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Healthy whole wheat rolls with onion and herbs

Updated on October 27, 2013

Healthy whole wheat rolls with onion and herbs

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Healthy whole wheat rolls with onion and herbs

Gathering the ingredients for making the rolls.
Gathering the ingredients for making the rolls. | Source
I have the dough "hook" on for this recipe.
I have the dough "hook" on for this recipe. | Source
Whole wheat dough can be dense to work with but the stand mixer does a great job doing all the kneading.
Whole wheat dough can be dense to work with but the stand mixer does a great job doing all the kneading. | Source
The dough looks ready for its rising time!
The dough looks ready for its rising time! | Source
Take the dough out of the mixer and shape it into a round smooth shape.
Take the dough out of the mixer and shape it into a round smooth shape. | Source
Make sure you oil the sides of the bowl so the dough can rise unhindered.
Make sure you oil the sides of the bowl so the dough can rise unhindered. | Source
It's been a few hours and the dough is ready to be shaped and rise again.
It's been a few hours and the dough is ready to be shaped and rise again. | Source
Lightly flour your non-stick surface or counter. Separate the dough into 14 pieces.
Lightly flour your non-stick surface or counter. Separate the dough into 14 pieces. | Source
I start my oven about now to heat up the kitchen and to get the oven to a saturated heat. It also helps in the second rising of the dough.
I start my oven about now to heat up the kitchen and to get the oven to a saturated heat. It also helps in the second rising of the dough. | Source
It oven time!
It oven time! | Source
Whole wheat and heavy whole grains won't be a big fluffy roll.
Whole wheat and heavy whole grains won't be a big fluffy roll. | Source
These rolls will have a wonderful flavor with a nice texture.
These rolls will have a wonderful flavor with a nice texture. | Source
These rolls taste great with any meal but they really taste great as little sandwiches! Let your imagination run wild!
These rolls taste great with any meal but they really taste great as little sandwiches! Let your imagination run wild! | Source

Healthy whole wheat rolls with onion and herbs

Prep time: 2 hours 30 min
Cook time: 24 min
Ready in: 2 hours 54 min
Yields: Makes 18 rolls

Healthy whole wheat rolls with onion and herbs

  • 3 cups whole wheat flour, whole wheat white works too!
  • 3 tablespoons vital wheat gluten
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sweetleaf sugar, or regular sugar
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons rapid rise yeast
  • 3 tablespoons dried toasted onion, plain dried onion works great too!
  • 1 tablespoon of either basil, oregano or thyme, or a combo of those.
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons potato flour, or coconut flour
  • 1 cup lukewarm water, check your yeast directions for exact temperature

Whole wheat rolls with onion and herbs

  1. You can use your hands or a stand mixer with a bread hook attachment for this recipe. I prefer to use the stand mixer because working with whole wheat flour can be a hand mixing challenge.
  2. Measure out the flour by gently scooping the flour out of the bag with a large spoon and placing the flour in your measuring cup. You can weigh out one cup of flour too, which is the correct way to measure flour but you may not have a scale. Make sure you level off the flour with the measuring cup without packing it down. Add the salt, onion and herbs to the mixing bowl. Set the mixer on low and stir the ingredients together for about 30 seconds. For correct weight measurements see my text area of the recipe.
  3. Stop the mixer and add the lukewarm water. Turn the mixer back on and mix until all the ingredients come together. At this point the dough will be sticky. Place the dough in a high sided, well oiled bowl.
  4. Set the bowl in a warm place and allow it to double in size. You can place a piece of tape on the bowl marking where the dough is in height so you can gauge it's rise better. It may take as long as two hours and as little as an hour and half. See my cooking notes in the the text section of the recipe on how to create a perfect environment for your rising dough.
  5. Grease three, 6 inch round baking pans and set them aside.
  6. When the dough has doubled in size gently take the dough from the bowl and lay it out on a flour dusted surface. I use a sil-pat which works great and keeps the counter clean. Divide the dough into 14 same-sized balls or biscuit shapes and place them into the previously greased round baking pans. Cover the rolls and let them rise another hour, or hour and a half. About 40 minutes into the rising time turn your oven on to 350 degrees.
  7. When rolls are fluffier than when you started place them in the oven for 20-24 minutes until golden brown. I serve a few for dinner and then freeze the rest. The recipe doubles nicely too!

Whole wheat rolls with herbs and onions

I love to bake bread. It's got to be the most satisfying thing for me and my family. I try to bake all winter but when it gets too hot out, I am fortunate enough to have a grocer near me called Dorothy Lane Market. They make the best European- style whole grain breads you can get this side of the pond. I know what you are thinking, "why bother to make your own then?" The answer is simple-- I love to make homemade bread. I can make anything that suits my fancy! It really is simple-- you can do it to!

This recipe can serve as a basic whole wheat biscuit recipe for you and it will allow you to add any dried herb you think would be delicious with the meal you plan to serve. If you think making dinner AND rolls is just too much work for one day, just makes these rolls in advance and freeze until you need them. They thaw in about a half an hour and can be re-heated. Just wrap them in aluminum foil and pop them into a 350 degree oven for eight to nine minutes and serve hot!

Referring back to the recipe, if you weigh out your flour, one cup weighs about 4 1/2 ounces. This is the preferred method by professional bakers the world over. It has been found that if you just take your measuring cup and jam it into the bag, you can scoop out more than 5 ounces of flour. This will mess up the wet to dry ingredient ratio and can ruin the bread or, at the very least, create a brick!

To create a perfect little environment for your rising dough, take a large, clean cooler that will fit your bowl, and a 4 cup glass measuring cup. Fill the measuring cup with water, microwave or stove heat the 4 cups of water. Take the measuring cup full of hot water and place it and the prepared bread into the bowl using plastic wrap to cover the top in the cooler. Now let it rise. It works great and can speed up the rising process.

One last thought. I refer to a sil-pat in many of my recipes. If you are not a kitchen geek you may not know what I am talking about. A sil-pat is a silcone sheet that can be put on a cookie sheet and placed in the oven. It eliminates the need to butter or oil the pan and keeps your pans clean at the same time. I have 2 different sizes and use them for other tasks as described. I love kitchen tools that multi-task! Give these home warming biscuits a try!

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