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Help Yourself in the Checkout Line

Updated on January 8, 2017

At the Check Out Counter

By photo taken by flickr user Young in Panama (flickr) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By photo taken by flickr user Young in Panama (flickr) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Shopping Tips

Grocery Shopping Tips for the Wheelchair Bound

Tired Of Taking Too Long at the Grocery Store?

Are you tired of taking too long at the checkout counter of your grocery store? Do you hate it when you get home to find your eggs broken and your bread flattened out?

There is no reason why your grocery shopping trip should be a cause for anxiety. Follow these few simple steps and you can greatly improve your check shopping experience:

If you are planning to buy more than a few groceries, bring someone with you and push two carts. Lets face it, if you fill your cart to the brim without planning ahead, you will have absolutely no control over how it is packed back into the cart at the end of your shopping trip. If you can push two carts around the store, you can decide more easily which order groceries get put on the conveyor belt at the checkout stand.

Have your coupons ready. Also, you should check to make sure your money or your cards are with you before you fill the cart. Nothing is as annoying as filling a cart full of food, loading it on the belt, waiting for the cashier to check it out and then realizing that you can't pay because you left your money at home. Also, it helps if you have a way to separate the coupons you are going to use from the ones that you need to put away.

Look to the end of the checkout stand to see if it narrows. If the belt is wider than the place where the food will pass through the scanner, then filling it to its capacity can cause jam ups or force your food to fall to the floor as it tries to fit through the pass. Load your food so that it either is in line with the scanner pass through, or so that it has room to move around naturally.

Load heavy, bulky packages first. These can serve as a base for stacking other food in the cart in a way that will make it stable. It wil also fit better and have less chance for breakage if the heavy stuff is on the bottom.

Put things packed in glass either on the bottom or in the middle. If you put glass bottles on top of a loaded cart there is a very good chance that you will lose them before you get home. They will slide off and break, and if they do it after you have left the store, the store will not replace them for you.

Put your bread, cake and eggs in the cart last. These things are so fragile that the they need to be on top of the pile. Make sure the eggs are in a secure position, and make sure that nothing is on top of your bread.

Follow these tips regardless of whether you shop at a store that bags for you or makes you bag for yourself. These are all common sense tips that are often overlooked by shoppers, but if you follow them your grocery shopping trip will be greatly enhanced.

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Rainbow Grocery Cooperative

By Yusuke Kawasaki (http://www.flickr.com/photos/u-suke/6945393297/) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Yusuke Kawasaki (http://www.flickr.com/photos/u-suke/6945393297/) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

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    • profile image

      Victor 2 years ago

      Yes and no. I have a library card, and I boorrw books regularly. (You don't read about my bookmobile?) However, anyone running the bookmobile knows me and I'm in the computer, so the card lies pristine at the bottom of my book bag.So let me ask, do you *like* browsing through the library?

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 7 years ago from the short journey

      Good tips to keep in mind!

    • purpleveil profile image
      Author

      Vanessa Kristovich 7 years ago from Vineland,NJ

      Thanks for the comment.

      Yes, this is true. There are a lot of things that can affect the speed at which the checker is working. WIC orders take a lot of time because they have to be precise or the government will not reimburse the store. People with a lot of coupons can really slow a line down because the coupons need to be verified. And some of the smaller grocery stores only have one cashier with a couple of floor workers as back up, and tht can be exhausting. And occasionally you will het behind a customer that is so picky that they keep rearranging their cart while you are trying to check them out. So, yes, if there are lines to choose from you can help yourself a lot if you can identify which one is the faster miving one.

    • profile image

      Charles Miller 7 years ago

      Great information!

      I also find that taking a few seconds to watch how fast the grocery clerk is working can be a great indicator.

      If they're moving slowly, that line will move slowly.

      If they're moving quickly, chances are the line will as well.

    • purpleveil profile image
      Author

      Vanessa Kristovich 7 years ago from Vineland,NJ

      Do you have a harrowing experience at the grocery store check out line that you would like to share? Post your stories here. As an experienced shopper and an experienced cashier, I may have more advice to share that I didn't think to include in the main article.