ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Cherries, Are They Good For You? Vitamins, Minerals, Antioxidants and Delicious Fruit

Updated on November 26, 2016

Sweet Cherries!

Creative  Commons licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Creative Commons licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ | Source

Ooh, doesn’t everyone love cherries? Maybe it’s just something about the (very) short cherry season that makes us yearn after something we can’t have (or at least not very often, anyway, or at great expense). But honestly, they’re just so delicious! The fruit belongs to the Prunus genus, like the plum and the peach, and the tree produces absolutely gorgeous clouds of blossom that the Japanese are just crazy about.

It's not hard to think off the top of your head of a dozen different delicious culinary uses for the cherry: cherry pie (hello Twin peaks!), cherry jam, cherry turnovers, preserved cherries in a sundae... I'm hungry just thinking about it!

But what, exactly, do cherries have to offer us on a nutritional and health basis? Of course, as every governmental body seems to tell us on a near-daily basis, we all need our five a day... ten a day... whatever, depending on what government is currently nannying you into submission. We get the general picture, we all need a whole lot of fruit and vegetables! And cherries are surely a delicious, refreshing way to help to accomplish that end goal. It's no hardship to snack down on them! And to appreciate the contribution fruits in general can make to our health and well-being.

(Maybe it's not always easy to get your five a day consumed, each and every day. But cherries sure make it easier!)

Cheap Cheerful Cherry Products On Amazon!

But what, exactly, do cherries have to offer us on a nutritional and health basis? Of course, as every governmental body seems to tell us on a near-daily basis, we all need our five a day... ten a day... whatever, depending on what government is currently nannying you into submission. We get the general picture, we all need a whole lot of fruit and vegetables! And cherries are surely a delicious, refreshing way to help to accomplish that end goal. It's no hardship to snack down on them! And to appreciate the contribution fruits in general can make to our health and well-being.

But what about cherries specifically? In a nutritional sense, raw sweet cherries have a satisfactory fat content of zero grams per one hundred and thirty-eight gram portion, for those of us seeking to lose weight due to obesity or even a slight weight problem. The fiber content may also be potentially helpful at three grams per 138 gram serving (twelve per cent of daily value), if you're looking to up the fiber content of your diet or have problems with regularity. (One of the sugars in cherries, fructose, is also reported as having a laxative effect in some individuals).[4] In terms of vitamins and minerals, raw sweet cherries are a valuable source of Vitamin C, as well as containing calcium, iron and Vitamin A precursors. They may also be useful for their low saturated fat and salt content.[5]

How about other phytonutrients that cherries might be notable for? One study looking at the antioxidant content of sour cherries found flavonoids called cyanidin derivatives to be the main factor of their antioxidant content, sturdily resisting food processing to maintain their activity within commercially sold products.[1] And judging by the eyecream ads, those antioxidants are good stuff!

Certainly cherries can be an expensive treat, especially out of season. (Tip: search them out in your local market, not in tiny overpriced packs in the supermarket). But with so much to offer, isn't it worth searching some out for yourself – maybe even today?

References.

[1] Kirakosyan, A. Seymoura, E.M., Urcuyo Llanesa, D.E., Kaufmana, P.B., Bollinga, S.F. 'Chemical profile and antioxidant capacities of tart cherry products'. Food Chemistry. 115;1: 1 July 2009, pp. 20-25

[2] Liebreich, K., Wagner, J., Wendland, A. 'The Family Kitchen Garden'. London: Frances Lincoln Ltd.;2009, p. 170

[3] Fabčiča, J., Štampara, F., Usenik, V. 'Sugars, organic acids, phenolic composition and antioxidant activity of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.)'. Food Chemistry. 107:1; 1 March 2008, pp. 185-192

[4] Grodner, M., Long, S., DeYoung, S. 'Foundations and clinical applications of nutrition: a nursing approach'. Mosby; 2000, p. 91

[5] Nutritiondata. 'Sweet cherries, raw'. Nutritiondata website. 2009. Available at <http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1867/2>. Accessed on 18/10/2010.

Cherry Ripe, Cherry Ripe

How do you eat cherries?

See results

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)