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How to Make an Omelette

Updated on June 12, 2018

French Style Omelette

Mine is even a little overcooked on the outside. Those light brown patches should be even more bright yellow!
Mine is even a little overcooked on the outside. Those light brown patches should be even more bright yellow!

How to Cook Eggs

Fresh vegetables should be thrown in last. They remain crunchy, fresh, and still get warm!
Fresh vegetables should be thrown in last. They remain crunchy, fresh, and still get warm!

What Makes a French Omelette

Typically in America, we eat our omelets with a mixture of ingredients cooked into them. The eggs are cooked fully through and can be kind of dry. French omelets are slightly undercooked and moist. They rarely receive that golden brown color that American omelets have and remain a bright yellow color with a smooth consistency. They're also cooked with a lot of butter... like a lot. Also, the ingredients are all added just before you roll it up, and not before. It's buttery, smooth, moist, fresh, and aesthetically beautiful. While some people prefer the American version because they are intimidated by the idea of undercooked eggs, these are perfectly safe to eat!

Ingredients for an Omelette

Ingredients

  • 3 Large Eggs
  • 2 Tablespoons Butter
  • 1 Clove Garlic, Crushed
  • 1 Half Jalapeno Pepper, Seeded and Diced
  • 1 Fresno Chili Pepper, Seeded and Diced
  • 4-5 Basil Leaves, Cut for Garnish
  • 1 Cup Shredded Cheese
  • Salt and Pepper To Taste

Scrambling Eggs

Always use freshly ground black pepper. In any recipe ever. Don't use preground stuff. It's awful.
Always use freshly ground black pepper. In any recipe ever. Don't use preground stuff. It's awful.

How to Whisk Eggs

To start, let me state that all of the above ingredients are optional except for the eggs and butter. Many people claim that you need to experience your first French omelet in its purest form. I personally love my omelets filled up with delicious ingredients though so I went all out! So as the saying goes, you can't make an omelet without cracking a few eggs. Put your eggs into a small bowl with some salt and pepper and a few drops of cold water. Beat the eggs vigorously until all clear/whites are gone. The eggs should be runny and drain right off of your whisk or fork when you are finished. This should take a few minutes.

Do You Add Milk for Scrambled Eggs?

What Gos Best With Scrambled Eggs?

Prep Your Fillers

Now, these steps are entirely optional if you plan on eating it as just the eggs, but what kind of barbarian eats an omelet without a little meat or vegetables in it?! You can fill an omelet with anything obviously, but some great pairings are sausage, bacon, and ham from a meat standpoint. Vegetables that work great are onions, garlic, hot or mild peppers, green onion, chives, parsley, and cherry tomatoes. I threw a bit of freshly chopped basil on top and it added a great kick of flavor. If you use peppers make sure you devein and seed the peppers beforehand. Some people say you should use gloves, which is probably true, but I like to get a little kick as I lick my fingers clean through the process. Besides, you're not scared! This is a French omelet for God's sake! It's not for cowards! Garlic is also a great choice for gloves if you go that route. It's incredibly sticky when it's fresh. Once you've prepped all of your ingredients mix them together well in a bowl and set them aside for later. They'll be added to the omelet just before it finishes cooking.

Knife Skills

How to Chiffonade

A chiffonade is a fancy way of saying "cutting ribbons of herbs". It's really simple, but it looks fantastic! Simply take the leaves you're using, in my case it was basil, and roll them from bottom to top very tightly. When it's in a little cigar type roll take your knife and cut the roll down the way. When you unroll it you'll have tons of herb ribbons that are great for mixing or garnishing. It's really easy, but you can use the word chiffonade and make yourself look really fancy!

Fresh Basil Ribbons!!!

Do You Cook Eggs With Butter or Oil?

How do You Make Fluffy Eggs?

Time to start cooking! Set your skillet on medium heat and throw in two tablespoons of butter. Melt it down so that the butter is melted, but not browning. Once the butter is ready, pour your whisked eggs into the skillet and begin to pull the eggs inward so nothing sticks to the sides. Shake the pan occasionally to ensure the eggs don't stick to the pan. Make sure you use a nonstick pan for this!!! Continue this process until the tops of the eggs are wet, but not runny. This is going to give us the delicious creamy texture that is specific to French omelets.

Omelette Ideas? Share in the Comments

It will start to cook immediately so be sure to keep it moving! Pull those sides in and the butter will begin to incorporate into the egg mixture and add that great buttery flavor!
It will start to cook immediately so be sure to keep it moving! Pull those sides in and the butter will begin to incorporate into the egg mixture and add that great buttery flavor!

How to Make Creamy Eggs

When your eggs reach this point, where they're wet but there's no pooling of egg mixture anywhere, you should cut the heat.
When your eggs reach this point, where they're wet but there's no pooling of egg mixture anywhere, you should cut the heat.

Omelette Filling Ideas

How to Close an Omelette

When the eggs are the consistency shown in the picture above, where they're wet but not runny in spaces, use your spatula to level out the top of the omelet and turn off the heat. Take your toppings and distribute them, leaving about an inch or two on one side so the omelet will roll well without losing any of the fillers. Take your spatula and slowly flip over one edge. Tip the edge of the pan in the direction of your roll and use the tilt with the spatula to continue the roll. Once you have it entirely rolled, flip the omelet onto your plate with the crease facing down. Let the plate cool for a minute and dig in!!!

How to Roll an Omelette

Finished Product

Final Thoughts

My French omelet came out a bit overcooked, thus the browned exterior instead of a bright yellow. This can be avoided by keeping the heat monitored more closely, instead of trying to do your dishes as it cooks like I did. Regardless, these eggs were still creamy and moist, just how the French like it. The veggies inside were fresh and the eggs were buttery and light. It was the second greatest omelet I've ever had, the best being a French omelet I made perfectly once before in my life. Serve this with a side of bacon or other breakfast meats and start your day off the right way!

Which way is better?

What style of omelet do you prefer to eat?

See results

How was it?!

5 stars from 1 rating of French Omelet

Questions, Comments, or Criticisms?

Let me know in the comments below what you think this would pair well with, or any praise or criticism of the dish! I look forward to reading and responding to any questions as well! Also, please be sure to keep an eye out for any new recipes I post or pair with this dish! And as always, keep eating good!

© 2017 Jesse Unk

Comments

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    • JesseUnk profile imageAUTHOR

      Jesse Unk 

      16 months ago from Ohio

      Haha I like both, but it really was super creamy and delicious. I liked the French way a lot.

    • Cre8tor profile image

      Dan Robbins 

      16 months ago from Ohio

      I like the more moist omelet too and crisp veggies. I consider myself a good omelet chef but I do end up more on the American side of the finish than the French usually. (Probably because I like to do the dishes as I go too. :-)

    • Fullerman5000 profile image

      Ryan Fuller 

      16 months ago from Louisiana, USA

      I found that cooking bacon in the oven is one of the best ways. Also a more healthier way as well. But I love bacon just about any way so, as long as its crispy, I am happy.

    • JesseUnk profile imageAUTHOR

      Jesse Unk 

      16 months ago from Ohio

      Thanks Ryan! I'll actually be posting a bacon test soon for which method cooked the best! And the key to this is not breaking it up. Shake it around, pull in gently, but the butter will solidify it really well and make it easy to control! Good luck! Let me know how it goes!

    • Fullerman5000 profile image

      Ryan Fuller 

      16 months ago from Louisiana, USA

      I love omelets, but I am not good at making them. I always seem to end up with large scrambled eggs. I will have to give this a shot. And that bacon in the picture looks very delicious as well. Thank you for sharing this recipe.

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