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How to Easily Make Hard-Boiled Eggs

Updated on April 25, 2018
VVanNess profile image

Victoria is a stay-at-home mom, author, blogger at Healthy at Home, and educator. She currently lives in Colorado with her family.

How to Easily Make Hard-Boiled Eggs
How to Easily Make Hard-Boiled Eggs | Source
5 stars from 1 rating of Hard-Boiled Eggs

You know, I'm embarrassed to admit that I only learned how to boil eggs about 10 years ago.

I remember buying my first house, finally having a large kitchen to cook in, and a dining room to serve guests in, and realizing, when asked to make my mom's deviled eggs, that I didn't know how to boil eggs. lol

Let's just say that at this time, I have made my fair share of delicious Easy Peasy Creamy Deviled Eggs, along with making hard-boiled eggs for many other reasons.

Of all the foods to eat, you simply can't go wrong with eggs. They are packed with tons of amazing nutrients.

Nutritional Benefit of Eggs

Eggs are a nutrient-rich, natural, whole food. These little gold mines are chock full of wonderful and important vitamins and nutrients that every human needs to stay healthy. Most importantly, eggs have long been recognized as a unique source of high-quality protein.

Just one little egg can have more protein than many other protein sources available. This also means that eating too many of them can be bad for your health and hard for your heart. lol

All B vitamins are found in eggs, including vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, choline, biotin, and folic acid. Folic acid is one of the nutrients that women trying to get pregnant, and those already carrying a child or breastfeeding, need the most.

Eggs are also a very good source of both selenium and iodine, which are nutrients that can be very difficult to find in other foods. Finally, just about all egg yolks contain critical omega-3 fats, which can provide significant amounts of anti-inflammatory fats.

The mineral content of eggs deserves special mention here, not because eggs are a rich source of most minerals, but because they are a rich source of certain minerals that can sometimes be difficult to obtain from other foods. (WHFoods)

Let's learn how to make these nutrient treasures on your own!!

Step One: Fill a small soup pot halfway with water and set it on the stove
Step One: Fill a small soup pot halfway with water and set it on the stove | Source
Step Two: Set your stove temperature to high heat and cover your pot
Step Two: Set your stove temperature to high heat and cover your pot | Source
Step Three: Bring your water to a rapid boil
Step Three: Bring your water to a rapid boil | Source

Cook Time

Prep time: 10 min
Cook time: 20 min
Ready in: 30 min
Yields: Serves each person 1 hard-boiled egg

Ingredients

  • Large eggs, any size, any color, any number
  • Enough water to cover your eggs
  • pinch salt

