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Inspiration for Busy Moms

Updated on April 21, 2015
Even the Best Mom needs a Little Quiet Time
Even the Best Mom needs a Little Quiet Time | Source

Devotions for Women

These devotions written especially for mothers are meant to inspire and encourage you! Being a Christian mother is often a thankless task, the world doesn't share our values and we're tempted to give in to the pressure.

These writings are meant to encourage you to continue in your journey to raise children who love Jesus Christ as well as inspire you to become the best person you can be in Him. In addition to the devotions you'll find on this page, look for links to more than six other pages with more short readings to help you on your way.

Devotions You'll find on This Page

  • The Season of "I Want"
  • I've Been There Before
  • Good News for Parenting Mistakes
  • To Raise a Child Like Jesus
  • The Beauty of Sabbath

How can people who live in so much abundance want so much?
How can people who live in so much abundance want so much? | Source

Forty Devotions for Mom (on Amazon)

Quiet Times for Busy Moms
Quiet Times for Busy Moms

This book is available in print and for your Kindle.

Check out Barnes and Noble if you need it for your Nook!

With more than forty devotions you'll find something for nearly every occasion!

 

It's the The Season of "I Want"

16 Rejoice always, 17 pray continually, 18 give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus. 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

Between the middle of October and the end of December, the United States becomes a nation of I want. From age 3 to 103, we can hear the faint chants . . . I want this costume, I want that kind of candy, I want a new coat, I want a new sled, I want the biggest toy, I want a new TV . . . iPhone . . . Xbox . . . puppy . . . kitten . . . In the words of Buzz Lightyear, the list goes to “infinity and beyond.” It’s easy for even the most grateful of people to get caught up in the season.

Through the years I’ve discovered that this natural phenomenon is best battled by teaching the children how to be grateful. As parents, it’s a daunting undertaking, but as our kids grow from tiny ones whose wants are small and manageable to teens and young adults who have the potential to want enough that the cost could buy a small house, we soon discover the value in teaching our children how to rejoice always and give thanks in all circumstances.

November is one of the best times to help our children become children of gratitude instead of children of greed. Instead of asking what they want for Christmas, ask them what they are thankful for. Encourage them to dig deep as they count their blessings. Write their thanksgivings on paper and hang them on the refrigerator, and don’t forget to include your list of thanks to help them see that gratitude isn’t something that stops when you graduate from High School.

When your child is having a bad day, help them find the silver lining. Or, if there’s no silver lining, look at the goodness of God in spite of the bad day.

Perhaps you don’t have much. Begin to look at all that you do have, the love of your heavenly Father, faith to sustain you through the hard times, the gift of eternal life through Jesus Christ. And if you have an abundance, take time to show your children the blessing of not depending on material things. And no matter your economic status, this is a wonderful time of the year to go through the toy box and give away anything they haven’t played with in six months. Teaching them to be generous while they are grateful is a tremendous lesson.

When our children learn to rejoice over effort and accomplishment rather than rewards, we will have the assurance that they are on their way to a life of contentment. As they learn to give thanks, not for what they have, but for what Christ does in their lives no matter what they have or don’t have, we can take pride in knowing they’ll be able to be satisfied as they reach adulthood. And if along the way, those lessons become more deeply ingrained in our own thinking, the Praise God that we are never too old to be His children.

Moms can learn from those who've traveled this path before them.
Moms can learn from those who've traveled this path before them. | Source

I've been there before

Hebrews 5:2

“The Priest is able to deal gently with those who are ignorant and are going astray, since he himself is subject to weakness.”

Sometimes when I look at my children and my grandchildren, I remember my past, and I smile. I see things they’re doing and wish that I could give them some sort of sound advice that would help them avoid some of the mistakes I’ve made. Generally, though, I keep my mouth shut, because I remember how much wisdom I’d have accepted as I journeyed down that stretch of road. As Christians, Peter tells us we are priests. Every single person who has accepted Christ has entered a royal priesthood.

As moms, we are not only part of that royal priesthood, but we’ve been entrusted with little followers who we become “priest” to on the day they are born. Priests in Jesus’ time had a lot of responsibility. They not only taught the people what the word of God said, they also made the sacrifices and made rulings when there were disputes among God’s people. If it’s a priest who helps people understand the love, mercy and grace of God, then you are a “priest” to your child. If it’s a priest who explains what it means to fear and respect the Creator of the Universe, then every Christian mom must be a priest. If it’s a priest who hears the confessions and accepts the sacrifices, listens to the arguments and administers justice, then you are not merely a mom, you are a priest.

And Hebrews 5 reminds us that the greatest “priests,” like the greatest moms, remember that we are human, we are “subject to weakness” and sometimes we fall. Remembering that we aren’t perfect, always keeping in perspective the forgiveness that’s been extended to us through Jesus Christ helps us to “deal gently” with our children while not letting them off the hook.

