ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Food and Cooking»
  • Culinary Arts & Cooking Techniques

How to Make Sun Dried Tomatoes

Updated on October 21, 2013

Basic Tools Needed To Dry Tomatoes

If you have the tomatoes, you don't need too much else to successfully create delicious sun-dried tomatoes.

Supplies needed:

tomatoes

food dehydrator

sharp knife

If you don't have a food dehydrator, you will also need:

a baking pan or cookie sheet

Cookie cooling racks

non-stick vegetable spray

oven

Making Sun Dried Tomatoes Out Of Necessity

Years ago, after a particularly abundant tomato crop, I decided to try my hand at creating sun dried tomatoes. At the time, we lived in the high desert of Southern California. We had just built our first house and our backyard was a barren landscape. We had no budget for adding an irrigation system and the view out our back window was a stretch of desert hardpan called caliche soil.

Feeling the need to grow something, we selected a little spot near the back door and an outdoor spigot to which we add bags and bags of soil amendment. Into this spot went eight tomato plants. We figured we would lose about half of them, ultimately giving us four plants. Completely manageable, right?

Tomato plant at my home in Indiana.
Tomato plant at my home in Indiana. | Source

What To Do With Too Many Tomatoes?

Well, those plants just LOVED that spot! We had a continuous crop of tomatoes straight through the summer and well near to Thanksgiving time. While we enjoy tomatoes, there was no way just my husband and I could keep up with eating the supply. We passed them out to all of our neighbors and co-workers and still had an over-abundance. I processed some for the freezer, but by October, I was running out of ideas, freezer space and my taste for tomatoes.

Maybe it was some latent southern Italian genetic embedment (my grandmother is from a little town in the toe of Italy), but I got the idea that Mojave Desert in which we lived was the perfect environment to create sun dried tomatoes. It was not unusual to have days over 105 °F and not a cloud in the sky. Perfect for creating sun-dried tomatoes. However, by the time I came up with this idea, it is not nearly that hot during the day since it was October. Still sunny and warm, but not over 100 degrees.

The barren landscape of our first home.
The barren landscape of our first home. | Source

Experimenting With Different Drying Methods

This was before the days of the internet, so I did not immediately look online to figure out how to make sun-dried tomatoes. In fact, I didn’t even check out a library book. I opted for trial and error. The first thing I tried was just to slice up some tomatoes and set them on a tray out in the hot sun. We practically never saw a fly in the desert, so I wasn’t too worried about the possibility of flies landing all over the tomatoes. After several days of sun exposure, some of the slices did get a little leathery, but most just looked like tomatoes that had gone bad. Some had black splotches and I even detected a tiny bit of green mold…something that I rarely saw when we lived in the desert, even on an old loaf of bread.

The next thing I tried was to slow dry them in the oven. I heard of somebody else trying this method and it sounded easy. I sliced up the tomatoes, placed them on a cookie sheet set the oven on its very lowest ‘keep warm’ setting. It worked. I processed several batches. I even figured out that if I sprayed a cookie cooling rack with vegetable spray, the tomatoes would stick less and pop right off without any scraping from the pan. I could only make a couple of sheets at a time, which wasn’t all that many tomatoes. It took a day or two for the tomatoes to dry out, depending on how thickly I sliced them. One day, out of frustration, I turned the oven up, just a teensy bit. The tomatoes did dry faster, but I found that some of the more thinly sliced tomatoes dried more quickly and could end up the slightest bit over cooked, i.e. burned.

Some tomatoes from this year's crop.  Make sure you trim out the bad spots before drying.
Some tomatoes from this year's crop. Make sure you trim out the bad spots before drying. | Source

Using A Dehydrator To Create Sun-Dried Tomatoes

The first frost was on its way. Yes, it does get that cold in the desert in the winter. So, I harvested everything that was left, even the green ones. I let everything ripen on the counter for a few days and then proceeded to process them a few pans at a time. This took forever! I did finally get them all dried and we ate sun dried tomatoes all through the winter, but that Christmas, I asked for a food dehydrator as a gift.

Things went VERY well after that.

I practiced with other fruits, such as apples and grapes, to get my techniques worked out before the next tomato season. We once again had a bumper crop of tomatoes, so I got to practice my skills and I dried so many batches of tomatoes that year that I was able to give packages of sun-dried tomatoes out as Christmas gifts.

Have you ever preserved food by dehydrating or drying it?

