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How to Use Cooking Oils Correctly

Updated on September 15, 2013
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Cooking With the Proper Oils

If you are like most people who enjoy cooking and baking, then chances are that you have used oil in your recipes or have used it to fry with. But how well do you know your oils? Are you aware that there are certain oils that you use for frying, others for baking, and some for cooking? Do you know which oils are considered good for you and which are not? Do you know what is in oils? Do you know the proper "smoking point" for oils?

When a recipe uses the generic term "vegetable oil", which oil would you use? Corn oil, soybean oil, olive oil, canola oil.... or does it really make a difference? What if a recipe calls for canola oil. Is it okay to use any other vegetable oil you may have on hand?

Whether you are baking, cooking, or frying with oils, it's always best to understand the oil that is needed, it's purpose and nutritional value. Not only will your food taste better, you can actually save money by using the correct oil for what you are making.

There are dozens of wonderful oils available to us. The following oils I have chosen below are some of the most common cooking oils used in cooking, baking and frying. The nutritional facts and characteristics of each oil supply enough information to use as a guide on using cooking oils correctly.

The Oils in Your Cupboard

What is Your Favorite Oil to Cook/Bake With?

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What are oils?

Oils are produced from many different plants and fish. Although oils are not considered a food group, they do provide essential nutrients and therefore are included in food patterns recognized by the USDA.

To maintain good health, it is important to include a variety of "healthy fats" in our diet. These fats are found naturally in different oils. It is also a good rule of the thumb to make sure your intake of these healthy fats (oils) are consumed in moderation.

There are three types of fats found in natural fats:

  • Saturated fats: Solid at room temperature and considered very stable. Because they resist oxidation, they can tolerate higher temperatures for cooking and frying.
  • Polyunsaturated fats: Liquid at room temperature and for the most part is the least stable for cooking. They are found in safflower and sunflower oils and oxidize easily. Unless they are properly labeled for high heat, do not use them for frying.
  • Monounsaturated fats: Liquid at room temperature. They are more stable than polyunsaturated fats and can be found in canola, nuts and olives.

Nutritional Values

OIL (Per tbsp)
CALORIES
FAT
CARBS
PROTEIN
CALORIE BREAKDOWN
VEGETABLE
120
13.6g
0g
0g
100% fat
OLIVE
119
13.5g
0g
0g
100% fat
CANOLA
124
14g
0g
0g
100% fat
SOYBEAN
40
4.5g
0g
0g
100% fat
SUNFLOWER
120
13.6g
0g
0g
100% fat
CORN
120
13.6g
0g
0g
100% fat
SESAME
119
13.5g
0g
0g
100% fat
PEANUT
120
13.6g
0g
0g
100% fat
COCONUT
117
13.6g
0g
0g
100% fat

Cooking with Oils Correctly: Smoke points and Characters

OIL
NO HEAT
LOW HEAT
MED. HEAT
MED. HIGH HEAT
HIGH HEAT
CHARACTER /USE
Olive Oil (Extra Virgin) Unrefined
X
X
 
 
 
Wide range of flavors, Best for cold dishes, salads, pesto and dipping bread
Canola Refined
X
X
X
X
X
Great "all-purpose" oil with Neutral Flavor
Coconut (virgin/extra virgin) Unrefined
X
X
 
 
 
Neutral to mild flavors. Great in soups, stews, curries and baked goods.
Peanut, Refined
X
X
 
 
 
Great for tempura, fish, stir-fries and Asian dishes. Potential allergen. Heat tolerance can vary greatly.
Sesame, Refined
X
X
X
X
X
Great flavorfor seared meats, stir-fries.
Sunflower (high oleic), Refined
X
X
X
X
X
Neutral, all-purpose oil, good source of vitamin E.
Sunflower, Unrefined
X
X
X
X
X
Rich flavor, best in cold dishes, good source of vitamin E.
Soybean, Unrefined
X
X
X
X
X
Popular edible oil, won't compromise flavor of food
Corn, Refined
X
X
X
 
 
A favorite for frying and baking.
Safflower, Refined
X
X
X
X
X
Great all-purpose oil with a mild flavor

Refined VS Unrefined

Unrefined Oils
An example of unrefined oils is sesame and olive oil. Unrefined oils are lightly filtered to remove the large particles. These types of oils may appear cloudy and may also have a little settling after sitting for awhile, however, this does not affect the quality of the oil.

Unrefined oils are more favorable and have pronounced colors and fragrances.

Because unrefined oils are more nutritious, they have a shorter shelf life than refined.

