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Quick and Easy Gluten-Free Pizza Crust

Updated on January 8, 2014
Quick and Easy Gluten-Free Pizza
Quick and Easy Gluten-Free Pizza | Source
5 stars from 1 rating of Gluten-Free Pizza Crust

Our family loves pizza! We could eat it every evening if it made sense, especially when it's cold. But if you have special dietary needs, this may be harder than simply ordering out for delivery from Dominoes or Pizza Hut.

Many places don't offer a gluten-free alternative to their pizza crusts, and if they do, they aren't very tasty.

Many of these end up being dry, crumbly, tasteless, or all of the above. So then you try making them yourself at home.

Many people don't have the time, between work, the house, and the kids to make dinner for their families at night.

But with all of the different flour and recipe options, knowing when to use eggs, when to use xanthan gum, and how to find all the right ingredients in their gluten-free forms may be too much to handle.

Well, I want to simplify this process for you as much as possible and provide you with a recipe that will take you only minutes using the ingredients you already have in your pantry. Let's begin with my flour choices.

Benefits of This Flour Blend

Almond flour is my favorite gluten-free flour to use in all of my recipes because of it's amazing nutty flavor, wheat-like consistency, sheer nutritional value, and easy substitution for all-purpose flour.

Almond flour is a little bit more expensive, but if you purchase it online it is generally la lot less expensive than it would be were you to purchase it at a health food store, even including shipping.

And it's so packed with protein and flavor that it's worth the cost to me. Another of my favorites is tapioca flour (or tapioca starch), and many of these recipes need at least 30% starch in the flour blend.

Because tapioca flour is a natural thickener it adds chewiness to all of my bread recipes. It also has a neutral taste and therefore will not change the flavor, color or texture of any of my dishes.

The first time I used tapioca starch to cook, I was amazed to have a crisp to my breads that helped to hold them together, even with no protein.

Finally, coconut flour, being the flour I most often switch out with almond flour in many of my recipes, is my other favorite basic gluten-free flour.

For those individuals that are worried about carbs in their diets, like most women trying to lose a little weight, coconut is naturally low in digestible carbohydrate.

It contains no gluten, is cheaper than most other nut flours, is loaded with health promoting fiber, protein, and other important nutrients, and it tastes terrific. It contains more protein than enriched white flour, rye flour, or cornmeal and about as much as whole wheat flour.

Especially if I don't have enough almond flour left and need to get back to the store, am trying to create something lighter on my diet, or don't have quite as much money to spend one month, coconut flour is wonderful.

Other Important Things to Know

One thing to pay attention to is that the moisture level in any recipe may need to be adjusted depending on the type flour you use in your recipe.

Almond flour does not absorb much liquid so you'll have to be careful about your use of liquids with this one. And coconut flour absorbs a good deal of liquid, so you'll likely need to use a tad bit more than expected in your recipe with this one. But that is something you can simply adjust in the midst of mixing your batter.

Another important feature about gluten-free flours is that you'll usually need a substance called xanthan gum. Without gluten to fluff up your breads, help them to hold their shape and hold them together, you'll need something to do this job for you. That's xantham gum!

Keep in mind however that many of your gluten-free flours will already contain this substance and so there'll be no need for you to add more to your recipes.

Gluten-Free Pizza Crust Ingredients
Gluten-Free Pizza Crust Ingredients | Source
Step One: Mixing dry ingredients
Step One: Mixing dry ingredients | Source
Step Two: Mixing in wet ingredients
Step Two: Mixing in wet ingredients | Source
Step Three: Knead and roll out your dough
Step Three: Knead and roll out your dough
Step Four: Fold your dough to transfer it to your pizza pan and transfer
Step Four: Fold your dough to transfer it to your pizza pan and transfer | Source
Step Five: Lay out the dough on the pan and fold in the edges
Step Five: Lay out the dough on the pan and fold in the edges | Source

Cook Time

Prep time: 15 min
Cook time: 6 min
Ready in: 21 min
Yields: 1 pizza with about 8 slices

