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How to make Venison Jerky

Updated on March 24, 2012
Thin sliced jerky
Thin sliced jerky
Wet Marinade
Wet Marinade
Chimeny fire starter
Chimeny fire starter
Jerky on the grill that was just lit
Jerky on the grill that was just lit
The temp produced from 8 charcoals
The temp produced from 8 charcoals
The finished product
The finished product

Now that deer season is over; what are you going to do with all the venison you’ve stocked piled in the freezer? The answer for me has always been Jerky. Venison Jerky is one of those snacks that once you start eating it you just can’t stop. High in protein and low in fat, Venison Jerky is definitely a healthy choice.

To get started take the desired cuts of meat out of the freezer and let stand until almost thawed. Having the meat partially frozen makes it easier to butcher. Cut your venison in long thin strips like you would carve a London broil. It’s important to trim any fat and sinew; both will not taste good and will spoil in a short time. Once you have all the venison sliced you can add your dry rub seasoning. If you don’t have a dry rub of your own the local market carries a number of different rubs. Dry rub will not only flavor the meat but will help with the curing process. Let the meat sit in the fridge for at least 12 hours. After the meat sits for the allotted time you’re ready for the wet marinade. My favorite marinade consists of equal parts of Soy, Worcestershire, bourbon, and two tablespoons of Turbinado sugar. Turbinado sugar is better known as “barbecue sugar” because it tends to not caramelize like brown sugar. Make sure your batch of marinade is enough to cover all the meat. The venison needs to marinate for at least 12 more hours.

The next step is setting up the grill. The grill that I use allows for the charcoal to burn in the middle of the grill and has a built in fire starter. I simply place the charcoal in the middle and light up the paper sitting in the bottom of the starter. Before I light the charcoal I put all the meat on the grill. If you don’t have a grill like mine simply put the charcoal on one side of the grill and the meat on the other. You don’t want the venison too close to the live fire as it will cook instead of drying out. Make sure you are able to add more charcoal without having to disturb your venison.

Now the tricky part, how to get the grill to the proper temperature? I have found that eight charcoal briquettes will equate to approximately 170-180 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes to an hour pending on the outside temperature. Getting the grill up to 170-180 will kill most bacteria. If your grill doesn’t have a built-in fire starter you will need a chimney to get the coals going. I would suggest lighting four coals in the chimney and adding them to four unlit coals already placed in the grill. This way the temperature will gradually raise and will have a better effect on the jerky.

The venison needs to stay on the grill for about six to seven hours. It should be pliable and completely dried out before you take it off. It has been my experience that you should let the jerky sit overnight before indulging on your cache. This allows for the jerky to rest and it really enhances the flavor, when you take the lid off of it the next day you’ll smell what I’m talking about, enjoy

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    • profile image

      Meist 5 years ago

      Great recipe, and an even better chef!!

    • superquaildog profile image
      Author

      superquaildog 5 years ago

      Thanks, Glad you enjoyed it..

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 5 years ago from America

      My family loves vension jerky. Good hub and information for making it.