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Stewed Chicken Over Angel Hair Pasta

Updated on October 28, 2015

Stewed Chicken, Gubbian Style

I got the idea for this chicken from a recipe book I have by Mary Ann Esposito. She travels around Italy a lot and gets inspiration from the country sides of Italy. Chicken is a staple if most homes and it's nice to have a different way of making it. It can get boring making the same chicken recipe all the time.

You can make this recipe the day before and the flavors blend in the chicken, making it even better. Of course, I change the recipe a little to suit my needs and the tastes of my family.

So full of flavor this chicken gets browned first then the rest of the ingredients get added. Great juicy sauce is a result of tomatoes and wine added making it perfect for spooning over a plate full of Angel hair pasta. Add a loaf of crusty Italian bread and a glass of your favorite wine and "mangiare hardy." (Meaning eat hearty)

I hope you enjoy my version of stewed chicken, Gubbian style.


Tips

  • When cooking with wine, always use a wine that you like to drink. If you use a wine you don't like, then you won't like the taste of the dish either.
  • Leave the skin on the chicken, it makes it juicier. You can always take the skin off after.
  • You can use fresh tomatoes if you like, but you don't get as much juice for the sauce.
  • The grating cheese is purely optional. If someone in your party doesn't like it, you can always just serve at the table, leaving each person to use it if they wish.

Photos of Stewed Chicken, Gubbian Style, Over Angel Hari Pasta

Ready to eat!
Ready to eat! | Source
Chicken cooking in the pan with all ingredients added.
Chicken cooking in the pan with all ingredients added. | Source
Picture of the ingredients.
Picture of the ingredients. | Source
First  stage of chicken cooking.
First stage of chicken cooking. | Source
Second stage.
Second stage. | Source

Please Vote

5 stars from 3 ratings of Stewed Chicken over Angel Hair Pasta
Prep time: 15 min
Cook time: 1 hour
Ready in: 1 hour 15 min
Yields: This recipe served 2 people
  • 1/8 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/2 large white onion, chopped
  • 4 chicken thighs, with bone and skin
  • 1/8 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed
  • 1/2 cup white wine, of your choice
  • 1/2 large can plum tomatoes, plus the juice
  • to taste salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 to 1/2 lb. Angel Hair pasta
  • To taste grated Pecorino Romano cheese, Optional

Directions

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan and cook the onion over medium heat until soft and translucent. Add the chopped garlic and cook for another minute.
  2. Raise the heat to medium high and add the chicken thighs. Cook until they are well browned on all sides.
  3. Add the wine vinegar and allow it to evaporate. Lower the heat to medium and add the sage and rosemary. Continue to cook for 15 minutes. Raise the temperature again to medium high and add the wine.
  4. Put the tomatoes in a bowl and squeeze them with your hands until they are mashed; you will need half of the juice from the can also. Pour the tomatoes over the chicken and season with salt and pepper and continue to cook for another 20 minutes, unclovered
  5. In the meantime bring the water to a boil and put in the Angel Hair pasta and cook for only about 5 minutes or until desired tenderness. Try to arrange this so the pasta is done when the chicken is done.
  6. Put the pasta on a large platter and arrange the chicken on top and pour all the tomato sauce on top. You can sprinkle with grating cheese, if you like. Serve immediately.

A Little History of Gubbio, Italy

This information I got from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


Gubbio is a town and commune in the far northeastern part of the Italian province of Perugia (Umbira). It is located on the lowest slope of Mt. Ingino, a small mountain of the Apennines.

The city's origins are very ancient. The hills above the town were already occupied in the Bronze age. Gubbio became very powerful in the beginning of the Middle Ages. The town sent 1,000 knights to fight in the First Crusade under the lead of Count Girolamo Gabrielle, and according to an undocumented local tradition, they were the first to penetrate into the Holy Sepulcher when the city was seized in 1099.

Gubbio became part of the Papal States in 1631, when the family della Rovere, to whom the Duchy of Urbino had been granted, was extinguished. In 1860 Gubbio was incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy along with the rest of the Papal States.

