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Hiker Food And Recipe Ideas For Eating In The Wilderness

Updated on June 14, 2016

Hikers Trail Mix

The trail mixes are a very crucial food item to pack along for a short hike, weekend hike, or long distance hikes. Due to hikers commonly burning off and depleting all of there calorie intake while hiking. A hiker needs foods to eat along the way and throughout the day while hiking. A variety of nuts will provide nutritious amounts of high protein into a hikers diet. On average a hiker might choose to pack pistachios, almonds, peanuts, walnuts, pecans, or cashews. These all are great choices to add to your bag of trail mix.The sesame and sunflower seeds are also great alternative choices. Other common hiker foods include chocolate chips, m&m's, mini-marshmellows, pretzels, oyster crackers, tiny chunks of dehydrated fruits, banana chips, and never forget the deliscious raisins. These are all ideal hiker choices of food for nuriousment while hiking though the backcountry of the wilderness.

Good Olé Raisins And Peanuts (GORP)

4.7 stars from 3 ratings of Hikers Trail Mix

Ginger Tea

Ginger Root Tea Benefits A Trail Hiker

The ginger root is loaded with many different healing properties and is a great choice of medicine for many of the hikers ailments. Naturally the ginger root contains many anti-inflammatory properties that are great remedies for treating severe muscle aches or stubborn joint pains. It absolutely helps a hiker to relieve all sore, tired, and aching lower body muscles. Commonly the ginger root is widely known to be the ideal cancer fighter, it improves blood circulation, aids in boosting the immune system, clears the sinuses, relieves common migraines, and is said to even heal frostbite. A hiker really has to be in tune and focused with there own personal health while living out in the wilderness for several weeks at a time.

Cook And Preparation Time For Ginger Tea

Prep time: 5 min
Cook time: 15 min
Ready in: 20 min
Yields: one eight ounce cup of ginger root tea

Only Two Ingredients For Ginger Tea

  • Four Slices Ginger Root, Finely Sliced
  • One Cup Water, Boling Hot

Only Two Easy Steps For Ginger Tea

  1. Slice the ginger root into three to five small one inch chunks. Place sliced ginger root into the bottom of a eight ounce cup.
  2. Pour the boiling hot water over the sliced ginger root until the eight ounce cup is full. Let the ginger tea steep and infuse for approximantly twelve to fifteen minutes. Enjoy Optional: Add one teaspoon of honey or lemon juice for extra flavor.

Dehydrated Meals

Ready-Made Entrees

The pre-packaged dehydrated foods are best for hikers to carry into the Wilderness due to there lightweight and extra long shelf-life. On the market today there are currently a wide variety of many different types of pre-packaged dehydrated foods that come with an oxygen absorber inside to retain the foods freshness. All a hiker has to do for dinner at the end of a long hiking day is to simply boil up some hot water with a mini campstove, then add the hot boiling water directly inside of the bag, and reclose the bag to let sit for fifteen to twenty minutes. At much higher elevations hikers will be forced to allow extra time for cooking each serving for dinner. Another popular option in the backcountry for only shorter hikes are the meal-ready-to-eat packets. They come packaged in tiny aluminium foil packets and are heated up by a little heat pouch. These aluminum foil packets are only for the short-term hikers. Any long distance hiker who averages upwards of one hundred miles each week of hiking never wishes to wear themselves down with all the extra weight on there very backs.

Hiker Staple (Peanut Butter)

Peanut Butter Roll-ups For Lunch

A simple jar of peanut butter is absolutely an excellent source of protein for hungry hikers. The rolled up flour tortilla wrap filled with high protein peanut butter are luxury items out on the hiking trail. Many hikers will prefer to eat there peanut butter at breakfast time by mixing and melting the peanut butter into there morning bowl of hot oatmeal. Just one simple spoonful of high protein peanut butter can go a very long way in satisfying a hikers hungry appetite while hiking out in wilderness. Typically peanut butter will contain seven grams of protein for each serving, high levels of vitamin E, with twenty percent niacin, and four grams of iron.

