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Pan De Yuca - Cheese Bread

Updated on August 31, 2014

What is Yuca?

The Yuca plant is a small hardy plant with long roots. Also called cassava and manioc, it was originally native to South America and has become the third largest crop for carbohydrates in the world. The main sources today are Nigeria, Thailand and Brazil. The starch is extracted from the roots and processed into flour. The flour is also called tapioca flour.

It can grow in poor quality soil and can be harvested in just ten months.

Yuca bread has a thin crust with a soft interior. The flour has a high capacity to absorb liquid making it soft and chewy.


Spanish for Bread of Yuca

I was recently introduced to this delicious cheesy bread and was intrigued as to its origins. The recipe I was taught was traditionally Ecuadorian, but where did the recipe originate?

A literal translation, bread of Yuca is a popular snack found in Brazil, Colombia and Ecuador. It is small baked cheese flavored roll, made either in a small ball or crescent shape. It has a variety of different names depending on the variations in the ingredients used and country of origin.

The chewy, moist bread, best eaten warm, is suitable for any meal and a perfect snack food. Although it has a variety of names, it has cheese and yuca flour as it's main ingredients.


Pan de Yuca

Source

Origins of Pan De Yuca

The origins of the recipe for Pan de Yuca is debated. One thought is that a non cheese bread was made in the Guarani region for as long as humans were living there. Colonists brought cattle, chicken and their products such as cheese and eggs. The recipe then evolved to the modern one used today.

It is known that the plant and the bread were introduced to Africa by Portuguese traders during the 16th century. The plant now being the continents most important food source.

Ingredients
1/2 cup yuca flour
1/2 lb. shredded mozzerella cheese
1/2 teaspoon of baking powder
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
salt ot taste
water to moisten dough if necessary
1 egg
Method
Preheat oven to 375F
Grease baking tray
In a mixing bowl, combine the yuca flour, cheese, egg,baking powder and salt.
Knead the dough until it is completely mixed. if the dough is dry and crumbles, add a tablespoon of water at a time unitl the dough holds together.
Separate the dough into approximately ten equal parts. Shape each part into a ball.
Place the dough about 2 inches apart on the greased baking pan.
Bake for 20 minutes. The bread should be golden when ready.
Serve warm.

Dough rolled into balls

Source

Variations of Cheese Bread

Name
Country
Variation
Pan De Yuca
Columbia/Equador
cassava starch andcheese.
Pao de Queijo/chipa/chipacito
Portugal
cassava starch, milk, cheese eggs and butter. Dough is usually formed int ohorseshoe shapes or rings.
Cunape
Bolivia
chipa -same ingredients as chipa but in a different proportions. Pao de Queijo is formed into small balls, 3-5 centimeters in diameter
pan de bono
Columbia
corn flour, cassava starch,cheese and eggs.

Paraguay and Northeastern Argentina

There are many variations of cheese bread sold in these regions. Chipa guasu made with corn flour, chipa moboca cooked around a stick, chipa soo filed with ground meat. Chipa manduvi made with a mix of corn flour and peanut and chipa avati made from the seed of corn like whole wheat bread.

Brazil

Pao de Queijo is a popular breakfast dish. Modern shoppers can buy bread mixes, ready made and frozen pao de Queijo.Vendors can also be found in places such as train stations and popular areas selling Pao de Queijo

Commercial for shop bought pan de yuca that can be baked at home

Colombia/Ecuador

Pan de Yuca is made of cheese and yuca starch and is typical of southern Colombia and the Coast Region of Ecuador.

Traditionally it is served with hot chocolate, fruit juice or yogurt.

Japan/East Asia

The recipe for Pao de Queijo first appeared with the migration of ethnic Japanese people to Japan from Latin America. Rice flour is substituted for cassava flour.

Pan De yuca

Source

Whatever variation of ingredients used, this gluten free bread is very moist due to the starch havying the capacity to absorb water. It is best enjoyed warm straight from the oven, with a warm drink.

© 2014 Ruthbro

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