ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How to Preserve Food With Sorbic Acid

Updated on March 27, 2011

Protect Toxin Produced by Microorganisms

Foodstuffs can be produced, processed or prepared in the home on a small scale. This is only possible if the requirements of the modern consumer can be met - that the foods will keep safe for a sufficient length of time. Most food is only available fresh for a relatively short period but we want to enjoy them throughout the year. This therefore is a good enough reason why we need to preserve food.

Food must be preserved not only to prevent losses but also to protect them from toxin which is produced by microorganisms and then transmitted to the food. The botulinus toxin is produced by clostridiae when meat products are stored in airtight containers. The botulinus toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known today. One part per millionth of a gramme is enough to kill you. If the bacteria forming botulinus toxin is prevented, no toxin will be produced and the meat can be safely preserved and stored in airtight containers.

Sorbic Acid

Safest Preservative

Sorbic acid has an LD50 of 10g/kg body weight which make it the safest preservative known. In comparison, the common table salt has an LD50 of 5g/kg body weight and that is in addition that common table salt is added to food in greater quantities than Sorbic acid. In terms of chronic toxity, Sorbic acid is much more favourable than other preservatives. In rats, feeding of large quantities of Sorbic acid will have the effect of prolongation of the average lifespan of rats as they become more resistant to infections.

Aflatoxin is Highly Carcinogenic

Fungi can also produce mycotoxins. The most dangerous of mycotoxins is aflatoxin which occurs on moldy cereals, nuts and other moldy foods. Aflatoxin is extremely dangerous because it is highly carcinogenic.

To protect food from microbiological damage, you can either use physical methods of preservation or chemical preservatives methods of preservation. Physical methods include use of drying, heating like in pasteurization, cooling like in de-freezing, irradiation and sterile filtration.

Chemical preservatives involve use of chemicals like the common table salt. Chemical methods are cheaper than physical methods. Both physical and chemical methods will alter the aroma and flavor of food.

Sorbic Acid

Sorbic acid was discovered in 1859 by reacting rowanberry oil (from the juice of unripe rowanberry) with strong alkalis. Sorbic acid has antimicrobial effect. Alkali sorbates have good solubility in water. Potassium sorbate can be made into solutions of more than 50% in cold water. Potassium sorbate is the salt of Sorbic acid that is mainly used in food preservations. As an aliphatic carboxytic acid, Sorbic acid is utilized in human and animal bodies like any other fatty acid.


Safer Than Common Table Salt

Sorbic acid has an LD50 of 10g/kg body weight which make it the safest preservative known. In comparison, the common table salt has an LD50 of 5g/kg body weight and that is in addition that common table salt is added to food in greater quantities than Sorbic acid. In terms of chronic toxity, Sorbic acid is much more favourable than other preservatives. In rats, feeding of large quantities of Sorbic acid will have the effect of prolongation of the average lifespan of rats as they become more resistant to infections.

Sorbic acid is not carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic. The main action of Sorbic acid is to inhibit the growth of fungi and yeasts - it acts against bacteria. The maximum quantity of Sorbic acid permissible is 0.2 percent relative to the food to be preserved. Use Sorbic acid to preserve cheese, margarine, butter, mayonnaise, tomato juice, etc., etc. Use Sorbic acid with small quantities of sulfur dioxide and or pasteurization to preserve fruit juices and marmalades. Use Sorbic acid to remove cloudiness in wines.

Sorbic acid is approved in almost all countries including USA.

If you have liked this article, and you would want this page to
keep up and improved, you can help by purchasing some great items from Amazon
by following Amazon links and widgets on this page, if you will. A free way to
help would be to link back to this webpage from your web page, blog, or
discussion forums.
 
The Author’s page is designed to help beginners and average
readers make some money as an extra income to supplement what they may be earning
elsewhere - details of which you can find in My Page..

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • ngureco profile imageAUTHOR

      ngureco 

      6 years ago

      The maximum quantity of Sorbic acid permissible is 0.2 percent relative to the food to be preserved. Test with 200 ppm (0.02%).

    • profile image

      Makafui Segbawu 

      6 years ago

      Pls. inform what is a ratio of Potassium Sorbate used per KG of Product to preserve Milk based sweets for long time. Thank you.

    • profile image

      Shailesh Shah, IND 

      7 years ago

      Pls. inform what is a ratio of Potassium Sorbate used per KG of Product to preserve Milk based sweets for long time. Thank you.

    • Charlotte Anne profile image

      Charlotte Anne 

      9 years ago from Iowa, USA

      Very interesting.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)