Dry Powder Milk

Cereal And Milk In The Wilderness

Milk In The Wilderness

Any hungry hiker would naturally find great delight in a nice glass of cold milk in the mornings for breakfast prior to heading out onto the hiking trail for a long day of hiking. Just one single package of instant nonfat dry powdered milk will make one quart of milk. The only two utensils required to mix the milk is a drinking cup and a stiring spoon. Simply pour the powder milk into a cup, then add approximately four cups of very cold water to the cup, and stir vigorously until blended well. A large cup of powdered milk for breakfast gives the hiker a boost of energy and is fortified with generous amounts of vitamin A and daily values of vitamin D. The powdered milk will also aid a trail hiker with adequate amounts of calcium that naturally helps to add extra bone strength to the legs. If a hiker was to happen to pick up some toasted oats cereal while in town at the grocery store. Then a simple small and single serving bowl of cereal in the morning could give you just the extra boost of energy that you have been longing for. Most toasted cereals are high in vitamin A, generous amounts of iron, good quantities of thiamin, excellent levels of vitamin B-twelve, great sources of niacin, zinc, and generally even folate. Whenever any hiker carries toasted cereal out into the backcountry the hiker must repackage all of the cereal into one serving plastic bags that zip closed to cut down on the food scents that will commonly attract any bear within a one mile radius of your current location. Always be certain to properly discard of all cereal boxes and all other food item types of trash in the proper place while in town for a resupply.

Basic Rice

A Little Rice Can Save The Day

A basic bag of white rice or even any typical type of noodles can be a real lifesaver whenever that is all the food that a hiker has left to eat in there food sack before arriving to a town with a grocery store to resupply. Often times the extra carbohydrates contained in pasta and noodles will help a hiker feel full for much longer periods of time. The different types of instant gravy packets are excellent to flavor up the white rice to make it more edible and to taste much better to a hungry hiker. Some hikers will claim that the eating of white rice just doesn't ever seem to satisfy there overwhelming hunger while out in the backcountry. Although, any hungry hiker will never be to bothered by eating regular white rice or a bag of noodles out in the wilderness whenever there seems to be a complete lack of available grocery stores anywhere.

Alternatives To Pasta In The Wilderness

There are many different simple alternatives and basic bread recipes a hungry hiker can cook easily over a moderate flame in a single serving heated skillet while out in the backcountry. Often times hikers will use the trail lingo and call the cooked fry bread "Indian Bread." In fact, the native American Indians did often cook fry bread over an open campfire. Some simple ingredients like the white flour, yellow cornmeal, falafel mix, or steel cut oats can be widely used in the cooking of indian bread. All a hiker needs to do is simply stir in enough filtered water, extra virgin olive oil, and white flour to create a soft dough-like substance. Over a compact cook stove with a moderate flame burning, fry in a heated one serving skillet, and often turning the dough to prevent any burning. Many hikers will commonly prefer to dip there cooked fry bread into white granulated sugar,ground cinnamon,fresh maple syrup, or maybe even raw honey. Others like there fry bread served simply plain with any type of jelly spread over the top of the bread. Regardless of a hikers personal preference the fry bread is a very fuel intensive and is strongly considered a rocket fuel food along the Appalachian Trail. The total calorie intake from just one serving of indian fry bread is roughly one-thousand whopping calories. It's loaded with many carbohydrates at one hundred grams, fifty nine grams of fat, and sixteen grams of highly important protein.

Voting For The Best Source Of Protein

what is your favorite nut to mix into your hiker trail mixes?

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A Short Video Clip Displaying A Hikers Average Daily Food Intake

Comments Are Always Welcome Here

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    • BryanChaseGentry profile image
      Author

      Chase Gentry 18 months ago from Nashville, Tennessee

      I have hiked the Appalachian Trail during the summer, autumn, fall, and even in the dead of winter.

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 18 months ago from Home Sweet Home

      may i know, when you hike at mountain, trails, where do you find heat or fire to cook the rice?