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Healthy beer bagels!

Updated on April 20, 2014

Healthy beer bagels!

Cast your vote for Beer bagels

Whole wheat , spelt and rye beer bagels

There is just nothing more satisifying then making your own whole wheat beer bagels!
There is just nothing more satisifying then making your own whole wheat beer bagels! | Source
Gathering the ingredients.
Gathering the ingredients. | Source
You, of course, can do all the mixing and kneading by hand but today you use the dough paddle and mixer.
You, of course, can do all the mixing and kneading by hand but today you use the dough paddle and mixer. | Source
A delicious beer to make my beer bagels!
A delicious beer to make my beer bagels! | Source
I like to bench proof my yeast. Just sprinkle your yeast on top of the warm liquid.
I like to bench proof my yeast. Just sprinkle your yeast on top of the warm liquid. | Source
There is no doubt this yeast is active!
There is no doubt this yeast is active! | Source
This is to remind you to scoop the flour out of the bag with a spoon using a light touch. It helps keep you from using too much flour by scooping the measuring cup into the bag. I know it's easier and quicker but your bread will be dry and dense.
This is to remind you to scoop the flour out of the bag with a spoon using a light touch. It helps keep you from using too much flour by scooping the measuring cup into the bag. I know it's easier and quicker but your bread will be dry and dense. | Source
Start the mixing on the lowest setting and start adding flour, a cup at a time.
Start the mixing on the lowest setting and start adding flour, a cup at a time. | Source
If you are tempted to turn the mixer up higher before the flour is wet, you will send flour all over you and your kitchen, so beware!
If you are tempted to turn the mixer up higher before the flour is wet, you will send flour all over you and your kitchen, so beware! | Source
Once all the flour is in the mixer and wet, go ahead and start; turn the mixer up around medium high. Don't go too high or your mixer will "walk" off your counter. That could get expensive!
Once all the flour is in the mixer and wet, go ahead and start; turn the mixer up around medium high. Don't go too high or your mixer will "walk" off your counter. That could get expensive! | Source
I just added the spent grains and turned up the mixer. Let it go for about 8 minutes. Check to see that the dough is not climbing up the hook. If so stop and push it all back in the bowl.
I just added the spent grains and turned up the mixer. Let it go for about 8 minutes. Check to see that the dough is not climbing up the hook. If so stop and push it all back in the bowl. | Source
This is what the dough should look like.
This is what the dough should look like. | Source
Let the dough rise overnight, or, if you don't want to wait, or don't have the time, let it rise to double in size in a warm spot in your kitchen. It could take up to 2 1/2-3 hours. That's another reason to let it rise over night.
Let the dough rise overnight, or, if you don't want to wait, or don't have the time, let it rise to double in size in a warm spot in your kitchen. It could take up to 2 1/2-3 hours. That's another reason to let it rise over night. | Source
It's morning and I am going to let the dough come to room temperature. Letting the dough rise over a day or two can really enhance the flavors!
It's morning and I am going to let the dough come to room temperature. Letting the dough rise over a day or two can really enhance the flavors! | Source
Set up your work area. I like to use a large sil-pat. You want to try and use no flour.
Set up your work area. I like to use a large sil-pat. You want to try and use no flour. | Source
Split the dough in half and set one half aside. Cover the set aside dough with a tea towel to keep it from drying out.
Split the dough in half and set one half aside. Cover the set aside dough with a tea towel to keep it from drying out. | Source
Roll out the dough you are using like a long log, maybe three inches in diameter.
Roll out the dough you are using like a long log, maybe three inches in diameter. | Source
Score the log off in 2 inch chunks and see if they all look even. If so, go ahead and cut them all the way through.
Score the log off in 2 inch chunks and see if they all look even. If so, go ahead and cut them all the way through. | Source
Your cuts should go through and through and each piece should be roughly the same size.
Your cuts should go through and through and each piece should be roughly the same size. | Source
Roll each small chunk out to about 6 or 7 inches long.
Roll each small chunk out to about 6 or 7 inches long. | Source
Take your long "log" and make it into a circle.
Take your long "log" and make it into a circle. | Source
Repeat his process until all the dough is in bagel shapes.
Repeat his process until all the dough is in bagel shapes. | Source
They are now ready for the second rise.
They are now ready for the second rise. | Source
Cover with a clean tea towel and transfer the trays to a warm place in the kitchen.
Cover with a clean tea towel and transfer the trays to a warm place in the kitchen. | Source
Gathering the ingredients for the topping and the barley malt for the boiling water.
Gathering the ingredients for the topping and the barley malt for the boiling water. | Source
When your bagels have risen , you will want to start a large pot of water to boil.
When your bagels have risen , you will want to start a large pot of water to boil. | Source
Once the water is boiling, carefully add your malt and baking soda. The soda, if not added slowly, will create a big mess.
Once the water is boiling, carefully add your malt and baking soda. The soda, if not added slowly, will create a big mess. | Source
Everybody is ready for their dip in the barley malt water!
Everybody is ready for their dip in the barley malt water! | Source
Boil one side for about 20 seconds and gently flip it over. You can press down on one side of the bagel and that should cause it to flip or come apart as in the photo. Don't fret it's just food and the shape won't in anyway affect the flavor.
Boil one side for about 20 seconds and gently flip it over. You can press down on one side of the bagel and that should cause it to flip or come apart as in the photo. Don't fret it's just food and the shape won't in anyway affect the flavor. | Source
I like to sprinkle each one as it comes out of the water. The toppings stick better.
I like to sprinkle each one as it comes out of the water. The toppings stick better. | Source
They are now ready for your hot oven.
They are now ready for your hot oven. | Source
This is the "before the oven" photo.
This is the "before the oven" photo. | Source
This is the "after the oven" photo. I just wish you could smell how fantastic these bagels smell!
This is the "after the oven" photo. I just wish you could smell how fantastic these bagels smell! | Source
I made sauted onion, mushrooms and garlic for this sandwich. I finished the saute off with a little balsamic vinegar.
I made sauted onion, mushrooms and garlic for this sandwich. I finished the saute off with a little balsamic vinegar. | Source
I sprinkled a little bit of Cotija cheese on the mushrooms and added some raw baby kale.
I sprinkled a little bit of Cotija cheese on the mushrooms and added some raw baby kale. | Source
I served these bagels to my most ardent meat eater friend and he loved them! So satisfying and delicious. I, of course drank an Insanity beer with it!
I served these bagels to my most ardent meat eater friend and he loved them! So satisfying and delicious. I, of course drank an Insanity beer with it! | Source

