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Cooking in Crock Pot vs Stove-Oven vs Dutch Oven

Updated on February 9, 2014

A pretty ceramic crock pot for $5!

Got excited with this good find and I like the old model look of it.
Got excited with this good find and I like the old model look of it. | Source
My first attempt to making Beef cuts using my new treasured crock pot (above). I was a bit nervous and didn't trust the slow cooker. I was also hesitant just to keep it on low temp since my dinner preparation to use the crock pot was planned late.
My first attempt to making Beef cuts using my new treasured crock pot (above). I was a bit nervous and didn't trust the slow cooker. I was also hesitant just to keep it on low temp since my dinner preparation to use the crock pot was planned late. | Source
Corn cobs for the pot.
Corn cobs for the pot. | Source
Beef, Red Squash, Spinach in Coconut & Ginger cooked from the crock pot.
Beef, Red Squash, Spinach in Coconut & Ginger cooked from the crock pot. | Source
Beef, Red Squash & Spinach in Coconut & Ginger
Beef, Red Squash & Spinach in Coconut & Ginger | Source

I found this vintage-looking crock pot from a thrift store for $5! I was happy of my find though I admit when carrying my crock pot home, I was bothered with questions. How does a crock pot work? Does it really save a lot of energy, heat and cooking time? What can I cook with it aside from stews?

As its popularity is growing, would you consider a Crock Pot an essential cookware?

I have asked for few opinions to better understand its usage.

My aunt, Eva Fernandez says: "I really do not consider using your crock pot for genuine cooking but I don't care. It is very, very convenient for me and it doesn't make pisik-pisik (splatters). You can just turn it on overnight and the meat becomes well tenderized. It doesn't burn your cooking because it doesn't suck up all the liquid! But this will depend on what your putahi (dish) is."


My aunt, Quinia Mendez says: "I'm really not into cooking. The fact is that let me do the other housework, not just cooking. But when I was working before, I was first to get home and I was forced to cook. I got a crock pot and I only use it to a minimum. I only use it to cook stew and keep my 'dinuguan' pork blood stew warm. I seldom use the oven 'coz I don't cook special dishes. My recipes are so simple & all the time I use my best friends- 'kaldero' cooking pot & 'kaha' skillet."

Crock pots or slow cookers many say are the most convenient way to prepare "hot" meals. It doesn't need much food preparation, thus labour is cut-down. Everything is just thrown inside the cooker, set in low temperature and you go ahead minding your business away from the kitchen inside long hours.

My friend Lindy Lopez says: "Being used to having a house helper prepare family meals three times a day in my younger days back in the province, I am just too lazy to cook for my own. I go out for take-outs or order-in pizzas and calamari a lot. I got a crock pot as a gift from my sister with a note that said- "Dear Linds, may this at least cook the meals for you. Love, Sis"


My friend Cris Nanola says: "Your crock pot questions makes me crack. Lol!
Yes, I used to love my crockpot. Well, at least the first few months of purchasing it. I had a sleek black and stainless steel one-beautiful and functional. I use it maybe 2-3 times a week for stewing beef mostly. I like the idea of “plug it and forget it” for the crockpot, so I could do other stuff. I could even go grocery shopping while the food is cooking without anyone watching it and come back hours later to a ready meal. I also like one of its features that keeps the food warm for a long time even after switching it off and I can even take my crockpot elsewhere without microwaving the food again. Perfect for potluck get-together. However, it is also time consuming, the fact that it is slow cooking unlike the traditional or regular stove cooking. Boring, lol! I personally, prefer the stove cooking because I enjoy watching my meal in the process of cooking. I also find it satisfying to watch and take care of my cooking than simply tossing it in the crockpot. Wait, did I answer your question? Yes, I find it convenient. Again, depending on what you're cooking? I use it for stew and soup. Do I own a Dutch oven? Yes, but not the traditional cast iron. Mine is a regular casserole I use frequently."

