ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Food and Cooking»
  • Culinary Arts & Cooking Techniques

How to Can Applesauce

Updated on February 28, 2015
How to Can Applesauce.
How to Can Applesauce.

Pies, tarts and eating fresh are all great ways to enjoy your apple harvest, but applesauce is the top dog when it comes to preserving it! After you've filled up on your fair share of fresh apples, it's time to turn the rest into a delicious treat. You'll not only make complete use of every viable apple, you'll also fill your pantry with enough applesauce to last you all throughout the chilly days of winter. With so much reward to be had, there's no reason why you should watch another apple fall to the ground and rot away. In this article we'll dive right into the basics of how to can applesauce in the comforts of your own kitchen. You won't want to miss out on this one!

_________________________________________________________

Materials Needed -

Preserving applesauce by canning it will require a bit more equipment than say if you froze it, but the extra supplies are definitely worth the reward! Choosing canning over freezing will not only free up space in your freezer, it will create a shelf-stable product that will last over a year in storage. Here's a look at the materials needed for canned applesauce:

Supplies for canning applesauce.
Supplies for canning applesauce.
  • A Variety of Apples
  • Cinnamon & Brown Sugar (Optional)
  • One Lemon
  • Peeler/Corer
  • Dutch Oven/Baking Pan with Lid
  • Canning Jars, Lids, and Can Rings
  • Large Stockpot
  • Jar Grabber
  • Funnel
  • Lid Magnet

_________________________________________________________

Choosing the Right Apples for Applesauce -

When it comes down to it, there's really no apple that can't be turned into applesauce. That said, you'll want to choose at least three different varieties to create a well structured and flavorful applesauce. Below you'll find a list of the top five apple varieties prized for making applesauce. Use a variety of these tried and true performers, or branch our and try a new combination!

  • Gala - A popular apple for eating fresh, these apples are equally as good in applesauce.
  • Fuji - Uniquely sweet, these apples lend a hand in creating a complex flavor throughout your applesauce.
  • Golden Delicious - This variety develops a rich apple flavor when cooked.
  • Red Delicious - Bringing a satisfying texture and mild flavor to the table, Red Delicious apples are a great addition to applesauce.
  • Jazz - The candy-like flavor of these apples is superb in everything!

My homemade applesauce was made from Liberty, Pink Lady, Spitzenburg, Autumn Glory & Granny Smith Apples.
My homemade applesauce was made from Liberty, Pink Lady, Spitzenburg, Autumn Glory & Granny Smith Apples.

_________________________________________________________

Canned Applesauce Recipes -

Now that you've chosen the apples for your sauce, it's time to move right along to a recipe that will combine them all together! For this particular hub, I'll be demonstrating the small batch recipe, but for those of you out there that need more than a few small jars, I've also included a proper large batch recipe.

Large Batch Recipe -

  • 72 Medium Size Apples (~ One Bushel)
  • 8 Tablespoons Brown Sugar
  • 8 Teaspoons Ground Cinnamon
  • 6 Quart Size Mason Jars (24 Cups)

Small Batch Applesauce Recipe -

  • 18 Medium Size Apples
  • 2 Tablespoons Brown Sugar (Optional)
  • 2 Teaspoons Ground Cinnamon (Optional)
  • 3 Pint Size Mason Jars (6 Cups)

_________________________________________________________

Preparing and Baking Your Apples -

This stage of the applesauce making process will be the most tedious and time consuming, but if there's no pain, then there's no gain, right?

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Anti-browning lemon water bath. Peeling and coring. Apple slices ready to be baked.
Anti-browning lemon water bath.
Anti-browning lemon water bath.
Peeling and coring.
Peeling and coring.
Apple slices ready to be baked.
Apple slices ready to be baked.
  1. Fill a large bowl or stockpot with cold water and add the juice of your lemon (1/2 lemon for small batches, or the whole lemon for large batches). This lemony water bath will keep your apples from browning as you peel, core and slice.
  2. Peel, core and slice your apples. This stage can be completed with a vegetable peeler and paring knife, but will go much quicker if you have an apple corer/peeler on hand!
  3. Once you've prepped all of your apple slices, go ahead and preheat your oven to 400°F.
  4. Reserve a half cup of your lemon water and drain off the rest.
  5. Add your drained apple slices and half cup of water to a dutch oven or similar lidded baking pan. The half cup of lemon water will keep your apples nice and moist as they cook in the oven.
  6. Place the lid on your pan and bake the apples. For a chunky textured applesauce, bake your apples for 35-45 minutes. If you like your applesauce smooth and creamy, leave them in the oven for 1 hour.