Unrefined oils have natural resins and particles that will burn easily. If overheated, they will develop unpleasant flavors as well as unhealthy properties. If you use unrefined oils in your baking, be prepared to have the flavor more pronounced. The best way to use unrefined oils is unheated in dressings or sautéing with low heat, and baking.

Refined Oils
Refining natural oils reduces the levels of nutrients and flavors. This is because the oils are filtered and strained more thoroughly than unrefined oils. This is usually done with heat but without any harsh or damaging chemicals.

By filtering the oils more thoroughly, this process also removes any particles or resins and therefore makes the naturally refined oils more stable with a longer shelf life. They are also far more resistant to smoking and are considered “high heat” oil for cooking and frying. The most common refined oils are commonly known as “high oleic” oils which are excellent for high-heat cooking and deep frying. Safflower, peanut oil, and sunflower oil are the favorites used. These are from the varieties that are high in monounsaturated fats, and have a high "smoking point".

The most Common Questions about using Cooking Oils correctly

  • Even though some cooking oils have a "High Smoking Point", should I heat the oils to their smoke point?

Absolutely not! If you heat your oil to the point where it smokes in the pan, DISCARD IT! The temperature is way too high. Clean the pan and start over at a lower temperature. When oil smokes, it is a clear indication that the oil has been damaged and has potentially started to develop cancer-causing properties.

  • Can I use Olive oil for all my cooking and baking?

It is not a good idea! Extra virgin olive oil has wonderful health benefits which contain heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and phenols. Even with all the many health benefits, in order to maximize those benefits, it’s best to use olive oil on salads, in dips, or for lower-heat cooking.

  • What is the best way to store cooking oils?

All oils will remain liquid at room temperature. Always store your oils in a dark and dry place, such as your pantry or cupboard. Refined oils, such as olive oil and canola oil, that are highest in monounsaturated fats have a 3-4 year shelf life, however, those oils with a lower level of monounsaturated fats such as extra virgin and virgin olive oils will last about a year after it is opened. Most of the additional oils will last approximately 6-8 months once opened.

Source

Olive Oil

Olive oil is recognized as the most healthy of all the oils consumed. It is high in monounsaturated fats which is a key factor in the aid of reducing the risk of heart disease. Besides it's wonderful flavor, many people use olive oil daily in their meals. Olive oil comes in many different varieties which include: virgin, extra virgin, light, extra light, and refined. The most common olive oil that is widely used is the extra virgin variety.
Olive oil is excellent when used for stir-frying, cooking, sauteing, and especially as an ingredient in recipes. The most common use for olive oil is on salads, whether mixed with vinegar, or drizzled on.

Soybean Oil

Soybean oil is probably the most popular edible oil used in the world. It is widely used in almost all margarine’s and shortenings. It is also used in the following:

  • Mayonnaise
  • Salad dressings
  • Imitation dairy products
  • Commercially baked goods
  • Frozen foods
  • Breads and crackers
  • Non-dairy creamers
  • Barbecue sauces

The reason why most chefs and bakers use soybean oil is that it has little flavor, therefore it won’t interfere with the taste of the food that is prepared.
Soybean oil is great for frying as it has a high smoke point of 440ºF compared to 425ºF which is a minimum requirement for frying.

Source

Vegetable Oil

Vegetable Oil is probably the most commonly used of all the oils. It can be found frequently for use in recipes and can also be used for frying. Vegetable oil is actually a blend of several oils, such as corn, soybean, palm and sunflower.

Canola Oil

Canola oil is another cooking oil that is said to have many health benefits including low saturated fat content and high mono unsaturated fat. Although it is one of the favorite oils to fry with, be sure to use it with medium frying temperatures (approximately 450 degrees F).

Source

Coconut Oil

Coconut oil comes in 3 types: Virgin, extra virgin, and unrefined. The flavor of coconut oil can range from a very mild flavor to to a neutral flavor. Coconut oil is highly used in soups and stews and curries. It is also well used in recipes for baking.

Corn Oil

Corn oil has relatively low levels of saturated and monounsaturated fats. Corn oil is a favorite for frying and baking. When frying with corn oil, it should only be used with medium temperatures. It is also widely used in margarine's.

Sesame Oil

Sesame oil is available in Light and Dark. Sesame oil is a great substitute for olive oil or vegetable oil when sautéing food. It can also be blended with other oils to create different flavors

When using sesame oil in a deep fryer, be sure to use “light” sesame oil as it has a high smoke point and will not burn at high temperatures, whereas “dark” sesame oil is not good for deep frying due to it’s lower smoke point and will burn if used for deep frying.