Some people claim that they have no time to do cooking and hate to think what to have for dinner. It wouldn't serve as the most popular gadget in the kitchen for the one who holds the knife.

My cousin Marni says: "I quiver to the sight of grease in foods. Cooking in a crock pot is avoiding the usage of cooking oil as much as possible. Any excess oil from meat, I get rid of it."

My cousin Amy Fernandez says: "I don't have a crock pot. It consumes too much electricity. It's not in-style. I heard that it is really yummy to stew in a clay pot."


A crock pot for many, is still one of the electric kitchen equipments to consider since we go back to the days that a crock pot could save us during several hectic times in our daily home and work routines.

My cousin Michelle Otto says: "Mom has one. Mom used to use it once in a while. Now she doesn't anymore. When she is busy, you put the ingredients and start the cooking the night before until the next day. Crock pot is easy. All you have to do is add ingredients. No sautéing. Cooking, you have to stay in the kitchen and baby it. Crock pot: When you came back from work, the food is cooked and ready to eat. (I don't use a crock pot, but have been tempted to.) I like stove ovens, because I'm more of a baker rather than on the stove-top- cooker. On the stove top, it's too much baby sitting, though faster. My version of "cooking" is anything over 6 minutes of babysitting or if it involves a lot of chopping. With using the oven, you mix ingredients or shove in meat, peeping in to test doneness or flipping it over. This way, I can do laundry or other errands at the same time. Stew is my mom's fave use. What's a Dutch oven?!? LOL (Show's how much cooking I do!) My mom says that she doesn't use it. Iron cast Kaldero: once and a blue moon. When she makes Kare Kare."

≈♥≈


Make cleaning your range & oven fun.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
I was having fun pullingout the stove components, the oven rack apart, and brushing and seasoning my cast iron pans while the music of Barry Manilow kept me going for 4 hours scrubbing!Grime and dirt beneath the surface cover.Stove coils individually removed for light brushing.Drip pans soaking in hot water, soap mixed with degreaser to make scrubbing easier.Greasy door and inside of oven. Racks have to be brushed separately. I tried as much scraping and scrubbing as I can and as much sticky grime I could removed.Two sheets of tin foil spread at bottom of oven to conveniently trash away from spills.Putting on the aluminum burner liners to sit on each drip pan.Heat element coils put back in place.Thank you Barry Manilow for keeping me company!
I was having fun pullingout the stove components, the oven rack apart, and brushing and seasoning my cast iron pans while the music of Barry Manilow kept me going for 4 hours scrubbing!
I was having fun pullingout the stove components, the oven rack apart, and brushing and seasoning my cast iron pans while the music of Barry Manilow kept me going for 4 hours scrubbing! | Source
Grime and dirt beneath the surface cover.
Grime and dirt beneath the surface cover. | Source
Stove coils individually removed for light brushing.
Stove coils individually removed for light brushing. | Source
Drip pans soaking in hot water, soap mixed with degreaser to make scrubbing easier.
Drip pans soaking in hot water, soap mixed with degreaser to make scrubbing easier. | Source
Greasy door and inside of oven. Racks have to be brushed separately. I tried as much scraping and scrubbing as I can and as much sticky grime I could removed.
Greasy door and inside of oven. Racks have to be brushed separately. I tried as much scraping and scrubbing as I can and as much sticky grime I could removed. | Source
Two sheets of tin foil spread at bottom of oven to conveniently trash away from spills.
Two sheets of tin foil spread at bottom of oven to conveniently trash away from spills. | Source
Putting on the aluminum burner liners to sit on each drip pan.
Putting on the aluminum burner liners to sit on each drip pan. | Source
Heat element coils put back in place.
Heat element coils put back in place. | Source
Thank you Barry Manilow for keeping me company!
Thank you Barry Manilow for keeping me company! | Source

Why is a Range Stove/Oven a major appliance in every household?