Healthy beer bagels with whole wheat and rye flour

Prep time: 25 min
Cook time: 18 min
Ready in: 43 min
Yields: 1 dozen scrumptious bagels!

Healthy beer bagels

  • 1- 8 ounce beer, stouts and porters work great but, I used a Weyerbacher Insanity
  • 1/2 cup water, I poured out the beer and then added enough water to make 2 cups of liquid
  • 2 tablespoons barley malt syrup (adds flavor but is not necessary for the recipe), add to the water beer mixture and heat to 100F
  • 2 teaspoons yeast, add that to the 2 cups of heated water,barley malt, and beer for bench proofing
  • 2 cups wheat flour
  • 2 cups rye flour
  • 1 cup spelt flour
  • 1 cup bread flour, You can use your own combo of flours or just one type
  • 1 cup vital wheat gluten, The wheat gluten helps this from being too dense of a dough
  • 1/3 cup spent grains, If you don't make your own beer you can skip this or use oatmeal
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt, poaching ingredients,
  • 3 quarts water
  • 1 tablespoon baking soda
  • 2 tablespoons barley malt syrup(again not needed for the recipe), Topping ingredients:
  • 4 tablespoons chia, caraway, sesame seeds, poppy seed or hemp seeds, You can use one of these or any combination to equal 4 tablespoons.