Source

Sunflower Oil

Sunflower Oil is an excellent source of Vitamin E and also low in saturated fat. Sunflower Oil is highly preferred when frying or mixed in a salad dressing. Because of it's health benefits, many food manufacturers and restaurants use it more than any other oil.

Peanut Oil

When frying in high temperatures, peanut oil is perfect to use. Peanut oil is very popular during the holidays as many people use it in their turkey fryers to fry their turkeys.

Elizabeth Rayen
Elizabeth Rayen | Source

About the Author

Lisa has directed and acted in musical theatre for nearly 30 years. Her musical upbringing allowed her to pursue her career in teaching and directing and continues to direct shows today. As the owner of 2 online Home Décor sites, Lisa’s passion for Rustic Living all begins with her love for the home, outdoors, and her many hobbies. Lisa loves to laugh, and she share’s that love through her comedic hubs centered on her MOM. Lisa’s passions include writing, directing, acting, photography, singing, cooking, crafts, gardening, and home improvement, including decorating. Lisa also writes under her penned name, Elizabeth Rayen.

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Comments: How to Use Cooking Oils Correctly

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    • Just Ask Susan profile image

      Susan Zutautas 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      I've always wondered about all the different types of oils and will usually follow a recipe i.e. if it says use corn oil I'll use corn oil. Your charts are very helpful and I'll keep them handy. Great hub!

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Susan! I have too. I really learned a lot about cooking oils and the smoke point of each. There is so much info out there and so many types of oils available. I had to really think about what I wanted to cover.. I think 10 more hubs could be written along with this one...lol

    • RealHousewife profile image

      Kelly Umphenour 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

      I love this! Lisa I have every kind of oil you mentioned and also Walnut oil. I have them because maybe one recipe called for a tablespoon so I had to buy the whole dam bottles.

      I am so glad you did this...now maybe I can figure out how to best use it up. I have some dark sesame and I use that a lot but the other stuff?

    • Melovy profile image

      Yvonne Spence 4 years ago from UK

      This was useful Lisa. I have seen the term "high oleic" before, but had no idea what it meant. I've noticed it on the Sparks people and Cronometer nutritional calculators, so from now on I will know to choose to work out the correct nutritional value.

      I only ever buy organic oils because of pesticide residue and we don't readily get organic corn oil in the UK so I rarely use it and usually substitute sunflower or rapeseed oil if a recipe calls for corn oil. In the UK canola is called rapeseed oil (just looked that up because I wondered what canola was.) Great hub, voted up and useful.

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      You sound like me Kelly.. I have about 13 different oils of which only about half of them is what I use most of the time! I actually really enjoyed doing this hub because I learned so much. I love dark sesame as well.. us it a lot with my Asian dishes. I'm happy you enjoyed it Kelly! ♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
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      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Yvonne! I didn't know the term "high oleic" as well until I did my research. I love organic oils. Good call on the substitute for corn oil. Thank you so much for your comment. ♥

    • Lilleyth profile image

      Suzanne Sheffield 4 years ago from Mid-Atlantic

      Yes, this is well-needed information. Thumbs up.

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Lilleyth! ♥

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 4 years ago from San Francisco

      Thank you for this. My new wife is slowly learning why my daughter uses so many different types of oils. My daughter is a professional chef.

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      That is awesome Mhatter! I'm sure your daughter can teach your new bride some wonderful uses for the oils. ♥

    • Denise Handlon profile image

      Denise Handlon 4 years ago from North Carolina

      Well I've learned several new things reading this hub, thanks. It'll be very useful in the future. This hub must have taken you a very long time to construct. Lots of research here. Thanks for sharing...what motivated you to write on this subject?

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you so much Denise! I use a lot of different oils with my recipes. I usually add the oil that is listed in the recipe, however, I am always looking for a way to cut calories, fats, and salt in any recipe I can and still try to manage to keep it tasty. This hub was an exclusive title that was available so I claimed it with the thought that this would be a great opportunity to encourage myself to learn more about the oils and their uses. I was really surprised how little I knew about my oils. ♥

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 4 years ago from Arizona

      I was particularly interested to find out temperatures for using oil. We use a lot of sesame and grapeseed oil...and olive oil for salad dressings etc. Great job on educating us all on the different oils. Voting UP and sharing.

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 4 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      Such an excellent hub! I am glad to learn so much about all the different oils and when they work the best. Voting up and more! :)

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      What an interesting hub and thank you so much for sharing. I vote up and share.

      Eddy.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 4 years ago from New York

      Its so confusing with all the different properties of all the different oils. Thank you for this hub! Voted up, useful, and interesting.