Instructions

  1. Fill a small soup pot at least halfway with water.
  2. You will want enough water to cover your eggs throughout the boiling process.
  3. Add a pinch of salt to your water.
  4. Cover your pot and set your stove temperature to high heat.
  5. Bring your water to a rapid boil.
  6. When your water is boiling, it is time to add in your eggs.
  7. Because the water is so hot, I've been burned and have dropped and broken the eggs. Therefore, I use salad tongs to gently add each of my eggs to the water.
  8. Boil on high heat for at least 20 minutes. If necessary, cover your pot to keep the splashing to a minimum.
  9. Just before your eggs are finished, fill a large mixing bowl with ice and set it near the sink.
  10. You will need it immediately and will want to have it on hand. You'll see why in a little bit.
  11. When your eggs are finished, pour the boiling water in the pot into the sink without disturbing your eggs.
  12. Immediately fill your pot with the ice you have ready.
  13. Then fill your pot with cold water.
  14. I even went and got another bowl of ice and filled my pot to the brim with it.
  15. Leave it for at least 30 minutes in its ice bath, but I suggest an hour.
  16. The ice and cold water are separating the cooked eggs from their shells. If done correctly, the shells will practically fall off and be super easy to remove.
  17. After an hour, pour out the cold water and ice.
  18. One at a time, break each of your eggs on the side of the sink, making sure to crack the shells all the way around, making them even easier to remove.
  19. Hold your eggs underneath a stream of water while removing the shells.
  20. They should each come off in one piece. That's the purpose of the ice.
  21. When finished, refrigerate your eggs in a sealed container until you are ready to eat them.
  22. They will likely only last a week or so.
  23. Enjoy!!
  24. Yummy! Yummy!
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Step Five: Boil your eggs for 20 minutes, making sure that the water level stays above the eggsStep Six: Set up a cutting board and knife for cutting your eggs in halfStep Seven: Set up your mixing area with dishes and ingredientsStep Eight: Fill a large mixing bowl with ice and set by the sinkStep Nine: As soon as your eggs are done, drain them in the sinkStep Ten: Immediately fill your pot with iceStep Eleven: On top of your ice, fill your pot with cold waterStep Twelve: Get another bowl of ice and top off your potStep Thirteen: Leave your eggs in their ice bath for at least 30 minutes to an hour (I left mine for an hour)Step Fourteen: After soaking, dump out your ice and ice waterStep Fifteen: One at a time, crack your egg shells on the side of the sink You'll want to make sure and crack them all the way around.Step Sixteen: Under running water, gently peel your eggshells offStep Seventeen: If you've done this right, the shells should come off all in one pieceDo this for all of your eggs.Step Eighteen: I would refrigerate them until you are ready for them and enjoy!!
Step Five: Boil your eggs for 20 minutes, making sure that the water level stays above the eggs
Step Five: Boil your eggs for 20 minutes, making sure that the water level stays above the eggs | Source
Step Six: Set up a cutting board and knife for cutting your eggs in half
Step Six: Set up a cutting board and knife for cutting your eggs in half | Source
Step Seven: Set up your mixing area with dishes and ingredients
Step Seven: Set up your mixing area with dishes and ingredients | Source
Step Eight: Fill a large mixing bowl with ice and set by the sink
Step Eight: Fill a large mixing bowl with ice and set by the sink | Source
Step Nine: As soon as your eggs are done, drain them in the sink
Step Nine: As soon as your eggs are done, drain them in the sink | Source
Step Ten: Immediately fill your pot with ice
Step Ten: Immediately fill your pot with ice | Source
Step Eleven: On top of your ice, fill your pot with cold water
Step Eleven: On top of your ice, fill your pot with cold water | Source
Step Twelve: Get another bowl of ice and top off your pot
Step Twelve: Get another bowl of ice and top off your pot | Source
Step Thirteen: Leave your eggs in their ice bath for at least 30 minutes to an hour (I left mine for an hour)
Step Thirteen: Leave your eggs in their ice bath for at least 30 minutes to an hour (I left mine for an hour) | Source
Step Fourteen: After soaking, dump out your ice and ice water
Step Fourteen: After soaking, dump out your ice and ice water | Source
Step Fifteen: One at a time, crack your egg shells on the side of the sink
Step Fifteen: One at a time, crack your egg shells on the side of the sink | Source
You'll want to make sure and crack them all the way around.
You'll want to make sure and crack them all the way around. | Source
Step Sixteen: Under running water, gently peel your eggshells off
Step Sixteen: Under running water, gently peel your eggshells off | Source
Step Seventeen: If you've done this right, the shells should come off all in one piece
Step Seventeen: If you've done this right, the shells should come off all in one piece | Source
Do this for all of your eggs.
Do this for all of your eggs. | Source
Step Eighteen: I would refrigerate them until you are ready for them and enjoy!!
Step Eighteen: I would refrigerate them until you are ready for them and enjoy!! | Source

Nutritional Information

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1 hard-boiled egg
Calories 78
Calories from Fat45
% Daily Value *
Fat 5 g8%
Saturated fat 2 g10%
Unsaturated fat 3 g
Carbohydrates 1 g
Sugar 1 g
Fiber 0 g
Protein 6 g12%
Cholesterol 187 mg62%
Sodium 62 mg3%
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.
The Sign of Good Food
The Sign of Good Food | Source

Personal Review

I learned the ice bath trick from my mom when I learned how to boil eggs. I had to try it out a few times before I actually mastered it though.

