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Beef Treat borrowed from Vietnamese Pho

Updated on January 27, 2013

I got just a little wet on this Pho hunt in Ho Chi Minh City

Sometimes it just starts raining and just keeps on raining, sooner or later you get caught in it.
Sometimes it just starts raining and just keeps on raining, sooner or later you get caught in it. | Source

show me the beef

I have been lucky enough to be blessed with the opportunity to fully immerse into the cuisine of Vietnam, now made nearly famous by the Pho houses. A strange thing about the menus and recipes is the notion that they cannot be altered. It is more likely to hear “that pho is not the way it is supposed to be” than “that is an interesting style of pho”. Well I am a southwestern US boy that grew up with a fantastic German American Mother who could cook anything – her style that is. So the same as she adapted Chile Rellenos, I take liberty with some Pho technique. For another time I will speak of the adaptation of Mexican Menudo by applying some Pho standards.

Where I am from it is so dry we always celebrate the rain with soup and popcorn

So the Pho soup is to be served near boiling hot. Now doubt a culturally mandated concept to assure sterilization, but it does create a special dining experience. Of course we all await the lawyer who sues because his Pho was “too hot”. Pho Thai on the side, refers to a boiling hot bowl of soup with thinly cut beef on a dish raw on the side. The diner then takes her chopsticks and one by one adds the beef to the bowl. It can remain in or be taken out and eaten separately. I prefer to first squeeze lime all over the beef and let set for a few minutes, and then just dip it in the soup and cook the desired amount.

But at home I put a new twist on it. I do not make a soup, just a strong broth. Any broth will do. I prefer onions, beef bouillon, and butter in the mix, of course some garlic salt and oregano seems like a good idea. Then I take my beef and just cook it by dipping it into by boiling hot broth.

When getting the beef or slicing it yourself I heartily recommend a thickness just up from shaving.

East meets west is cool

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    • ConstantineNguyen profile image

      ConstantineNguyen 4 years ago from California, United States

      Hahaha :) It's nice that you like pho. I'm a Vietnamese and I hope you would have chance to try more cuisines of ours !!

    • Ericdierker profile image
      Author

      Eric Dierker 4 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Thank you for your comment. My wife is a wonderful Vietnamese Cook. She is from the "town" known as Cu Chi. Perhaps another time I can write about that particular area cuisine.

    • ConstantineNguyen profile image

      ConstantineNguyen 4 years ago from California, United States

      Oh nice! That'd be wonderful! I'm looking forward for your new hubs! Have a good day, sir!

    • vespawoolf profile image

      vespawoolf 4 years ago from Peru, South America

      I agree with adapting cuisine according to our preferences and available ingredients. I think thinly sliced beef would make the most tender pho. Voted up!

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