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Pastrami, How to Make Homemade Beef Brisket in Juniper Brine

Updated on August 30, 2017

The Perfect Pastrami Sandwich

Not much on Earth is better than a pastrami sandwich on rye, with a little spicy mustard or sauerkraut.
Not much on Earth is better than a pastrami sandwich on rye, with a little spicy mustard or sauerkraut. | Source

Mincing Garlic the Easy Way

Use a food processor to process the garlic to just about this size - far easier than mincing by knife, especially when you're using a lot!
Use a food processor to process the garlic to just about this size - far easier than mincing by knife, especially when you're using a lot!

I've been lucky enough to travel quite a bit, and one of my favorite places on Earth is New York City. It was there that I discovered wood-fired pizza, creme brulee, and the Jewish Deli. Enraptured, I tried repeatedly to capture the flavors I found in the delicatessens - and couldn't! Woe! Disaster! For years I simply remembered the intense flavors and avoided the pale imitations so as not to cloud the memories.

Then I stumbled across an antique cookbook with a large section on brining and preserving meats. I was, of course, familiar with the preservation methods used in my Appalachian South - mainly salting, smoking and canning. Pickling meats I had heard of - but the information had never really percolated. I realized that pickled meats would include the two pinnacles of delicatessen Heaven - Corned Beef and Pastrami. I tried corned beef first - with amazing success. It was so easy! Make a brine, submerge a hunk of cow, turn it once a day and there was lusciousness after a week! I immediately worked out the critical flavors I wanted in Pastrami - with black pepper and juniper at the forefront, but with more to highlight and emphasize.

Just like when I made the corned beef, I couldn't believe the simplicity of the method. The difference with the pastrami was that I smoked it then roasted it before slicing. The flavor was amazing. Several batches later I've happily tweaked my method, and I'm ready to share it. Take a few minutes to put this together - you'll love me for it. Get ready to have the best pastrami sandwich (outside New York City) you've ever had in your life.

Best Buy on Beef Brisket

If you have a freezer, and can take a little time for prep, warehouse clubs are by far the most economical way to buy beef brisket. Supermarkets charge upwards of $7-8 per pound, while in bulk they can come in around $5 per pound. They also tend to be larger in bulk, running about 8-10 pounds each. Buy a case of beef briskets, cut them to suit your needs, wrap them and freeze. You'll save a ton of money.

Homemade Pastrami and Corned Beef Containers

I have really large glass jars which I use to brine the beef brisket for making homemade pastrami and corned beef. They hold 2 gallons - which is huge. I suggest if you find you like making these deli meats yourself, go ahead and invest in one. They aren't that expensive, and they are non-reactive - they won't pick up or add to the flavors of the foods they hold. You can even throw them in the dishwasher if your dishwasher is large enough, making them easy to clean and sterilize between uses. I also like that it's easy to see the food inside - I like knowing what I have in there! Beside, you get to feel kinda like a mad scientist.

Homemade brine ready to go!

Stick your brine ingredients in glass or plastic container and steep them for an hour or so - just like tea.
Stick your brine ingredients in glass or plastic container and steep them for an hour or so - just like tea.

Beef Brisket in the Brine

Brining a whole beef brisket for several days is the key to the incredible flavor of good, delectable, tender pastrami.
Brining a whole beef brisket for several days is the key to the incredible flavor of good, delectable, tender pastrami.

The whole brisket - ready to slice!

Brined, smoked and roasted - the aroma is heavenly.
Brined, smoked and roasted - the aroma is heavenly.

Thinly Sliced Pastrami - Ready for the Perfect Sandwich

Slice very thinly, across the grain, and pile it high on toasted bread.
Slice very thinly, across the grain, and pile it high on toasted bread.

Perfect Pastrami - The Best Pastrami Sandwich

An ultimate pastrami sandwich - a little mustard, a little provolone, on toasted whole wheat.
An ultimate pastrami sandwich - a little mustard, a little provolone, on toasted whole wheat.

Homemade Pastrami - Recipe Ingredients

Ingredients - You'll Need:

  • 2 tablespoons black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 6 bay leaves, crumbled
  • 2 teaspoons whole cloves
  • 1/4 cup minced garlic
  • 2 teaspoons whole juniper berries
  • 16 cups (or 4 quarts) water
  • 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup kosher salt
  • 1 beef brisket (about 4 to 5 pounds)

To Finish the brisket:

  • 1 2/3 cup coarsely ground black pepper
  • 2/3 cup crushed juniper berries

Homemade Pastrami - Directions

Directions

  1. Find a quart jar or mixing bowl, and combine the peppercorns, thyme, bay leaves, cloves, garlic and whole juniper berries. I use a food processor to go the garlic work for me.
  2. In a medium saucepan, combine water, salt and brown sugar. Turn heat to medium, and heat just until salt and sugar dissolves. Remove from heat. Pour salt/sugar mixture over the spice mixture, and allow it to steep for about an hour or so.
  3. Meanwhile, trim brisket. Place in a large, clean container. Once the 'spice tea' has steeped, pour it over the beef. Add just enough ice or very cold water to completely submerge the beef completely. Cover it. Stash the whole thing in the fridge - you want a temperature no higher than 38F.
  4. Every few days, turn the brisket and stir the brine. Allow the brisket to brine for at least one week. I've read it can go for 3 weeks - but I've never waited that long.
  5. After a week, remove the brisket from the brine and rinse well in cold water. Pat it dry. Discard the brine - but get your container ready for another batch. You're going to want it.
  6. Preheat a smoker or grill with a smoking packet to 200-225F. In a bowl or food processor, process together the black peppercorns and juniper berries. I like mine heavily seasoned, and this does it. Use less for a lighter flavor. Rub the pepper/juniper mixture evenly over both sides of the brined brisket.
  7. Smoke the brisket over low heat for at least an hour, but no more than two. Remove from the smoker. Preheat oven to 350F.
  8. Place the brisket on a broiler pan over a deep sided baking sheet. Pour several cups of hot water into the baking sheet. Carefully put the whole thing in the oven.
  9. Roast for an hour to an hour and a half (for a large brisket). I usually start sneaking little tastes at this point.
  10. Allow the brisket to rest for at least half an hour before slicing. Slice the pastrami very, very thinly across the grain.

You can serve this however you like - the ultimate pastrami sandwich for me has simply whole grain mustard and wheat or rye bread and is grilled off. I also like it snuck out of the fridge in bites. Mmmmm. Good stuff.

Almost identical in method - watch how to make homemade corned beef...

What's your favorite?

Which do you prefer?

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© 2010 Jan Charles

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    • DixieMockingbird profile image
      Author

      Jan Charles 5 years ago from East Tennessee

      There are several dishes known by that name, but the one I think you mean is a cornmeal mush with the neckbones simmered in for flavor. Here in the Southern Appalachians it was quite common.

    • profile image

      lw wolf 5 years ago

      what is a poor man breakfast? They tell me it is made from cornmill and pork neck bones.