There’s always the danger of extremes in everything we do. In parenting, to one extreme, there’s the danger of not enough discipline, raising a child who is a terror. But there’s also the other extreme, forgetting that we’re all human and God offers grace with every punishment and discipline. Today I invite you to consider yourself your child’s priest. Are you helping him know Christ a bit better every day? Does she know how much her Creator loves her? Will he understand that his misbehavior not only hurts you but dishonors God? Are you helping them become all they can be in Christ, dealing gently with them because you’ve been there?

Good News for Parenting Mistakes

Romans 8:28

And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.

This weekend I was at a worship conference. Ben Mandrell was the speaker. He talked about all the things we don’t do because of fear, but the thing that the Lord impressed upon me was when He reminded me about my favorite Bible verse, Romans 8:28. Ben mentioned it as a verse to help us as we walk through fearful times, but for some reason it struck me that this verse is also a promise to us moms!

If you’re like me, you make parenting mistakes more often than you’d like. It’s a bit better now that my children are all adults, but the entire time my girls were at home, I found myself doing or saying things that I later regretted. I love my girls desperately and did my very best, but the truth is I didn’t always get it right. I lost my temper more than I’d like and sometimes my best intentions weren’t necessarily the best thing for my kids. These words from Romans 8:28, words which have given me comfort and power a number of times before gave me a huge blessing this week.

As I thought about God working all things for good, I considered those mistakes I’d made in my parenting. What if God took even these mistakes and worked them for good as long as I truly love Him? What if all parenting mishaps committed while we love God with all of our heart are correctable, usable and even full of potential to become part of something God works together for good?

I certainly don’t want to ever use this as an excuse to not even try to be the kind of parent that makes God proud; however, this thought, that God has always been taking all of my unintentional mistakes and well-meant efforts molding them into something good, lightened my heart and gave me hope. I know that many of you are doing your best to live as Christ-like as possible, even as you raise your children. But I also know that just as many manage to beat yourself up at least one day a week or so because you wish you’d said something different, spent more time or offered more signs of your love.

Today I want to give you this reminder to encourage you. Always remember that God is working all things together for good for those who love Him, all of our mess ups, all of our mistakes and all of our regrets, even those we make as a parent.

We all want our children to praise God often!
We all want our children to praise God often! | Source

To Raise a Child Like Jesus

Philippians 2:5-8

7 . . . being made in human likeness.8 And being found in appearance as a man, . . .

I had the privilege of sitting in with our youth this week. We were talking about “walking the walk” even with our family. At some point during the discussion turned to ways that we make Jesus look bad or embarrass Jesus. One of the girls mentioned that sometimes she’ll break out in dance in public, and it embarrasses her brother. So, she thought maybe it embarrassed Jesus too. This gave me an opportunity to share with them my own view of Jesus.

You see, I’m the oldest in my family. I’m a girl who always kind of wished she’d had an older brother. So as I got to know Jesus, I became intrigued with the thought that He IS my older brother. Jesus is that person who will stick up for me when the bullies come around and watch out for me when I'm outside of my comfort zone. I am tremendously grateful that Jesus was “made in human likeness” and “found in appearance as a man” because it’s that picture of Jesus that gives me my “big brother” image.

But it’s also that verse that reminds me that Jesus was a kid once too. He had at least six younger siblings, and while we read about Jesus being tempted in the wilderness, I’ll bet the temptations He experienced as being the oldest of seven children were what really prepared Him for those forty days in the desert.

The youth laughed as I shared my picture of Jesus as a child. I explained that they’ll never read my description in the Bible, it was just my idea. I see Jesus as a fun loving and gracious kid. I imagine my Savior as being in “human likeness” when he was 12 and 13 perhaps even more so than when he was 32. And I can’t help but wonder if at least one time when He was young, Jesus put a frog in His sister’s bed.

Now before you think I am sacrilegious, I truly believe that Jesus never sinned. I believe that He was perfect so that He could make the sacrifice for our sins. However, unless your parents (or your Heavenly Father) have told you not to, is putting a frog in your sister’s bed, or any ornery sort of fun, a sin? I just don’t think it is.

Alright, so perhaps Jesus never put a frog in anyone’s bed, but you get the point.

Sometimes we want our Christian children to be so perfect, so Christ-like, that we convince them, sometimes unknowingly, that breaking out in dance in public is a sin. And while I want the children in every Christian family to be a little more well-behaved than the average 21st Century child, I would rather see them smile more and have more fun. Jesus didn’t come to make more rules. The Ten Commandments had already proven that there’s no way rules can get us closer to God. Jesus came to teach us how to live life together. He showed us how to forgive the unforgivable and party when the world says we should be somber (Luke 7). He demonstrated respect and love for all persons, but He also attended dinners that even by today’s standards wouldn’t have been places Christians should be seen. As Christian parents, sometimes I hope we’ll raise our children to show love and respect to everyone, to always put others needs before their own and to show Christ in all their actions. But I’m also hoping we won’t get too legalistic and suck all the fun out of life. I’m praying that as Christian parents when our kids bust a move in public we’ll join them, and we won’t get too bent out of shape if we find an occasional frog in the bed.