While there are many microwaves, convection ovens and coffee makers available, is there still a need for the stove & oven? Is it becoming a less essential unit in your kitchen?

So some household don't have the need for the chunky stove that takes up a square space in the kitchen. They can do as much as a stove could offer into the portable and multi-functional microwave and a toaster-oven. But do you really want to give up your stove? I guess not. First, it carries a wider space for quantity and quality cooking. Trays side by side, roasting side by side, baking side by side, it is just all so convenient. Second, it is our most usual way of cooking. There is no need of firewood, therefore, we help save our trees.

Many love to cook but hate cleaning. So what now? Cleaning always ends up with one person mostly catching up with the mess in the kitchen, *sigh*. Giving maintenance to the appearance of your household stove and oven is not a task that you would find justifiable. There are no excuses if you want your stove/oven to function well and prevent the maturation of fowl smells building up from grease and old food burns. A thoroughly well-maintained stove especially the oven, makes cooking glorious. ≈♥≈


Dutch oven "kaldero"; dirty kitchen "abuhan"

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba Thank you for taking this pic for this hub. "Left-over burnt firewood"Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba "Charcoal"Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba "Dutch oven" (kaldero)Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba "Iron-cast Dutch oven" (kaldero)Photo Credit: Thank you my sis, Missy Torralba in taking this pic for the hub. "What's cooking?"
Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba Thank you for taking this pic for this hub. "Left-over burnt firewood"
Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba Thank you for taking this pic for this hub. "Left-over burnt firewood" | Source
Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba "Charcoal"
Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba "Charcoal" | Source
Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba "Dutch oven" (kaldero)
Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba "Dutch oven" (kaldero) | Source
Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba "Iron-cast Dutch oven" (kaldero)
Photo Credit: my sister Missy Torralba "Iron-cast Dutch oven" (kaldero) | Source
Photo Credit: Thank you my sis, Missy Torralba in taking this pic for the hub. "What's cooking?"
Photo Credit: Thank you my sis, Missy Torralba in taking this pic for the hub. "What's cooking?" | Source

The cherished life of a Dutch Oven

"Kaldero" or Dutch oven is what many households in the Philippines use for cooking. I had no idea that the name "Dutch Oven" is how it is called originally. It is simply identified as a "pot" or "cooking pot". Again, I don't own one here abroad, so I had asked a favour from my sister to take pictures.

In the Philippines, people are more conscious on electricity usage. Gas range is still popular and the traditional "abuhan" ashed surfaced/dirty kitchen. At the abuhan or on the ground, the iron pot either sits on top of three large stones laid across each other, on an iron grid or a pot stand made from clay using scrap/driftwood and "uling" charcoal. There is also the availability of portable super saver electronic stoves.

This old-time cooking pot (cooking vessel sounds more so historic) does make food cooking valuable. I mean valuable in its time, energy and taste. Aside from the pot's durability, heat spreads evenly keeping any cooked food hot for longer periods. Thus, making it an exceptionally unique cooking pot to be around for a very long time. ≈♥≈


History of Slow Cooking and Pottery

The Stone-Aged Civilization - after returning from a skillful hunting, the make-shift fire was the slow-method of cooking which included wild-root plants.

5000 BC - China begun with pottery

3000 BC - pottery developed in the Americas.

2000 BC to 500 AD - the ancient method of slow cooking was commonly out in the open space and in the homes of prominent families. Cooking pots were made from a mass of molten metal (cast iron), stone or hard clay. This heavy mass of cookware started during the ancient Greek and Roman periods, then adapted by different cultures in Egypt, Africa and Asia. It was a vessel to boil and slowly cook whole fowls from hunting such as ducks, peasants, quails, wild chicken and pigeons, as well as the tough meat of turtles, rabbits, goats, lamb, boars and other farming of domesticated animals that involved long hours of cooking time. Roasting on a spit was also a popular method of preparing food. Slow cooking included a variety of nutritious root vegetables for soups and other plants like corn, barley, rice and wheat. Fish was abundant but more preferred dried, salted or smoked; a specialty dish for the nobles (whilst these days, we enjoy stewed or poached fish in our pots).

