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How to Make Tofu for Tofu-Collard Casserole

Updated on January 18, 2016
My luncheon plate has tofu-collard casserole (upper left), steamed sweet peas (upper right), and fresh apple slices (lower center).
My luncheon plate has tofu-collard casserole (upper left), steamed sweet peas (upper right), and fresh apple slices (lower center).

How to Make Tofu

Author's Note: I only made tofu once using vinegar to coagulate the soy milk and then draining the coagulated soy by hanging it in cheesecloth overnight. The result had a texture somewhat like cottage cheese. To get the block form, one must use a press, such as shown in the video.

Source

Collard Greens


The word collard comes from the word colewort or cole which is a Middle English word derived from the Latin caulis, meaning "stalk" or "cabbage." The genus for this loose-leafed plant is Brassica, a term for cruciferous vegetables.


Collard greens and other Brassica contain selenium, a cancer prohibitor, and indole-3-carbinol, a chemical that promotes DNA repair.

Edible Parts of Common Brassica Vegetables

Root
Leaves
Stem
Bud or Flower
Seed
rhutabega
cabbage
kohlrabi
broccoli
mustard
turnip
collard
 
Brussel sprouts
 
 
kale
 
cauliflower
 

Tofu-Collard Casserole

Since becoming vegan, I have thoroughly enjoyed the physical and sensual involvement with meal preparation. Often I create recipes as I go, following my intuition. This particular recipe turned out delicious, and I undoubtedly will continue making it to satisfy my body's protein needs.

Substitutions: White onion may be substituted for a red or yellow variety. The red and yellow onions will give the casserole a stronger flavor.

Parsley may be substituted for cilantro, but cilantro is sweeter and preferred for this recipe.

Fresh herbs are not as concentrated as dried ones. If using fresh herbs, increase the amount by three, e.g. 1 tsp dried = 3 tsp fresh.

Chopped broccoli, arugula, spinach, or chard may be substituted for the collard greens, if you prefer the flavor of one of these over the collards.

Other uses: If you put the ingredients into a good food processor or blender, the pate may be used on crackers or as a sandwich spread. Baking, however, causes the onion oil to sweeten and the flavors to blend. Raw foods provide more vitamins and enzymes. The baked version is nice for cool autumn and winter days.

Here I have pureed the ingredients in a blender, rather than mixing them by hand. At this stage, the recipe works well as a dip or spread.
Here I have pureed the ingredients in a blender, rather than mixing them by hand. At this stage, the recipe works well as a dip or spread.

Cook Time

Prep time: 15 min
Cook time: 35 min
Ready in: 50 min
Yields: Six (6), one-half cup servings

Ingredients

  • 12 oz tofu, extra firm and mashed
  • 1/4 white onion, large, chopped
  • 1 cup collard greens, thawed
  • 2 tsp basil, dried
  • 1 tsp cilantro, dried
  • 1 stalk celery, large, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, small, minced
  • 1/2 tsp marjoram, dried
From left and clockwise: celery stalk, cup of thawed collard greens, parsley (substituted for cilantro), red onion (instead of white), and garlic cloves (needed more with smaller size).
From left and clockwise: celery stalk, cup of thawed collard greens, parsley (substituted for cilantro), red onion (instead of white), and garlic cloves (needed more with smaller size).
The spray oil, dried basil and marjoram, and a garlic press (upper right).
The spray oil, dried basil and marjoram, and a garlic press (upper right).
Setting the oven temperature.
Setting the oven temperature.
The baking dish with spray oil.
The baking dish with spray oil.
  1. Stir ingredients as you add them.
  2. Place in a lightly oiled, medium baking dish with fitted cover.
  3. Preheat oven to 350-degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. Remove cover during last five minutes of baking to allow excess moisture to escape and add a little browning to the tofu.
  5. Allow dish to cool slightly and enjoy.
4 stars from 1 rating of Tofu-Collard Casserole
Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1/2 cup
Calories 54
Calories from Fat27
% Daily Value *
Fat 3 g5%
Carbohydrates 4 g1%
Fiber 9 g36%
Protein 6 g12%
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 26 mg1%
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.

Photo Credit

All non-attributed photos are my own work.

© 2013 Marie Flint

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    • profile image

      TErunhe 3 years ago

      OMG, suddenly I am hurngy! Wow, I never knew greens got that big! My Dad planted some greens and I can't wait for them to come up because I haven't been able to find decent ones at the store.So um, if you guys like can't eat them all or something, just remember I'm here

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 4 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      I suppose that taste is different for each individual, Peachpurple. I myself have eaten left-over tofu dishes the next day after refrigeration and enjoyed them rewarmed. I can't imagine eating left-overs after two days, though, and recommend throwing them out at that point. I may be revising (not the recipe) this hub in the near future. Thank you for the read, trying my recipe, voting, and commenting. I really do appreciate your input!

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 4 years ago from Home Sweet Home

      i am a great fan of tofu. It is healthy and delicious if you cook with the right ingredients. However, you can't eat it the next day if left-overnight. Taste really bad. Yummy recipe. Voted up

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 4 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      Hello, Nellieanna! I'm glad to hear you enjoy greens, the alkalizers of our bloodstream. Eating chlorophyll foods provides us with ample folic acid and trace minerals. The benefits to the brain for acuteness and memory retention by eating raw greens is now known. Although this recipe results in cooked greens, there are still nutritients in it the body can easily use.

      If you substitute fresh collard greens for this recipe, I suggest you use slightly more, maybe an additional 1/4 cup. Be sure the collards are nicely chopped.

      Now that I'm residing in Florida, I will be focusing more on fresh salads to satisfy my appetite.

      Thank you for your comment.

    • Nellieanna profile image

      Nellieanna Hay 4 years ago from TEXAS

      I adore greens, with kale, chard, spinach and collards my most favorite, and I buy them fresh. A night ago, I had an entire bunch of collards, with some salmon, after a fresh salad for my evening meal.

      I like tofu, also. Perhaps I'll get some and try this recipe. I love everything in it! I tend to have my fruits & veggies 'on the hoof' - with little else added to them. For one thing, I cook for one, so that casseroles tend to be more than enough for a meal for me.

      In the case of fruit, as you mentioned in another hub, there's a valid reason they should be eaten in advance of other slower-to-digest foods, to prevent their lingering in the stomach, unable to move on as their nearly-pre-digested state would have them do. Keeping them very long in that organ results in fermentation, and surely results in what many people complain about when eating fruit: - that it is acid & upsets their stomach. Bah! It's so well suited to our digestive systems, it just cruises through, unless we mess with it by serving it in combination with or immediately before other foods; - or by cooking it, which does turn it into the kind of acid that hurts.

      I'm not vegan, but make sure the majority of my diet is.

      Thank you for another delightful hub. Perhaps I will try some tofu soon.

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 4 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      Enjoy your dish, DreamerMeg, and thank you for checking out this recipe.

    • DreamerMeg profile image

      DreamerMeg 5 years ago from Northern Ireland

      I have a box of tofu in my store cupboard. It has sat there for a while because although I wanted to see what it was like, I had never seen a recipe that I fancied trying. I think that box will now get opened. Thank you.

    • grinnin1 profile image

      grinnin1 5 years ago from st louis,mo

      Oh, this sounds very good. I am, or have started, a vegetarian diet since having gallbladder issues . My issue is always getting protein without upsetting my digestive system,, and I have not tried tofu in a baked dish yet. Thanks for the inspiration, and thank you for the constructive criticism on my hubs, much appreciated. Check back later, I've redworked a couple of them.

    working