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Healthy Italian street pizza

Updated on April 5, 2015

Healthy Italian street pizza

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Healthy Italian street pizza

Prep time: 24 hours 20 min
Cook time: 25 min
Ready in: 24 hours 45 min
Yields: 10 pieces

Healthy Sicilian street pizza

This recipe takes me back to my years as a young girl watching and assisting as my grandfather made his tasty, traditional New Years' Eve dinner. I will cherish those memories my entire life!
This recipe takes me back to my years as a young girl watching and assisting as my grandfather made his tasty, traditional New Years' Eve dinner. I will cherish those memories my entire life! | Source
Gathering the ingredients.
Gathering the ingredients. | Source
Checking to make sure my water is around 90 to 100 degrees.
Checking to make sure my water is around 90 to 100 degrees. | Source
I tossed the yeast into the water. This is called "benchproofing the yeast", to make sure it's still viable.
I tossed the yeast into the water. This is called "benchproofing the yeast", to make sure it's still viable. | Source
I am measuring and mixing all the dry ingredients into my stand mixer. You can make this dough by hand too, but I am using the stand mixer because the dough has such a high water content and that makes it pretty difficult to handle.
I am measuring and mixing all the dry ingredients into my stand mixer. You can make this dough by hand too, but I am using the stand mixer because the dough has such a high water content and that makes it pretty difficult to handle. | Source
I am going to use the dough hook to mix all the dry ingredients together.
I am going to use the dough hook to mix all the dry ingredients together. | Source
Once the ingredients are combined I start adding my yeasty water.
Once the ingredients are combined I start adding my yeasty water. | Source
Slowly add the yeasty water while the dough hook is slowly mixing. That's a 2 or 3 on my stand mixer.
Slowly add the yeasty water while the dough hook is slowly mixing. That's a 2 or 3 on my stand mixer. | Source
I mixed the dough on a little higher setting, a setting of 4 or 5 for about eight minutes. The dough will be very wet, that's good.
I mixed the dough on a little higher setting, a setting of 4 or 5 for about eight minutes. The dough will be very wet, that's good. | Source
Pour your dough into a very large and well-oiled bowl. You oil the bowl so the dough can rise easily and not stick to the sides.
Pour your dough into a very large and well-oiled bowl. You oil the bowl so the dough can rise easily and not stick to the sides. | Source
After spending the evening in a cool area in my basement, the "fermentation room", the dough has risen very nicely. You want to bring the dough into your warm kitchen about 3 hours before you are going to use it.
After spending the evening in a cool area in my basement, the "fermentation room", the dough has risen very nicely. You want to bring the dough into your warm kitchen about 3 hours before you are going to use it. | Source
Gathering the ingredients for the sauce.
Gathering the ingredients for the sauce. | Source
Mince and sauté your garlic in a large enough saucepan to accommodate the pureed whole tomatoes.
Mince and sauté your garlic in a large enough saucepan to accommodate the pureed whole tomatoes. | Source
Puree the whole canned tomatoes, sugar, and salt.
Puree the whole canned tomatoes, sugar, and salt. | Source
While the garlic is sauting, add the sun-dried tomato tapinade, basil and oregano.
While the garlic is sauting, add the sun-dried tomato tapinade, basil and oregano. | Source
Saute for a few minutes and stir well. It will take on a very deep tomato fragrance. That is when you will want to add the pureed tomato mixture.
Saute for a few minutes and stir well. It will take on a very deep tomato fragrance. That is when you will want to add the pureed tomato mixture. | Source
You can let the sauce simmer on very low while you get the dough ready.
You can let the sauce simmer on very low while you get the dough ready. | Source
Before I get my hands full of dough and oil, I am going to grate my cheeses and set them aside. You can also grate the cheese just before you add it to the pizza.
Before I get my hands full of dough and oil, I am going to grate my cheeses and set them aside. You can also grate the cheese just before you add it to the pizza. | Source
You are going to want to oil the pan well, with 2-3 tablespoons of oil. It keeps the wet dough from sticking and it crisps up the bottom of the pizza nicely.
You are going to want to oil the pan well, with 2-3 tablespoons of oil. It keeps the wet dough from sticking and it crisps up the bottom of the pizza nicely. | Source
Spread the oil around with a wadded up piece of waxed paper the best you can.
Spread the oil around with a wadded up piece of waxed paper the best you can. | Source
The dough may fight going in all corners and will want to return to center. Keep working it. If you have just an inch left, walk away from the dough for about 5 minutes and start again. It will probably reach all the edges now.
The dough may fight going in all corners and will want to return to center. Keep working it. If you have just an inch left, walk away from the dough for about 5 minutes and start again. It will probably reach all the edges now. | Source
As promised, the 5 minute rest for the dough did the trick!
As promised, the 5 minute rest for the dough did the trick! | Source
Let the dough rise for about an hour as the oven heats up.
Let the dough rise for about an hour as the oven heats up. | Source
I am going to let the dough rise on top of my warming stove.
I am going to let the dough rise on top of my warming stove. | Source
The dough has risen and it's time for that homemade sauce.
The dough has risen and it's time for that homemade sauce. | Source
I am so anxious to see if I have captured all the flavors of my grandfather's pizza!
I am so anxious to see if I have captured all the flavors of my grandfather's pizza! | Source
Fresh out of the oven. If only you could smell this. It smells just like Grandpa's!
Fresh out of the oven. If only you could smell this. It smells just like Grandpa's! | Source
You will want to let the pizza cool for at least of few minutes.
You will want to let the pizza cool for at least of few minutes. | Source
This pizza is so amazing! It's everything I hoped for! I just want to sit and devour the whole pan but I guess I should eat some salad too!
This pizza is so amazing! It's everything I hoped for! I just want to sit and devour the whole pan but I guess I should eat some salad too! | Source