The Beauty of Sabbath

Isaiah 58:13-14

. . . if you call the Sabbath a delight . . . 14 then you will find your joy in the Lord, and I will cause you . . . to feast on the inheritance of your father Jacob.”

Last Monday was one of the most productive days of my life! I got my homework done, worked on some music, scrubbed the bathroom, did laundry, changed sheets and more! My house looked great and I felt really wonderful about myself. As I was putting the sheets on the bed, I wondered, “Why can’t I be this productive more often?” And just that quickly I recalled my Sunday afternoon.

A few years ago I decided to make a real effort to observe the Sabbath. Some Sundays I do a great job, and others I find myself not feeling very “rested” or “holy.” But this past Sunday, I rested! I spent time with my husband and simply allowed my body to rest and rejuvenate. As soon as I realized how blessed my Monday had been, I was reminded of how I had actually taken a Sabbath the day before! It immediately made me want to share my experience with other busy women; most especially moms.

It’s so easy for us, as moms, to get caught up in everything that needs done and not take time to just enjoy the day, bask in the love of our Creator and allow our bodies to have down time. Many times, even if we start to enjoy the day, we’ll quickly get caught up in that “one little thing that just has to be done for Monday.” And once we get started, it’s sometimes difficult for us to stop.

On top of that, we have these smaller versions of ourselves who need help with homework or want us to do what they want to do. We may even find ourselves at sporting events, competitions or training or even missing Sunday morning worship to get our child where he or she needs to be. Something that I’ve learned over the years, something God reinforced this past Monday, is the beauty of my life when I honor the Sabbath. Our need for rest is in our master design. In order to function the way the manufacture intended, we need a good night’s sleep every night and a Sabbath rest at least once a week. And when we follow the owner’s manual and carry out the Creator’s instructions, not only can we find ourselves more productive, we also are promised joy!God says He wants us to find our joy in Him by celebrating a Sabbath. He promised that we’ll get to ride in triumph. All of that for honoring the Lord’s Holy Day.

Now some of you are wondering, “What are the things I should and shouldn’t I do on the Sabbath?” That’s because, like the Pharisees, we like things spelled out for us. Just like young children, we really like knowing what the boundaries are. The problem with kind of thinking is that all of us end up breaking those “rules” if we bind ourselves up in them. The only directives we’re given are that no one is to do any work and we should keep the day holy. Keeping the day holy is a bit ambiguous an order when we really stop and think about it. Holy means to be like God, sacred. That doesn’t mean we won’t play games or have fun, but it does mean that we’ll be keeping in mind the things that God wants us to do rather than “doing as we please.” Having a holy Sabbath will usually mean worshipping with the body of Christ. We should be carrying to God the prayers and praises of His people. We should be rejoicing with those who rejoice and mourning with those who mourn. Keeping the Sabbath Holy is more about paying attention to and acting according to what God wants instead of our own.

Doing no work seems pretty straight forward, but even this phrase was widely abused by the Pharisees. They were constantly making people feel guilty about how far they walked and what they prepared to eat on this holy day. I really don’t think God is concerned about what we consider work and what we don’t. I have a friend who loves to ride the lawn mower. While taking care of the lawn would seem like labor to me, it’s a time of praise and worship for others. We don’t need to create a list of do’s and don’ts. If we simply ask our Sovereign Lord what He’d like us to do, we’ll get it right every time.

So, I’m really writing today to give you permission to take a Sabbath. Honor the day by doing what God pleases. Perhaps He’s giving you time to play with your children or enjoy your husband. Maybe your Heavenly Father knows that you just need a chance to rest and relax. Read a book, take a nap or play a game, whatever you decide, just get God’s approval first. He loves you and only wants the best for you. Walk with Him especially on the Sabbath and get ready to “ride in triumph on the heights of the land and feast on your inheritance.”

I love hearing from you!

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    • Lynne-Modranski profile image
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      Lynne Modranski 2 years ago from Ohio

      @Favored - :-) Of course you can peek in!!! Thanks so much for stopping by!

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      Fay Favored 2 years ago from USA

      I'm sure you don't mind me peeking in on this even though I'm not a mom :) I like your explanation of honoring the Sabbath. It's something that I believe isn't taught correctly and people become judgmental over those who follow it differently than they might.

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      Charla Pitre 2 years ago from Saint Martinville, Louisiana

      Very inspiring. As a dedicated Christian wife and mother, this helps.