

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      anonymous 9 years ago

      Now you've got me wondering about my late talking granddaughter! Hmm! I wonder!

    • profile image

      GrowWear 9 years ago

      Very helpful lens. Certainly gives worried parents another avenue to explore. :)

    • Wendy L Henderson profile image

      Wendy Henderson 9 years ago from PA

      Excellent lens. I am now a fan! All 3 of my kids were late talkers and all three had speech problem. Guess what?! They turned out just fine. As a matter a fact all three are on the honor role. 5stars!

    • jimmielanley profile image

      Jimmie Lanley 9 years ago from Memphis, TN, USA

      You're officially blessed!

      I have a relative who would probably have been diagnosed with this. He's a normal adult! Some would simply call this a late bloomer. Thanks for sharing this important information. Parents can be so competitive with their children's accomplishments. We are all different and mature at different rates.

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      Wellness101 9 years ago

      I used to work as a babysitter some years ago in New York, and I remember one of the kids I baby-sat definitely had the Einstein syndrome has he was almost four and barely spoke, yet he was very smart.

      GREAT INFO!

    • giacombs-ramirez profile image

      gia combs-ramirez 9 years ago from Montana

      Meg Blackburn in her book, The Children of Now, also presents a new age perspective of late talking children. Great lens and info.

    • triathlontraini1 profile image

      triathlontraini1 9 years ago

      That's very interesting! I know parents that are worried about their infant speaking late, but this is definite food for thought. :)

      Great job!

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      anonymous 9 years ago

      I use ebay many years, and will use it :) There are a lot of good things for life.

    • LauraMarie LM profile image

      LauraMarie LM 9 years ago

      Excellent lens here!! I studied psychology so I used to know a little about the significance of children talking late