ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Flesh Eating Worm for Dinner?

Updated on May 27, 2015

Something new for dinner

Being the mother of two children I am always looking for ways to feed them nutritious meals that are also appealing. Making them fun is a bonus. My children are seven years apart, Boy is the oldest and is adventurous. Girl, my baby, not so much. Chicken fingers and mac and cheese were her go to foods. I had spent endless hours and large amounts of money buying magazines and cookbooks searching for recipes that will appeal to her. One night when Husband was away I decided to try one of my finds, Flesh Eating Worm. Sounds disgusting right? It looks disgusting. But that’s what I was shooting for, I wanted shock factor. A well rounded meal with basically four ingredients and an un cooked spaghetti noodle that was guaranteed to make dinner time fun.

Simple ingredients

Directions

I started with a one pound pork roast. I went for the unseasoned variety because of Girl, but there are some excellent pre-seasoned roasts available that would have work well. I placed the roast on some tin foil and wrapped it with some thick sliced bacon, overlapping to ensure complete coverage when it cooked and shrank up a little. Again, the bacon is entirely up to you, in my book there is no such thing as a bad bacon choice. If you feel it’s necessary you can use some tooth picks to hold the bacon in place but if you tuck the bacon under the roast it should hold well enough. Use the foil to wrap the wrapped roast, but not to tightly. Then pop that sucker in the freezer. This is going to be crucial in the cooking process. The bacon will cook faster than the roast. You don’t want a burnt worm on your table. Freezing for an hour will freeze the bacon a little to slow down the cook time while allowing the roast to cook through.

When your worm is slightly frozen, a little hard to the touch but not solid, place it on your baking dish and unwrap it. You could put it on the grill but do not leave it wrapped, that will steam your bacon and we don’t want that. I used the foil instead of plastic wrap for my roast for several reasons, it works well on the grill, but it also makes clean up a snap if you are cooking in the oven. I cooked mine in the oven at 350 degrees for just under an hour. While it cooked I made my sides, Mashed Potato “Pus” and Green Pea “Eggs”. My kids don’t really like peas but I love them and Broccoli eggs just were not going to work.

Wrapped up worm

Finishing up

With the sides under my belt and the roast finished cooking I prepared to “decorate” my worm. Study your worm, choose which end makes the best head, usually there is one side that is slightly larger, that’s the one I opted for. Using a sharp knife, not serrated, and cut a “V” shaped mouth. This also gives you the opportunity to make sure your worm is cooked through and if so to sample your creation. I’ll give you a second. Yumm right? Take your spaghetti noodle and break off a small piece, do not break the pieces off in advanced, the tiny pieces are hard to pick up and you need to get a feel for how large your “teeth” need to be. Randomly place the teeth along the edge of the mouth until you have a nice toothsome grin. How many teeth are up to you. I also recommend working from the inside out, it can get pretty tight in there. For effect I used a caper for an eyeball.

The finishing touches

With the sides under my belt and the roast finished cooking I prepared to “decorate” my worm. Study your worm, choose which end makes the best head, usually there is one side that is slightly larger, that’s the one I opted for. Using a sharp knife, not serrated, and cut a “V” shaped mouth. This also gives you the opportunity to make sure your worm is cooked through and if so to sample your creation. I’ll give you a second. Yumm right? Take your spaghetti noodle and break off a small piece, do not break the pieces off in advanced, the tiny pieces are hard to pick up and you need to get a feel for how large your “teeth” need to be. Randomly place the teeth along the edge of the mouth until you have a nice toothsome grin. How many teeth are up to you. I also recommend working from the inside out, it can get pretty tight in there. For effect I used a caper for an eyeball.

Creating a smile

The reveal

I put the mashed potatoes on my serving plate and spread then out smoothly and placed my worm on top. Then I gutted her and artfully placed the pea eggs in and around the slash. If you don’t want to use peas then some chili makes awesome “guts”. My masterpiece was ready to serve and my kids were seated and ready for dinner. I placed the platter on the table with a flourish “ta da” and announced in true chef style “What I have prepared for you tonight is a female flesh eating worm served on a bed of pus! Please enjoy!”. I was prepared for shock, even awe, but revulsion was not what I expected. I looked at them and then at the dinner I had prepared for them and realized I may have gone overboard, just a little bit. Thinking if I served it up quickly it wouldn’t look so gross. So I sliced it up, asked Boy if he wanted head or tail (he chose tail and later admitted to me that the head was just too gross) and spirited the offending head away from the table. Girl on the other hand was having none of it, she cried, she yelled, she threw “eggs” at us and she refused to eat. But while she was tossing pieces of her dinner across the table at us Boy and I were digging in. The words delicious and awesome passed his lips between bites, he even asked for seconds!

I may have crossed a line with my worm (at least in Girl’s book) but I did make a wonderful dinner that resulted in another dinner time tale that has been retold for years. I didn’t give up on my quest for kid friendly meals, I just toned it down a bit. I’ll tell you about those later.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)