Healthy Italian street pizza

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour, organic
  • 1/4 cup vital wheat gluten, organic
  • 2 cups semolina flour, organic
  • 2 teaspoons malted milk powder, if vegan, just use sugar
  • 2 tablespoons King Arthurs Harvest grains, you can sub chia, flax seeds, or oatmeal
  • 1 2/3 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, extra virgin
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • sauce: 1 can whole peeled tomatoes, drained, 28 ounces
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup sun-dried tomato tapinade, or tomato paste
  • 5 cloves garlic-minced
  • for toppings I used:
  • 8 ounces asiago, grated
  • 8 ounces whole milk mozzarella, I put the cheese in the freezer about 1/2 before I shred it and that makes the job so much easier.
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano

Healthy Italian street pizza

  1. I used a stand mixer with my dough hook for this recipe, but you could, of course, just grab a big mixing bowl and do the mixing and kneading yourself. Warm your water in a measuring cup and add the yeast. Set aside while you measure out your flours.
  2. Add the flours, vital wheat gluten, harvest grains (if you are using them) and salt to the mixing bowl. Now give it a quick but thorough stir with a fork or wooden spoon. Then place the bowl back onto the mixer. Turn the mixer on slow and start to add the water and yeast mixture along with the olive oil.
  3. I then let the mixer mix the dough with the bread hook for about 8 minutes. The dough will be very wet and somewhat sticky. You will need to oil completely a very large bowl into which you then add the wet dough. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it sit either in a very cool room or your refrigerator for at least 24 hours, or, up to 72 hours.
  4. You can make the sauce now or while you are letting the dough rise on your baking sheet after it has completed the cold fermentation.
  5. Take and empty the whole peeled tomatoes into the food processor along with the sugar, salt, garlic and sundried tomato tapinade. Place in a saucepan and let it simmer for about 25 minutes on low. Let it cool after that and set it aside.
  6. Three hours before baking, bring your dough into a warm kitchen and let it come to room temperature. One and half to two hours before you are to bake the pizza, you are going to spread it out in the pan you plan to bake it in for the second rise.
  7. I used a jelly roll tray with a few tablespoons of olive oil spread on the bottom. I then dropped all the dough onto the tray and used my fingertips to press the dough all the way to the edges of the pan. If the dough fights you on those few last inches, walk away from it and let it rest for about 5 to 10 minutes. When you come back to finish, the dough should allow you to get to the edge of the pan now.
  8. Let the dough sit covered in warm area for about 1 to 2 hours until in almost doubles in size.
  9. Once the dough has risen nicely, gently put a few big ladle fulls of sauce on the dough and then the cheese or cheeses. Sprinkle with oregano. Heat the oven to 450 degrees and place the pizza in the oven for 20-25 minutes turning the pizza 180 degrees halfway through the baking process. Try to let the pizza cool for about 3-5 minutes before serving it with your favorite salad.

Italian street pizza alla Dominic

I grew up in an ethnic Italian neighborhood in Cleveland where you could just walk up to an open window at a local pizzaria and buy pizza by the slice. As a family tradition, my grandfather made his own pizza every New Year's Eve for me, my brother, and my grandmother. He would also sauté up huge pieces of Italian sausage that he would place on his own pizza slice, roll it up, and wash it down with a nice shot of bourbon! These are my first memories of celebrating New Years Eve and have yet to eat something better on that night! I have since visited Italy several times, often eating their local street pizza, but have never endeavored to make my own. The nutrition-focused side of my brain would take over and ruin my white flour and cheese memory. But what if I could still make it, only more delicious and nutritious? I am happy to report that on my first try sans the sausage, I nailed the memory. I hope you love it as much as my family does!

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