Ingredients

  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 1 cup tapioca flour
  • 1 cup coconut flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder, (make sure it's gluten-free)
  • 2 teaspoons xanthan gum, (only if your flours do not already contain it)
  • 1 (0.25 oz) package active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar, (make sure it's packaged in a gluten-free environment)
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees F and prepare your pizza pie pan by spraying it generously with cooking spray.
  2. In a small bowl, with your cup of warm water (yes, the water must be warm), dissolve your yeast and let sit for about 10 minutes, until it turns creamy.
  3. In a large bowl, combine your 3 cups of various flours and mix to combine.
  4. Then add in your xanthan gum, olive oil and salt. Mix well.
  5. At the end of 10 minutes, add your brown sugar to your yeast solution and dissolve completely.
  6. Add this to your dough mixture and knead in well in your bowl.
  7. Turn your dough out onto a surfaced lightly dusted with cornmeal or one of your flours.
  8. Knead for approximately 10 minutes to thoroughly combine your ingredients and create a well mixed pizza dough.
  9. If you would like, and some do, place your dough back into your bowl, cover it with a damp towel, and let it rise for about 30 minutes.
  10. Dump it back out onto your dusted surface and roll it out flat.
  11. It's going to have some stretchy qualities to it, so you may have to hand stretch it in order to get it to the size of your pizza pan.
  12. If desired, you may even fold over the edges of your dough do that your pizza has an edge you can hold while eating your pizza.
  13. Even better, roll your pizza crust extra big and fold the edges over cheese sticks. This will give you a delicious stuffed crust!
  14. Now you'll want to pop it into the oven for about 6 minutes before topping it.
  15. This will give your crust it's crispy texture that will give your pizza something solid to top that won't fold over when you eat it. It will also ensure that it gets fully cooked in the middle and doesn't stay wet and sticky through cooking.
  16. It will likely balloon up and brown in the oven. This is normal.
  17. However, when you take it out of the oven, you will want to immediately cover it with a towel and smash it back down flat before it sets, so you can have a normal looking pizza.
  18. Now lower the temperature of the oven to 400 degrees F and top your pizza with your chosen sauce and your favorite toppings.
  19. I suggest my Homemade Tomato Sauce, a nice alfredo, or a pesto sauce for the best results, I did a half and half on mine because my husband loves bbq chicken pizza.
  20. Now you can pop it back into the oven and bake for about 12 minutes to have a crispy, crunchy, delicious gluten-free pizza for your family.
  21. Yummy! Yummy! This crust actually tastes good all by itself.
Step Six: Precook your pizza crust in the oven and sauce it as you choose, Step Seven: Top your pizza
Step Six: Precook your pizza crust in the oven and sauce it as you choose, Step Seven: Top your pizza | Source
Step Eight: Cook your pizza and enjoy!
Step Eight: Cook your pizza and enjoy! | Source

Nutritional Information

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1 slice of pizza
Calories 104
Calories from Fat9
% Daily Value *
Fat 1 g2%
Carbohydrates 21 g7%
Sugar 3 g
Fiber 1 g4%
Protein 1 g2%
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 194 mg8%
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.
The Sign of Good Food!
The Sign of Good Food! | Source

Although both almond flour and coconut flour contain a great deal of protein themselves, many people like to add eggs to their recipes for extra protein and to help hold their breads together.

It's not necessary, but it really comes down to personal preference.

I really think you're going to enjoy this pizza crust! We had pizza for dinner last night, hence the pictures you see above, and I can still remember the fluffy, chewy goodness that was our pizza last night.

It was thick and strong enough to hold up all of our amazing pizza toppings, but good enough to eat all by itself.

I would love to know how this same recipe turns out for all of you, and how you liked it! Please feel free to also suggest other gluten-free recipes that you would like to see!

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© 2013 Victoria Van Ness

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    • VVanNess profile image
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      Victoria Van Ness 3 years ago from Prescott Valley

      Wendy, The specific yeast that you use, and letting it dissolve in warm water on the side for ten minutes before mixing it in, make all the difference in this recipe.

      This is one of those dough recipes that you have to force to do what you want, lol. It actually doesn't stretch that easily, and you may have to add more water or flour to get it to the size you want while rolling it. I make this crust all the time and it turns out slightly different each time.

      But every time, it's super easy and quick to make and even better to eat. My husband likes me to roll it out thinner, which is more difficult, but I personally like it thicker. I'm totally a dipper when it comes to my pizza crusts. Good luck. Some practice should make this one perfect for you! Don't give up.

    • profile image

      Wendy 3 years ago

      The pictures for this pizza looks like a wheat pizza not gluten free pizza, normally a non gluten pizza doesn't stretch like that.

    • profile image

      Wendy 3 years ago

      Hi I just tried this recipe and it doesn't stretch at all it is very crumbly and difficult to roll, I looked at your pictures and is not like that at all, I did everything you said, the only thing I noticed I did different was the Yeast I used quick-rise gluten free Yeast (instant dry) I thought it was the same thing just that this one rises faster.

      Your advise will be greatly appreciated.

      Thank you

    • VVanNess profile image
      Author

      Victoria Van Ness 3 years ago from Prescott Valley

      Nice!! I'm glad you liked it. :) Thanks for the comments.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Great ideas! You're helping me to build up my gluten free recipes. We have a market here that delivers if one is in the area, like I am. It is especially helpful, since I would rather have camera equipment than a car. That means that it saves me time, and I'm still getting quality food.

    • VVanNess profile image
      Author

      Victoria Van Ness 3 years ago from Prescott Valley

      Well, just use wheat or all-purpose flour in place of the gluten-free flours, and eliminate the xanthan gum and you've got yourself an amazing pancake recipe! :)

      I love how easy it is, once you understand the purpose of gluten in food and how its used, to switch back and forth between gluten-free and glutenated foods. I'm so glad you enjoyed my article!

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I like that you actually wrote an introduction before starting in on the recipe. The recipe itself doesn't interest me because I have no dietary concerns, but the writing does...and you did well. :)