The historical centre of Gubbio has a decidedly medieval aspect:" the town is austere in appearance because of the dark grey stone, narrow streets and Gothic architectures. Many houses in central Gubbio date to the 14th and 15th centuries, and were originally the dwellings of wealthy merchants. They often have a second door fronting on the street, usually just a few inches from the main entrance.


Images of Gubbio, Italy

Light streaming through a monastery.
Light streaming through a monastery. | Source
Source
Gubbio at Christmas Time
Gubbio at Christmas Time | Source
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Source
Source

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    • Rachel L Alba profile image
      Author

      Rachel L Alba 20 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Thank you, poetryman, you are a good hub friend. I appreciate it.

      Have a Blessed Christmas.

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 20 months ago

      Chicken seems to be an almost universal food. I have liked almost every way I have had it prepared.

      I liked the photos you included. I shared the hub on Facebook.

    • Rachel L Alba profile image
      Author

      Rachel L Alba 21 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Hi Cornelia, Here in the USA, that's what it's called. It's the very thinnest and cooks in less then 5 minutes. I love to cook foods from other countries and would love to see some of your recipes from Ireland. Thanks for the visit and the vote of confidence.

      Blessings to you.

    • CorneliaMladenova profile image

      Korneliya Yonkova 21 months ago from Cork, Ireland

      I will try it for sure. Looks so tempting and delicious 5 star meal. By the way love that pasta and had no idea that they call it angel hair :)

    • Rachel L Alba profile image
      Author

      Rachel L Alba 21 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Thank you Rabadi, It's much appreciated. Thank you for following also. I will check your hubs out also.

      Have a Blessed Thanksgiving.

    • Rabadi profile image

      21 months ago from New York

      Mmm showing this to my mother :) you got s new follower, follow me for some exciting hubs!

    • Rachel L Alba profile image
      Author

      Rachel L Alba 21 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Thank you Cyndi10. I appreciate your kind comments and encouragement. Thanks for the visit.

      Blessings to you.

    • Rachel L Alba profile image
      Author

      Rachel L Alba 21 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Thank you Cyndi10. I appreciate your kind comments and encouragement. Thanks for the visit.

      Blessings to you.

    • Cyndi10 profile image

      Cynthia B Turner 21 months ago from Georgia

      The dish looks so very good and easy. I like it that you paired it with the great information on Gubbio Italy with such wonderful pictures. This makes you want to travel and eat! Well done.

    • Rachel L Alba profile image
      Author

      Rachel L Alba 21 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Thanks Jackie. lol I'll be looking for that book. I really like seeing your visits and comments. It's encouraging.

      Blessings to you.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 21 months ago from The Beautiful South

      Another great one Rachel! Five stars. This would be perfect for fixing thighs, which is mostly what I can find on sale. Usually I save them for soups or stews but this is sort of a tomato/chicken stew, isn't it? Sound like a real winner. I may have to turn your recipes into a book! lol

    • Rachel L Alba profile image
      Author

      Rachel L Alba 21 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Hi Alicia, I guess that tomato sauce recipe would be good with pork chops too if you like. Thank you for the visit and comments. I appreciate it all.

      Blessings to you.

    • Rachel L Alba profile image
      Author

      Rachel L Alba 21 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Hi Pat, Actually the original recipe said to use all the parts of a chicken. I used the thicken thighs because that's my husband's favorite and it was just for him and me. So, sure, use what ever part of the chicken you want.

      Thanks again, friend, for the visit and comments.

      Blessings to you.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 21 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      I love the combination of tomatoes, cheese and herbs, so I enjoyed reading your recipe. The information about Gubbio is very interesting. Thanks for including it.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 21 months ago from sunny Florida

      Hi Rachel

      Looks like the sauce is yummy..I am not so much on thighs...would breast work in this or would they dry out?

      Thanks

      Angels are on the way ps

      shared and pinned

    • Rachel L Alba profile image
      Author

      Rachel L Alba 21 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Hi Peggy, Thank you so much. I appreciate you visit and great comments.

      Blessings to you.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 21 months ago from Houston, Texas

      I know from reading this recipe that it is a winner! Gave it 5 stars and I'll be making this soon. The information about Gubbio made it extra interesting. Thanks. Pinning this and will give it a share.