ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

The Great British Cup of Tea - Fancy A Cuppa?

Updated on March 20, 2012
Source

Great British Cup of Tea



Ever since the 17th Century the British have had a love affair with the quintessential British beverage, tea.

The great British cuppa is the most favoured product on the island and there is not anything else we eat or drink that comes close in popularity. Brits drink 165 million cups of tea a day, that’s a whopping 14 billion litres of tea a year. We love tea for its refreshing taste and believe it or not, its health benefits, which are many.


Tea for Every Occasion

There's Nothing Like A Cup of Tea to Cheer You Up

This is literally true. Brits drink tea for every occasion and believe it can solve anything. No matter what the problem is the Brits always turn to a cuppa to ease the pain. After an argument, a lover’s tiff, an accident, or shock (when you must serve a sweet cup of tea) and even a death, you can hear the Brits say things like ‘put kettle on’ ‘oh, make a brew’ ‘want a cuppa tea love’ ‘She’s had a shock make a sweet cup of tea’ in the hope that it will relieve tensions or give comfort!


Source

Health Benefits of Tea



Did you know that tea contains over 700 natural chemicals including thiamine, which helps us to relax and fluoride which helps prevent tooth decay. It also contains antioxidants that can help in the fight against heart disease, strokes and cancer. It packs a very powerful punch. But all these beneficial properties are locked up in the leaves and are only released when the tea is brewed. Science shows that the length of time taken to brew tea is important and 7 minutes is the optimum amount of time that it should be brewed. For me 7 minutes is way too long,’ that’s stewing tea that smells like old socks!’ Apparently adding milk does not make any difference to the beneficial.

Source

Tea Customs





Afternoon tea is a custom that was created by Anna, 7th Duchess of Bedford in the early 1800's when she started to have tea in the afternoon around 4.p.m. to fill the gap between lunch and dinner. In those days dinner was served quite late compared to today, and 8 o’clock was the norm for serving dinner. Afternoon tea became very fashionable and developed into high tea with little fairy cakes for women in polite society.


How Do You Brew Your Tea?

See results

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • editorsupremo profile imageAUTHOR

      editorsupremo 

      6 years ago from London, England

      Leroy, I do think 'fairy' cakes is a name peculiar to the UK shores.

      I also enjoy reading about different foods from around the world and I am often cooking foods from different cultures. It's great and fortunately my family love to taste foods that are different to our Caribben culture, so I have a ready made bunch of tasters!

      Hold back on the sugar too much is not good for you!

    • Leroyworld profile image

      Leroyworld 

      6 years ago from Texas, No place else

      editorsupremo,

      Thanks. I have always wondered what fairy cakes were. I like reading about different food and drink from around the world. Twinning has a tea blend called "English Breakfast Tea" that I like to drink hot.

      Iced tea will quench thirst unless I overload it with sugar. That is very common bad habit around here.

    • editorsupremo profile imageAUTHOR

      editorsupremo 

      6 years ago from London, England

      Hey Leroy, Regardless of the weather, hot or cold we still drink tea. In fact hot tea is refreshing and actually quenches your thirst. Fairy cakes are like small cup cakes!

    • Leroyworld profile image

      Leroyworld 

      6 years ago from Texas, No place else

      Interesting. Here in Texas, we usually drink iced tea brewed in the sun. It's hot down here. Still, hot tea is catching on.

      Just one question. What are fairy cakes?

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)