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Bread Bowl from a Bun

Updated on February 13, 2014
Marilynn Dawson profile image

Born-again Christian single mother of two grown kids. PC Tech, and Author of 18+ books in the non-fiction, personal/spiritual growth genres

Inspiration for Bread-bun Soup Bowls

Bread has been used throughout history in a wide variety of ways to eat food. From flat breads used for dipping in sauces and rolling up one's favourite filling, to being pulled apart and served with stews, to being turned into sandwiches in more modern times, bread has been busy!

The bread bowl entered the scene in the middle ages from what little I've been able to dig up on the subject. Typically a bread bowl uses an entire small loaf of bread to make a fairly sizeable soup bowl that can be eaten when the soup is gone.

The concept for a bread-bun soup bowl came to me as a quick way to feed a small crew of people on a budget.

Ingredients and sharp knife
Ingredients and sharp knife

Cooking Time if doing one bun

Prep time: 5 min
Cook time: 15 min
Ready in: 20 min
Yields: 1 bread-bun soup bowl.

Ingredients

  • Olive Oil
  • Dinner Bun, larger kind, up to kaiser-bun size

The 15min cooking time stays the same no matter how many buns you are doing. The 28 buns I did took the same length of time in the larger oven as this one did.

Instructions in Pictures

Carefully shave off top of bun with sharp knife
Carefully shave off top of bun with sharp knife
Carefully cut around circumference of shaved area, don't go all the way to the bottom!
Carefully cut around circumference of shaved area, don't go all the way to the bottom!
Using clean fingers, pull out bread plug from center of bun.  It will roughly tear out according to depth of knife's cut.
Using clean fingers, pull out bread plug from center of bun. It will roughly tear out according to depth of knife's cut.
The bun hollowed out and it's bread plug off to the side.  We are now ready to seal it.
The bun hollowed out and it's bread plug off to the side. We are now ready to seal it.
Pour a little olive oil into a small dish.  You'll use more than you expect.
Pour a little olive oil into a small dish. You'll use more than you expect.
dip your fingers and thumb into the olive oil, don't shake off any excess, you'll need as much as your fingers can hold.
dip your fingers and thumb into the olive oil, don't shake off any excess, you'll need as much as your fingers can hold.
Liberally apply olive oil to all inside areas of the bun!  Don't leave any area left dry.
Liberally apply olive oil to all inside areas of the bun! Don't leave any area left dry.
The bun's insides covered in olive oil.
The bun's insides covered in olive oil.
For good measure, I like to lightly spread olive oil around the outside of the bun as well.
For good measure, I like to lightly spread olive oil around the outside of the bun as well.
Turn oven to 350F and place bun in oven for at least 15 min or until bun is golden and crispy
Turn oven to 350F and place bun in oven for at least 15 min or until bun is golden and crispy
The finished bread bowl awaiting a thick brothed, cream-based, or cheese soup.
The finished bread bowl awaiting a thick brothed, cream-based, or cheese soup.

Bread-bun bowl quiz


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Instructions in Text

  1. 1) Take a sharp knife, I used a steak knife. Place the bun on it's flat bottom on your work surface and look at the top of the bun. You want to leave as much bun available as possible while obtaining the widest interior possible. So take the knife and begin slicing across the top of the bun, from the outermost edge you hope to ring your bowl, to the farthest edge you are after. Instructions I've located that talk about large bread bowls encourage leaving at least 1.5″ available as side walls and base. However, because these are dinner buns here, the best we can hope for is maybe a half inch to 3/4″ around the outside.
  2. 2) Once you've cut off the top, take the sharp knife and insert it at the inner edge of the bun now, beside the exposed soft interior. Be careful you don't push the tip all the way to the bottom of the bun. Try to leave at least a half inch on the bottom to prevent leakage.
  3. 3) After you've cut all the way around the exposed softer bread, remove the knife and using clean fingers, pull out the "plug". You'll notice that the bread center will pull out at roughly the depth you had cut with your knife. Set the bread plug aside for use in dipping.
  4. 4) Pour some olive oil into a small to medum sized bowl, and liberally apply it to the interior of your bread bun soup bowl. I tried to use a basting brush for this and ended up using my fingers. I also lightly slathered some on the outside of the bun to seal it externally as well.
  5. 5) Place buns on cookie sheet and place in 350F oven for at least 15 minutes or until the bun turns golden. For my oven, that turned into 25 minutes.

Final notes

The bun comes out very crispy inside and out. This allows for one or two servings of thin-broth soup, or 2 to 4 or more servings of cream or thick-broth soups. When the diner begins to notice the bun going soft, it's time to eat the bun and grab another if they want more soup. The bread bun cores are great dippers to dip in your soup and enjoy, or to serve in other ways. Some people have chopped up the cores into cubes, spiced and then dried them for croutons. Others have cubed them for dipping in sauces.

Needless to say, these little bowls were an all-out hit for the setup crew! My grown kids like them too.

My crew loved this! Do you?

Cast your vote for Bread-bun Bowls

© 2014 Marilynn Dawson

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