Healthy beer bagels with wheat and rye flour

  1. In a large measuring cup pour off your beer and allow the beer to settle. Add your two tablespoons of barley malt syrup. Bring the total liquid in the measuring cup to two cups by adding water to the beer. I am not a big fan of the microwave but it's a quick way to bring your liguid to about 100F. I then use a cooking thermometer to check the temperature before I add the yeast. If the temperature is good add the yeast and set aside.
  2. Using the big bowl on your mixer, measure out the flours and salt. By this time your yeast should be ready. Please check my photos to see what that should look like. If it's not bubbling, you may have a bad yeast. That's why you bench proof first and don't just throw in your yeast and hope for the best. It would be such a waste of your time and good flour.
  3. Attaching the bread dough hook attachment to your mixer and placing the bowl underneath, snap the paddle down and start your mixer on low. You don't want to send flour all over you and the kitchen. Trust me it's a huge mess. You will want to mix the flour and start pouring in your yeast and barley water. You may need to stop and add the liquid and clean off the sides as you go.
  4. When all the flour is incorporated, turn the mixer up to about medium speed and allow the dough hook to knead the dough. This should take eight to ten minutes. Don't walk away. You want to be there to stop the mixer to push the dough back into the bowl. It has a tendency to ride up the hook. You also want to be there just in case your mixer decides to "dance" off the counter.
  5. Your dough will be slightly tacky. That's a good thing. The wetter the dough, the better the rise. At this point I am going to place the dough in a well-oiled large bowl. I am going to cover and set it in the refrigerator all night. I love the flavor development with an overnight rise. If time doesn't allow you to do that, you can let the dough rise in a warm place in your kitchen. You are looking for the dough to double in size. That can take up to three hours depending on the temperature of your kitchen.
  6. The next morning I am going to take the dough out of the refrigerator and let it come to room temperature. That will take a few hours. No matter what rising method you utilized we can proceed with the recipe at this point.
  7. Take a large baking tray and either use a sil-pat or parchment paper to line the tray. Remove the dough from the bowl and place it on a clean floured working surface. I am then going to roll the dough into a log and portion off 12 equal pieces. You then take each piece and roll it into about a 6 inch log, then make it into a circle. Try to connect the both ends without mashing it together too much to create a nice bagel. Do this step until you have 12 bagels on your tray.
  8. Set the bagels aside in warm area and cover lightly with a tea towel. I lightly flour the underside of the towel so none of the dough sticks. Let the dough rise about an hour. It could take up to two depending on the warmth of your kitchen.
  9. While the dough is rising, turn the oven on to 500F or the highest setting it will go.
  10. Prepare your topping, if you are using any. Check your bagels in about a half an hour and see if they are rising. If they are not, let them go another half an hour. If they are rising well, fill a large pan full of water and start it boiling.
  11. When the water starts boiling add your barley malt and baking soda. Please be very careful and slow with this process. The water will want to boil over. Go slow!
  12. At this point you will carefully drop your bagel in the water. It will take about 15 seconds for it to float on the surface. Take a slotted spoon and push on one side to flip the bagel over and boil another 15 seconds. My pan can do three or four bagels at a time. Transfer the boiled bagel back to the parchment or sil-pat covered tray. Sprinkle with your topping while the bagel is wet. Some recipes call for an egg wash so the toppings stick better but my lazy method works fine. Do this whole procedure for all dozen bagels.
  13. Lower the oven tempurature to 450F and place the tray full of bagels into the oven and bake for 15 to 17 minutes. At the 8 minute mark turn your tray around so the bagels brown evenly. They should be a deep golden brown.. Once browned, remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.
  14. Once the bagels are cool, I slice and freeze them. If I don't, someone I know will eat too many!

Beer bagels with whole wheat and rye flour

The first thing people say when I tell them I make my own bagels is, "Why". My response is always because I can control the ingredients and they are super fun to make. Don't let the length of ingredients (which if you use one type of flour it's not that long) deter you from trying this recipe. It's so fun and rewarding! It really only has one extra step versus making your own bread, so why not? I know that you can go buy bagels, but are they beer bagels with wholesome flours? I haven't found one in a store or bagel shop yet!

I made these bagels for a dinner I hosted with friends who are hard-core meat eaters. I love the challenge in creating a dish that will satisfy them and not have them running to a meat counter on the way home. I served these bagels with carmelized onions which I finished with balsamic vinegar, cojita cheese ( Mexico's version of feta) and baby kale. I also made baked fries. No one left to go to the meat counter! We paired the meal with Weyerbacher's "Insanity" beer. Oh so freaking good!

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