ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Lord of Sipan, Moche ruins and the King Kong dessert in Peru!

Updated on March 25, 2016

Royal Tombs Museum of Sipan

Historical past

Lambayeque is a region in northwestern Peru that is well known because of its rich Chimú and Moche pre-Inca past and also because it houses the Royal Tombs Museum of Sipán. The Lord of Sipán (El señor de Sipán) is a mummy found in Sipán by Peruvian archaeologist Walter Avila in 1987. The museum houses most of the important findings of Dr. Alva in 1987 and was inaugurated in 2002. The museum is located in the town of Lambayeque and looks similar to the ancient Moche tombs.

Some archaeologists consider this tomb to be one of the most important archaeological discoveries in this part of the world in the last 30 years, because the main tomb was found intact and untouched by thieves.

The Lord of Sipán video

The Lord of Sipán is an interesting video with many pictures from archeological sites and museums, but unfortunately it is only in Spanish.

To compensate I am also including a link to an excellent multimedia presentation, in six languages, about Peru and it includes sections on archeological heritage, nature & landscape, festivities & traditions and cuisine. 


A piece of King Kong for afternoon tea
A piece of King Kong for afternoon tea

King Kong, a sweet from northern Peru

I have already writen a couple of hubs about sweets: the first one was the Kiss-wrapped sweets from Kuranda, in Queensland, Australia; the second was about Tejas, which come from southern Peru and now I will write about a sweet, with the unlikely name of King Kong and it comes from the northern Peruvian region of Lambayeque.

King Kong is a typical Peruvian sweet and it consists of four sandwich-like layers of sweet biscuit (flour, butter, egg yolks and milk) filled with three layers of manjar blanco (sweet, creamy filling made with milk and sugar); pineapple jam, and a sweet peanut paste, which is placed between the layers of biscuits. The block of sweet is then sliced and the fillings have three different colors, texture and flavor! The dish was first created in the 1920’s by Victoria Mejía and it was originally intended as a snack for the men working in the sugar cane and cotton plantations. 

Poster from the original King Kong 1930s film.
Poster from the original King Kong 1930s film.

Origin of the name

The sweet received its unique name due to the popularity of the movie King Kong. In the 1930’s that famous movie was being shown in the city and legend has it that citizens liked to compare the shape and size of the local sweet with the figure of the big gorilla on the movie screen, so the sweet was baptised with the name of the gorilla!

Today the Mejia family still makes the best sweet, which sells under the brand name San Roque. The popularity of the sweet is growing beyond the Peruvian borders and it is now being exported abroad and their factory is being refitted to cope with the increased demand. Please watch the video on the right, which shows the San Roque factory and the different stages of the King Kong production.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • sylvia13 profile imageAUTHOR

      Sylvia Gadea de Beer 

      8 years ago from Shoal Bay, NSW, Australia

      I had to laugh with your use of the word gross, but how true that is! They were not dainty at all, that is true, but the manjarblanco (caramel) sure was "delicioso"!

    • profile image

      Colin 

      8 years ago

      The galletas were gross but the caramel was DELICIOUS!!!!!!!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)