    • Deborah-Diane profile image

      Deborah-Diane 4 years ago from Orange County, California

      Interesting information about cooking oils. Thanks!

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Carol! I knew there were some oils not for frying, etc, but what I learned from researching was the "Smoke points" of each oil. That was really interesting to me as well. Thanks for the vote up! ♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Hi Sheila!! So good to see you! Thank you so much for your sweet comment. I did have a lot of fun researching this subject. I hope it helps you as much as it has helped me! ♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
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      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Hi Eddy, so good to see you again! So happy to share! Hope you have a wonderful holiday! ♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      You are so welcome Mary! I am glad you enjoyed the hub! ♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
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      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Deborah-Diane! Glad you enjoyed the hub as well! ♥

    • Lord De Cross profile image

      Joseph De Cross 4 years ago

      Excellent lay-out for cooking oil and its varieties. The charts are so informative Lisa. This selection gave me a wider scope of oils. Glad to see you re-pimping some of your hubs. Take care dear!

    • Rusticliving profile image
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      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Lord. I don't think I do enough pimping of my own. I need to do better. Glad ya liked the hub. You are such a dear! ♥

    • alocsin profile image

      alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

      I'm not much of a cook but my partner is. I'm printing this out to give to him. Voting this Up and Useful.

    • Rusticliving profile image
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      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Very cool alocsin! I hope this will be very helpful for him! ♥

    • Dolores Monet profile image

      Dolores Monet 4 years ago from East Coast, United States

      A wonderful helpful hub. I have cooked from scratch for years and use a variety of oils. But I never really paid attention to the properties of oils so this was very informative.

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Delores! I'm so pleased that this information is and can be helpful for you! ♥

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 4 years ago from California

      Great article!

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Audrey! :)

    • Nicole Rodgers profile image

      Nicole Rodgers 4 years ago from Albuquerque, New Mexico

      Truth is, most of the vegetable oils we buy are hydrogenated oils, something our bodies cannot process fully. They are chemically produced and the residue remains in our kidneys and is very difficult to cleanse. Also, by the time we buy the oil, it is going rancid because of the chemical treatment and the means of storage. I recommend the book, "The coconut Oil Miracle."

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      I totally agree Nicole. There are so many oils available to us and we are (for the most part) are uneducated on the oils and for that matter..all foods, that are best for our bodies. I thank you for the info on the book. I am always looking for a better way to eat and use our foods properly. I was given this title to write the hub and where there are more oils that are better for our health, the main focus and search was how to use the oils at the right temperature, etc. Thank you so much for your comment. I am definitely going to look for that book! ♥

    • Victoria Lynn profile image

      Victoria Lynn 4 years ago from Arkansas, USA

      This is great to know! I've wondered about this stuff. I actually heard on The Doctors today not to use olive oil at high heats, like you say. I never knew! Good to know! Sharing this one!

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Vicki! I actually learned that little tidbit myself while doing my research on the topic. I will use olive oil sometimes when I stir fry as it doesn't quite get to the high point like it would when you deep fry. Thanks for the shares. :)

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Incredible advice here on How to Use the different Cooking Oils Correctly, a healthy way and is such a helpful way too.

    • Vinaya Ghimire profile image

      Vinaya Ghimire 4 years ago from Nepal

      We use mustard oil while cooking. We grow mustard in our own farm.

      Too much oil is bad for health, but oil is also necessary for our body. Thanks for sharing this useful and informative article.

    • Redberry Sky profile image

      Redberry Sky 4 years ago

      Useful article that will come in very handy - I love to cook, but I always end up forgetting which oil I should use for which cooking method! Handy reference guide and a great look-up table - I'll never have to scramble for the info again! Bookmarked and voted up :)

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you so much DDE. I'm glad you enjoyed it! ♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Vinaya! I don't think I ever heard of mustard oil. Is it used for high heat cooking or similar to olive oil?

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you Redberry Sky! I actually learned a lot while researching for this hub. There is so much more to learn. I only begain to cover the basics but so happy it can help us learn which oils are good for us and used properly.♥

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 4 years ago from Nashville Tn.

      What valuable information this is for learning about cooking oils. I had no idea that cooking oil to it's smoke point was dangerous. I've done it before. ( gulp .)

      I will be sharing this hub all over the place to help others be informed. I can't be the only Martha Stewart that is in the dark about this. :)

      Thanks for the great list you've provided spotlighting the various types of oil. Very helpful!

      Voted up useful, awesome, interesting and will pin, tweet, FB and more. Thanks again!