_________________________________________________________

Preparing Your Water Bath & Canning Supplies -

While your apple slices are cooking away in the oven, you can begin setting up all the supplies needed for canning.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Use a canning rack or similar object to keep your jars from coming into direct contact with the bottom of your stockpot. A flattened pie tin works great. Loading your jars. Needing only three pint jars, I filled the rest of the space with "dummy" jars. This keeps my smaller ones from falling over while boiling. Cover the jars you plan to use with one inch of water. Sanitize your lids by bringing water to a near boiling temperature.
Use a canning rack or similar object to keep your jars from coming into direct contact with the bottom of your stockpot. A flattened pie tin works great.
Use a canning rack or similar object to keep your jars from coming into direct contact with the bottom of your stockpot. A flattened pie tin works great.
Loading your jars. Needing only three pint jars, I filled the rest of the space with "dummy" jars. This keeps my smaller ones from falling over while boiling.
Loading your jars. Needing only three pint jars, I filled the rest of the space with "dummy" jars. This keeps my smaller ones from falling over while boiling.
Cover the jars you plan to use with one inch of water.
Cover the jars you plan to use with one inch of water.
Sanitize your lids by bringing water to a near boiling temperature.
Sanitize your lids by bringing water to a near boiling temperature.
  1. Place a canning rack, or similar object at the bottom of your stockpot. This "barrier" will keep your jars from coming into direct contact with the bottom of the pan. If a canning rack is not used, jars in direct contact with the bottom of the stockpot run a higher risk of breaking while boiling.
  2. Fill your large stockpot with enough water to completely submerge your clean canning jars (lids & rings removed) under at least one inch of water. Bring the jars to a rolling boil. This step will sanitize the inside of the jars.
  3. In a small saucepan, submerge the canning lids (shiny side down) in about an inch of water. Place the pan on a medium-low heat burner. The trick to sanitizing your canning lids is to keep them in water that is near boiling. Do not boil your lids as this could damage the seal even before you start canning.

_________________________________________________________

Making and Canning Applesauce -

Now that all the prep work is out of the way, we can finally move onto the exciting part!

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Baked apple slices, ready to be made into applesauce!Just applesauce! Applesauce with cinnamon and brown sugar. Filling up the jars.
Baked apple slices, ready to be made into applesauce!
Baked apple slices, ready to be made into applesauce!
Just applesauce!
Just applesauce!
Applesauce with cinnamon and brown sugar.
Applesauce with cinnamon and brown sugar.
Filling up the jars.
Filling up the jars.
  1. Remove the baked apples from the oven and strain off all of the excess water. (You can reserve this water and add it back in later if you prefer a thinner applesauce.)
  2. Add the apples to a blender or food processor and pulse until a desired consistency has been reached. If you choose to do so, now would be the time to add your sugar and spices!
  3. Remove the canning jars from the boiling water and and pour off any excess water. Fill the jars with hot applesauce, making sure to leave 1/2 inch headroom. Tap the jars to remove any air pockets and top off with applesauce if needed.
  4. Wipe the rim of each jar with a clean moist cloth. Using the lid magnet, grab the lids and place them onto each jar. Screw on the jar rings until they are "finger tight".
  5. With you jar grabber, gently place each jar upright into the boiling water bath. Make sure that the tops of the jars are still covered with at least one inch of boiling water. Process the jars by following the table below. Note that the higher elevation your at, the longer you'll boil your jars.

Applesauce Processing Times -

Jar Size
Sea Level - 1,000ft
1,001ft - 3,000ft
3,001ft - 6,000ft
6,001ft +
Pint
15 Min
20
20
25
Quart
20 Min
25
30
35
Applesauce jars in the boiling water bath.
Applesauce jars in the boiling water bath.

Once your applesauce jars have been in the water bath for the recommended time, remove the stockpot from the heat and allow the jars to sit in the hot water for an additional five minutes. (This helps the jars seal better.) Once five minutes have passed, remove the jars with your grabbers and allow them to cool on a cookie rack. Within a few minutes, the lids should make their classic "ping" sound, indicating that a successful seal has occurred. Let the jars cool undisturbed until they have reached room temperature. Check to make sure that all the jars have sealed. If any of the applesauce jars did not seal properly, place them in the refrigerator and consume within the next couple weeks.

_________________________________________________________

The finished homemade canned applesauce.
The finished homemade canned applesauce.

Sealed jars of applesauce should be stored in a cool and dark pantry until they are ready for use. In this fashion, your jars of homemade applesauce will keep fresh for more than a year! When you do choose to break into these beauties, you'll want to consume them within two weeks and keep them in the refrigerator during that time. I'd like to thank you for reading this guide on how to can applesauce. Please feel free to share any comments, tips or success stories!

Applesauce aside, what's your favorite type of apple?

See results

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 2 years ago from Northeast Ohio

      Great hub with delicious apple sauce recipes. Yummy!

    • Claudia Tello profile image

      Claudia Tello 3 years ago from Mexico

      Beautiful hub, congratulations! Now that I have become a homemade jam fan, this is great information.

    • lady rain profile image

      lady rain 3 years ago from Australia

      The applesauce looks delicious, just what I needed to preserve all those apples that are growing on my apple trees!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)