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Fish & Chips - Olde England Fisheries

Updated on November 2, 2015

Fish Fish Beautiful Fish!

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Traditional British Food - Fish & Chips: Olde England Fisheries in Wakefield, UK

Eating Fish and Chips, Twice wi' Scraps

Ooh, fish and chips! Sometimes there’s nothing else that will quite hit the spot like cod ‘n’ chips wrapped up in newspaper! But there’s a world of difference – as any aficionado knows – between excellent, mediocre and frankly poor fish and chips. All the difference in the world!

Traditional Fast Food Restaurants In Wakefield, UK

So, if you’re looking for really top-grade fish and chips in West Yorkshire, where do you go for them? One option is Olde England Fisheries on Westmoreland Street in Wakefield, near the old market site. I met up with a friend there for lunch recently, and believe me that battered haddock was well worth the price of admission!


Eat On The Cheap: Bargains & Meal Deals Eating Out In Wakefield

Old Englande do a grand takeaway cod ‘n’ chips, but on this day we went for the sit-down experience, and settled ourselves in a booth in the spacious dining area. The waitress took our order for the two-meal-deal – knocking two or three quid off the price of haddock, chips, bread and a cuppa for two. (They also offer an even better pensioner’s deal which is a real bargain – can’t wait for retirement myself!)

Traditional British Cuisine In Wakefield UK

Having dined there previously, I went for the tea rather than the coffee as I had found the coffee to be standard 70s café/diner dishwater. (I.e. what coffee used to taste like before we Brits found out what it was supposed to taste like.) My companion went for it and insisted it was fine, but maybe that’s just how she likes her coffee! I had an individual pot of tea instead, with nice fresh milk in a jug, and it was a good cuppa.

The meal itself? We had haddock – I’ve never liked cod, tasty but dry – and it was yummy! The batter was light and crisp, the fish chunky and fresh, and the fact I was starving hungry added a certain extra savour to the dish. Mmm-mmm! As with my previous visit, the chips were fairly good and quite tasty, though not the best I’ve ever had. Certainly perfectly adequate chip-shop chips, though. The buttered brown bread was also very tasty, and any condiments desired were provided in small sachets. Portions were of a fully adequate size (and in these recessionary times, shrinking restaurant fare and grocery items seem to be the norm.)

Was it worth it? At around thirteen quid for two, for a nice relaxed traditional Brit dish in clean pleasant surroundings with civil, friendly serving staff, well worth it, I would say. Of course a meal is always pleasanter with a window seat on a nice sunny day, which we had: you can’t rely on that every time, though! It’s a shame however that the old Wakefield market, formerly nearby, is now gone. Along with every other street in Wakefield, it seems that every attractive building and feature of interest is being either knocked down or allowed to rot (especially the charming old Unity Hall), while modern buildings of unbelievable and repellent ugliness, such as the new market, are thrown up with ever increasing speed. (I’m sorry, I believe I turned into Prince Charles for a moment there. It’s true, though.)

And is there any justification for the indulgence of a plate of fish and chips on an occasional basis, nutritionally? Well, certainly it's a fairly high-fat meal - and that fat isn't likely to be of the Omega-3 rich kind that comes from fatty fish, not if using haddock, skate or cod. Previous governmental advice, however, while advocating, for example, a couple of fish-based meals a week, has conceded that only one of those might be of the oil-rich fish varieties such as herring or sardines. White fish still counts!1

Certainly Olde England offer both an excellent meal and a very handy central location in WF1 for shoppers. I would personally describe them as one of the best chippies in Wakefield. Are they the best? Perhaps: but I have my doubts. They certainly have strong competition in The Wetherby Whaler – but of course, the latter is significantly less convenient for shopper access. At any rate, you can’t go far wrong with the meal deal at Old England Fisheries in Wakefield, UK. Go order yourself a haddock and chips with all the trimmings tomorrow: you know you want to!


References.

1. CHS Ruxton. The benefits of fish consumption. Nutrition Bulletin. 36(1), pp 6–19, March 2011.





Go fish!

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