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you vocalcoach! There are some wonderful hubs out there regarding How to use the proper oil for cooking. I just hope this contributes to the best of them. I learned a lot when I researched information for this hub and so happy that I did. I see oils in a whole different light! Thanks so much for the votes and shares! ♥

    • prettynutjob30 profile image

      Mary 4 years ago from From the land of Chocolate Chips,and all other things sweet.

      Great hub, voted up, more and shared, I didn't realize how healthy some cooking oils really are for. I did however learn the hard way that organic olive oil is not good for making fried okra, my pan was crispy, lol.

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      lol prettynutjob30! So... it's good to know I wasn't the only one who learned the hard way! :) So glad you liked the hub and hopefully it will be very helpful for you. Thank you for the votes and shares ♥ (I absolutely love your profile name!)

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 4 years ago from Florida

      I was in the process of finding a subject for a Hub. I thought of cooking oils, but there is no way I could write a Hub with more info than this one! I had done some research on cooking oils myself, but this Hub is so informative, I'll choose something else.

      Voted UP and will share.

    • JoanCA profile image

      JoanCA 4 years ago

      I always use olive oil or canola oil for cooking. I mainly eat vegetables, so I tend to fry them at lower temperatures. I've heard about the dangers of letting oil get too hot, so I hope lower temps make the oil safer to eat.

    • Careermommy profile image

      Tirralan Watkins 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

      Wow, this one of the most thorough and informative hubs I've read! I've learned so much from this read. Great article. Definitely pinning and sharing this.

    • xstatic profile image

      Jim Higgins 4 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      Great info and well presented too. We use olive oil a not, the extra virgin from Trader Joe's is good, but like to use what Lynne Rossetto Kasper of Splendid Table fame calls "good tasting olive oil" for salad dressings. I am doing a lot of the cooking these days, so this hub is quite helpful.

    • Suzie HQ profile image

      Suzanne Ridgeway 4 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Hi Lisa,

      What a great article and well explained. Love the chart info you have supplied too, makes for easy comparisons and uses. I love oils for homemade beauty products and have used many of these you have mentioned so even more benefits of using up oils you don't use much of in cooking. Love this so votes, sharing and pinned!

    • Gypsy48 profile image

      Gypsy48 4 years ago

      Very detailed hub, I learned a few things about oils, I just have canola and olive oil in the pantry. I will be trying a few others on your chart. Thanks for sharing, voted up.

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Mary.. WOW.. what a compliment! Thank you for your wonderful comment, votes and shares. I'm pleased you find this hub informative. It's always nice to hear that the subject we write about can be useful for others. You are such a wonderful writer yourself, I have no doubt you will find a great subject to flourish your talent with! ♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Hi Joan. I love cooking with olive oil as well, and you are correct to keep the temperature low when using oils like olive oil. Another thing that I know some people with do is save their oil and reuse it, I will not do that because the high heat used will break down the oil nutrients. I certainly appreciate your comment! ♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Thank you for your wonderful comment Careermommy. I'm so happy that you find this hub useful. I certainly appreciate the sharing and pinning. Mahalo nui♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      xstatic, I LOVE Tafer Joe's extra virgin olive oil. I have never heard of Lynne Rossetto's. Is it a national brand or only found in certain areas? I would love to find it and try it as well. I'm happy you find my hub useful. Thank you so much for your comment! ♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Hey Suzie! Good to see you again! Thank you so much for your great comment! I'm happy you find this hub useful. I too, like yourself use oils for some homemade beauty products for my skin. Love coconut oil for making my skin soft. So happy you stopped by. Mahalo nui for the votes, sharing and pinning!♥

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Hi Gypsy48! Canola and Olive oil are pretty much the two basic oils that are needed in one's pantry to make any give dish or dressing. But, I agree with you, I think you should venture out and try different oils and find your favorites. There are so many oils available and I only touched on a few. I'd be interested to know what other oils you have tried and if you found a favorite. Perhaps start with grapeseed oil, peanut oil, or sesame oil if you like to do a little Chinese cooking! Mahalo for your votes and sharing!♥

    • xstatic profile image

      Jim Higgins 4 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      That "good tasting olive oil" is just a recommendation she makes generically. The TJ California Estate Extra Virgin Olive Oil comes in a tall bottle and won a consumer taste test, along with one sold at Costco. We use it for salad dressings. I love to listen to Splendid Table and America's Test Kitchen as well.

    • Rusticliving profile image
      Author

      Elizabeth Rayen 4 years ago from California

      Fabulous xstatic. I certainly appreciate that information. I shop at Costco, so will search it out the next time I go!♥

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