See results
I still keep my dehydrator in its original box when not in use.  It keeps the dust out.
I still keep my dehydrator in its original box when not in use. It keeps the dust out. | Source

Reviving The Use Of The Dehydrator

For the eleven years we lived in the High Desert, we always had wonderful crops of tomatoes. This was especially true after we finally got a drip irrigation system installed and our yard landscaped. True, our landscape consisted of several tons of rocks we distributed, but hey, it was a great way to have a groomed yard without using up valuable water.

We moved to Indiana nine years ago to a home that was already landscaped. We found ways to tuck a few tomato plants into the flower beds here and there, but usually the supply of tomatoes is just enough to keep our family of four and a few neighbors happy during the summer.

However, this summer, things were a little different. For some reason, our tomatoes didn’t really start producing until mid-September. Once they started, they did so with abundance. I dusted off my food dehydrator and decided to try my hand again at drying tomatoes. It has been nine years, so my skills were a little rusty and I discovered that my now 20 year old food dehydrator still worked, but doesn’t have the bells and whistles that the newer versions have.

My older but still serviceable model.  It is a Mr. Coffee brand dehydrator.
My older but still serviceable model. It is a Mr. Coffee brand dehydrator. | Source

Oven Or Dehydrator: The Methods Are Similar

  1. Wash and towel dry the tomatoes.
  2. Slice the tomatoes. I have tried this two ways. The first way is to slice them into quarters. The second way is to cut them into slices as you would for placement on a sandwich. They dry faster if sliced as for a sandwich.
  3. Remove the pulpy seeds. You can just slide your thumb into the seed containing sections and the seeds and pulp pop right out.
  4. Layer the tomatoes either on a cookie cooling rack that has been sprayed with non-stick cooking spray or on the trays of your dehydrator. If using the oven, place the cookie cooling rack inside of a cookie sheet.
  5. Oven method: Set oven to the lowest setting. Often this is labeled as ‘keep warm’. Depending on the thickness of your slices and your oven, this could happen in 8-12 hours or one to two days. When you are experimenting with your own equipment, check the dryness of the tomatoes often. Tomatoes are done when they are of a leathery consistency.
  6. If using a dehydrator, just fill up and stack the trays. My dehydrator takes about 36 hours to dry when it is fully loaded. If you have a dehydrator with a temperature setting, 140 °F is the suggested temperature at which to dry tomatoes.
Slide the seeds out with your thumb.  This is for a tomato cut into quarters.
Slide the seeds out with your thumb. This is for a tomato cut into quarters. | Source
When slice sandwich style, I cut off the stem end first, then stick my thumb into each section to remove the seeds.  Then I continue to slice.
When slice sandwich style, I cut off the stem end first, then stick my thumb into each section to remove the seeds. Then I continue to slice. | Source
Tomatoes placed on a drying rack of my dehydrator.  I grow both yellow and red tomatoes for variety.
Tomatoes placed on a drying rack of my dehydrator. I grow both yellow and red tomatoes for variety. | Source
Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1/4 cup
Calories 35
Calories from Fat0
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.

How To Store Sun Dried Tomatoes

I store my sun dried tomatoes in a plastic, self-sealing bag. They will keep in your cupboard, but if I'm not going to use them immediately, I keep them in the freezer.

Food Dehydrator

Waring Pro DHR30 Professional Dehydrator
Waring Pro DHR30 Professional Dehydrator

This model is similar to what I use. It has temperature settings which make it much more flexible to use for a variety of food products.

 

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Anne Harrison profile image

      Anne Harrison 4 years ago from Australia

      Summer's just starting here… I look forward to trying this in a few months. voted up

    • abhijeet4800 profile image

      Abhijeet Ganguly 4 years ago from Pune, India

      Nice hub !!! Thanks for sharing....

    • abhijeet4800 profile image

      Abhijeet Ganguly 4 years ago from Pune, India

      Nice hub !!! Thanks for sharing....

    • thumbi7 profile image

      JR Krishna 4 years ago from India

      This is a great way to store extra tomatoes.

      Thanks for sharing

    • ibescience profile image
      Author

      ibescience 4 years ago

      Interesting to hear you say that you only had two survivors this summer HeatherH104. I can't tell you how many people have mentioned that they had an 'odd tomato year'! The most frequent comment I hear is that people say that their tomatoes just didn't produce like they usually do. There's always next year!

    • HeatherH104 profile image

      HeatherH104 4 years ago from USA

      Love it! I only had two tomato plants survive this summer which was the perfect amount for our family of four but I love this idea.

      Perfect way to avoid waste and still enjoy your tomatoes over the winter.

      Voted up and shared.

      Heather

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)