ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Five Benefits of Flaxseeds

Updated on November 11, 2014
Flaxseeds come from the flowering flax plant (Linum usitatissimum)
Flaxseeds come from the flowering flax plant (Linum usitatissimum) | Source

Flaxseeds come from the flowering flax plant (Linum usitatissimum) which is native to the Mediterranean area and east to India.

Flaxseeds have many benefits including:

  • Cholesterol management
  • Blood sugar control
  • Increased immunity
  • Reduced inflammation
  • Cancer Prevention

Flaxseeds are rich in fiber which aids in the management of cholesterol levels
Flaxseeds are rich in fiber which aids in the management of cholesterol levels | Source

Flaxseeds Allows for Cholesterol Management and Increased Fiber Intake

Flaxseeds are rich in fiber which aids in the management of cholesterol levels by raising the good cholesterol levels and lowering the bad cholesterol levels. Because it is so rich in fiber, flaxseeds can sometimes act as a laxative in some individuals. In recent years, studies have demonstrated that flaxseeds may even be a suitable treatment for constipation and irritable bowel syndrome. However, other studies advise individuals to proceed with caution in the use of flaxseeds if they have a history of esophageal stricture, ileus, gastrointestinal stricture, or bowel obstruction. In addition, those who also have a history of acute or chronic diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, diverticulitis, or inflammatory bowel disease may also want to avoid flaxseed consumption.

According to a study led led by Xu Lin of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai, Lin and colleagues examined results from 28 studies involving more than 1,500 men and women to try to further examine the overall impact that whole flaxseed and its derivatives have on cholesterol levels. The average whole flaxseed or flaxseed oil intake was about one tablespoon per day. The findings demonstrated a link between whole flaxseed and reductions in total cholesterol and LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol also known as bad cholesterol.

Flaxseeds Aid in Blood Sugar Control

One way to improve blood sugar levels in people who suffer from diabetes is to incorporate flaxseeds into their diet. Due to the level of Omega-3 fatty acids, flaxseeds help to also decrease the risk of development of diabetes.

Flaxseed contain Omega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids which protect the body from bacteria and viruses.
Flaxseed contain Omega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids which protect the body from bacteria and viruses. | Source

Flaxseed may Increase Immunity

Flaxseeds are rich in Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. They have the ability to protect the body from bacteria and viruses, may enhance your system's immunity.

Flaxseeds Reduce Inflammation

For those who suffer from chronic inflammation whether due to an illness or conditions like asthma or diabetes, flaxseeds possess properties that reduce inflammation. In ancient Greece, physicians used flaxseeds as a treatment for inflammation.

Other Benefits of Flaxseeds

Other benefits of flaxseeds include cardiac benefits. In addition to omega-3 fatty acids, flaxseed products also contain chemicals known as lignans. What is the role of lignans? Lignans are believed to have antioxidant properties and may also act as phytoestrogens, very weak forms of estrogen found in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans. These phytoestrogens enable flaxseeds to play an important role in cancer prevention and treatment. In fact, studies have shown that women who consume large amounts of lignans appear to have lower rates of breast cancer.

Ground flaxseeds can be added to fruit smoothies or sprinkled on hot or cold cereals.
Ground flaxseeds can be added to fruit smoothies or sprinkled on hot or cold cereals. | Source

How to Eat Flaxseeds

How are flaxseeds consumed? It is recommended that you grind flaxseeds due to the difficulty in digesting them. Once ground, they can be sprinkled on hot or cold cereal, added to fruit smoothies and yogurt or baked items such as bread, muffins, or cookies to produce a nut-like flavor.


© 2014 Mahogany Speaks

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)