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Swedish-Style Pancakes with Loganberry Sauce

Updated on July 10, 2016

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Loganberry plants are similar to blackberry plants, but the berries resemble raspberries.
Loganberry plants are similar to blackberry plants, but the berries resemble raspberries. | Source

Introduction

This recipe is another of my great-aunt's creations. It became her son's favorite breakfast, which he often talked about during his time in Vietnam. Although these are similar to authentic Swedish pancakes, one noticeable difference is the proportion for each ingredient.

According to Mark Bittman at the New York Times, an authentic Swedish pancake "takes the proportions of a standard pancake and skews them, boosting the proportion of eggs, butter and sugar at the expense of flour." Compare his recipe to this one, which uses more flour.

Loganberries are similar to raspberries. They are named for horticulturist James Logan, who discovered them accidentally during an experiment. The Oxford English Dictionary describes the loganberry as "a hybrid of a raspberry and an American dewberry."

Sifting flour keeps recipes from being dry.  In this recipe, sifted flour keeps the pancakes light.   For best results, beat eggs with a wire whisk or a fork.
Sifting flour keeps recipes from being dry. In this recipe, sifted flour keeps the pancakes light. For best results, beat eggs with a wire whisk or a fork. | Source

Cook Time

Cook time: 15 min
Ready in: 15 min
Yields: Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 cups fresh loganberries
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup milk, divided
  • 1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted

Step-by-Step Instructions

  1. Cook 1 cup granulated sugar and loganberries in a saucepan, stirring frequently. Remove from heat once berries start to pop. Set aside.
  2. Beat eggs in a large mixing bowl until light and airy.
  3. In a mixing bowl, sift flour, sugar, and salt.
  4. Add 1/2 cup milk and dry mixture to eggs.
  5. Add cream, butter, and remaining milk. Stir just until combined.
  6. Warm a skillet over medium heat. When a drop of water dances on the skillet, the skillet is ready.
  7. Pour batter by 1/4-cup measures on warm skillet. Cook until golden brown on each side.
  8. Serve with loganberry sauce. Sprinkle some confectioners' sugar over each serving.

Preparing the Pancakes

Things to Remember

According to the Betty Crocker Web site, you should stir pancake batter just until the ingredients are combined. Leave some lumps in. Overmixing the batter produces more gluten and results in tougher pancakes.

Start the video at 1:27 to watch a professional chef prepare the pancakes. Because these pancakes are lighter, it's important to not overcook them. Finished pancakes should be somewhat similar to crepes.

Pancakes should be turned only once; otherwise, they become tough. Pancakes are ready to be turned when edges are dry and bubbles form and pop on the top.

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1/6 recipe
Calories 425
Calories from Fat135
% Daily Value *
Fat 15 g23%
Saturated fat 9 g45%
Unsaturated fat 6 g
Carbohydrates 66 g22%
Sugar 38 g
Fiber 3 g12%
Protein 9 g18%
Cholesterol 135 mg45%
Sodium 254 mg11%
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.

Suggestions and Substitutions

Nutrition information above was based on whole milk, unsalted butter, large eggs, and heavy whipping cream. To reduce the fat and calorie content, try any of these substitutions:

  • Use 1% milk instead of whole milk.
  • Use egg substitute for some of the eggs. (1/4 cup egg substitute = 1 egg)
  • Use light whipping cream instead of heavy whipping cream.
  • To reduce cholesterol, use margarine. The sodium will increase if you do this.
  • To increase fiber, substitute half of the white flour with whole-wheat flour. This may affect the texture, however.

If loganberries are unavailable, use raspberries or blackberries.

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