Cauldrons and other iron cooking vessels - Its purpose was not limited to food but oversize pots were also used to boiling water for hot baths. From its gigantic sized cauldrons to the most transportable sized pots handy during war times (medieval, civil wars, western cowboys), these pots were hung through large hooks strong enough to hold them steady over wood-burning fires or used indoors on burning embers. Many of these iron cast pots we see in medieval movies.

Over-sized cauldrons were also used to immerse humans in high boiling water against their eternal faith in God, those who were accused of witchcraft and as an execution against a crime as one of those capital punishments by death. The western, in the years after, started using tin pots as a lighter alternative. In witchcraft and paganism, cauldrons became an distinct symbol in fairy tales/children stories, legends and folk traditions. These pots appear as cooking vessels in slow brewing of potions for witches' spells and the wise women pagans' extracting effective herbs as healing magic.

1600's Cast iron Dutch ovens began when the Dutch reproduced and enhanced them. An Englishman named Abraham Darby traveled to Holland to adapt the knowledge of the hot pot process and brought this conception back to England. He called this iron cast pot the Dutch Oven.

17th century - Blacksmiths' skills were also applied in making iron cooking vessels. Europe and Asia had more supply of cookware in brass and copper (aside from earthen cooking pots of wood and clay).

19th and 20th centuries - Crock Pot was one of the cherished cookware made of glazed porcelain. Stainless steel and aluminum also made progress. It became famous in extended hours of cooking hard or dried beans, soups and stews.

1960s - West Bend in Wisconsin was the first to formalize a cooking pot for beans; the "Bean Pot" it was called. Then came next, Naxon Utilities Corporation in Chicago, Illinois. Naxon developed the Naxon Beanery All-Purpose Cooker.

1970 - The Rival Company took over Naxon and reconstructed the Naxon "beanery" cooker re-introducing the following year (1971) the name Rival Crock-Pot. ≈♥≈


Differences & similarities cooking at low temperature

CROCK POT
STOVE/OVEN
DUTCH OVEN
Crock pot can be left unattended for long hours.
Pot in stove needs to be guarded for it could run out of liquid.
Not to be left unattended.
Uses less heat and more energy efficient without loosing a lot of air.
Oven heats a larger area; more heat consumption. Stove top in low temp setting (200-250 degrees) would be similar to a crock pot.
Normally is made of cast iron and heats up fast.
Crock pots have tighter lids to seal in moisture. Tenderizes meat.
Cooking uncovered is possible in low heat. Brown meat over stove to seal the juices.
Has a snug-fitting lid. The pot over fire enhances taste. Even cooks well with rice.
Keeps a favourite cooked dish warmed up especially for a party.
Heats up quick and convenient in warming up food in trays or casseroles at a party gathering.
Safe and great for outdoor camping. Stacking Dutch ovens with legs- hot delicious meals all at once.
Slow cooking, longer time.
Slow simmer on stove, less time (a same recipe comparison).
Dutch ovens cook in a quarter less hours (at 325 degrees) than a crock pot.
A kitchen aid to your tight schedules.
Exhibits expressive cooking and baking.
Indoor and outdoor compatible.
"Kaldero" by Jun See @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/lifeisshortdrinkfast/ Thank you Jun for the usage of this photo!
"Kaldero" by Jun See @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/lifeisshortdrinkfast/ Thank you Jun for the usage of this photo! | Source

What's Your Cooking Life-style?

No time in your hands? Too lazy to cook? Convenience over fun in the kitchen? Creative or simple cooking?

See results

Slow-cooked Beef with Mushrooms

First attempt on slow cooking using a ceramic crock pot.
First attempt on slow cooking using a ceramic crock pot. | Source

Outdoor Cooking - a wonderful and delicious treat.