It's success depends on your eggs been boiled for long enough in rapidly boiling water, being covered in water through the cooking process, and been cooled down quick enough for long enough for the eggs to let go of their shells.

I've tried putting the eggs in first, I've tried boiling for longer, I've tried just cooling down in water, and just cooling for 10-20 minutes. None of these options worked right.

Instead of beautiful boiled eggs (which are especially critical for beautiful deviled eggs), I would end up with messy egg whites that had huge chunks taken out of them because the shells just wouldn't come off.

I think we've all been there!

With this tried and true, perfected method, you should have beautiful boiled eggs every time, as long as you follow my directions to the tee.

Good luck! I'd be glad to help if you're still struggling!

Quick Poll

How do you like to eat your hard-boiled eggs?

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© 2014 Victoria Van Ness

Comments

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    • VVanNess profile imageAUTHOR

      Victoria Van Ness 

      4 years ago from Fountain, CO

      I will! Thank you! I appreciate the comment. :)

    • Sonimanjari profile image

      Manjari Soni 

      4 years ago from India

      hey nice, good information. We generally tend to under or overcook eggs. This is a great way. If you love eggs I have put some easy egg recipes on my hub, do check them out. Thanks

    • VVanNess profile imageAUTHOR

      Victoria Van Ness 

      4 years ago from Fountain, CO

      Nice! Thank you for the great suggestion! :)

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 

      4 years ago from Central Florida

      I have a recipe for deviled eggs - one of my favorite finger foods! I use a small amount of Miracle Whip, salt and pepper, just a smidge of brown mustard, paprika and fresh dill. Yum!

    • VVanNess profile imageAUTHOR

      Victoria Van Ness 

      4 years ago from Fountain, CO

      lol Great! You should then make some of my Creamy Deviled Eggs with them!

      Thanks for the comment. Let me know how it turns out for you!

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 

      4 years ago from Central Florida

      Thanx for this info. I have a problem getting the shells to come off cleanly. The trick is the ice bath! Now I think I'll go boil some eggs and see how they peel.

    • VVanNess profile imageAUTHOR

      Victoria Van Ness 

      4 years ago from Fountain, CO

      lol I sure will! I didn't think I was going to have enough to write about either. Many of my recipes have been all about considering all of the finer details of what I do.

      Why do I do the things I do for each recipe? What might someone else need to know in order to replicate my experience? It's been an interesting process. lol

      Thank you so much for your comments!!

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 

      4 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      I didn't know that you would have enough material to write about hard boiled eggs... and you did.... and on top of it I learned something new :-)

      My first question to myself was "what can be so hard about hard boiled eggs"... and the answer is remove the shell after they are cooked. I always put my eggs in cold water after they are hard boiled but not in ice! I will definitly try that trick because it can be quite annoying to remove the shell when it sticks to the egg! Say thanks to your mom for that essential lesson :-)

    • VVanNess profile imageAUTHOR

      Victoria Van Ness 

      4 years ago from Fountain, CO

      lol Yum!! I love hard-boiled eggs. You can use them for so many wonderful meals. I might just have to make some egg salad next! Thanks for stopping by!!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 

      4 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      sorry no time to comment got to go check out your article on those pesky deviled ones!

    • VVanNess profile imageAUTHOR

      Victoria Van Ness 

      4 years ago from Fountain, CO

      Lol Thanks! I always love your comments. :)

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 

      4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I was doing a google search about a year ago to the question "how to" and was amazed that the leading search was on "how to hard-boil an egg." Evidently there are a lot of people who do not know how to do this...so this article should help. Nice introduction by the way.

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