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    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 5 years ago

      Such an interesting hub post. We use our crock pot lots around here. The results are a quick, hot, tasty meal at the end of a busy day. Your history of the crock pot and table information are a great bit of info to share.

    • coffeegginmyrice profile image
      Author

      Marites Mabugat-Simbajon 5 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

      Hello teaches12345! Thanks for finding this hub interesting. I am starting to get convinced that a crock pot is useful for busy people. Saves a lot of time during a busy day. I already made two meals from it and they were delicious! Have a good day!

    • CrisSp profile image

      CrisSp 5 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

      What a read this Sunday afternoon! Now thinking, should I take out the crock pot again? It's been stored in the garage for quite some time now and in fact, in the line up for selling this summer garage sale. But then again, I'm okay eating the airplane food, so why bother. Lol! Kidding aside, this is another great hub. As usual, your photos are great! Voted up!

    • coffeegginmyrice profile image
      Author

      Marites Mabugat-Simbajon 5 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

      Hi Cris! A crock pot food is way better tasting and fuller than your in-flight food, lol! (But I want some of your airplane treats.) Save the crock pot and leave it cooking with something delicious for the hungry hubby when you're off to fly. Just make sure he comes home to turn it off. Cheers!

    • profile image

      missy 5 years ago

      It's dutch oven (kaldero) for us here in the Philippines...unless you're filthy rich and can afford to pay sky-rocketing electricity bills (Lol). It's true that if you use dutch ovens, your food tastes good and has that smoky smell from using firewood or charcoals. Bonus points if your hands gets covered with black soot from the pots...hehe.

    • coffeegginmyrice profile image
      Author

      Marites Mabugat-Simbajon 5 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

      Hi Missy! I really appreciate your visit to this hub. Your comment means a lot to me and our readers. Indeed, the "Kalderos" are more economical and the black soot that gets onto our hands, I remember using this soot to mask our faces during the Sinulog Feast. Maybe not you, but I had tried it. My, I don't think that that was even right, smudging my face with it . But I remember to have had fun with the soot. :)

    • alocsin profile image

      alocsin 5 years ago from Orange County, CA

      I'm quite a fan of crockpot cooking because of its convenience. But I like oven cooking too because it's relatively fast. Have never used a dutch oven though. Voting this Up and Interesting.

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 4 years ago from Arizona

      Lots of good information here about cooking and crockpots. Mostly I don't use them because I am home a lot..When I was working I loved coming home to the wonderful scents. It felt like someone came over and made dinner. Great HUB

    • coffeegginmyrice profile image
      Author

      Marites Mabugat-Simbajon 4 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

      It is very welcoming to come home to the wonderful scents of cooking, indeed! Thank you carol7777!

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 4 years ago from America

      I love my crock pot and use it often. That was a good buy on the crock pot it is pretty. It's the kind I use for my husband and I. I would love to find one that looks like that. I will have to keep an eye out for one. Voted uP!

    • coffeegginmyrice profile image
      Author

      Marites Mabugat-Simbajon 4 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

      There were a few second hand smaller crock pots I saw recently...cute, vintage print design and the small size was just perfect for 5 people in the household. Half size of the one I have on the hub. One had a Japanese design on it, so cute! I was almost tempted to purchase one of those, still for the same $5 price at a thrift store, but what am I going to do with 2 crock pots at home, lol.

      Hope you will find one, one day, moonlake. For me, I really like the ceramic look than the newer versions, as long as it is functional and brings out good cooking, I'm good. *smile* Enjoy your next meal with all your heart. Love, coffee

    • erorantes profile image

      Ana Maria Orantes 3 years ago from Miami Florida

      Hello miss marites. I like the way you present your article. The fact that you talk about your subject with other people is excellent. I like the history of the crock pot. The food look appetizing. I like your pictures. Your hub is good. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

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