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Quinoa - Plant It and Help Solve World Hunger

Updated on May 21, 2013

Quintessential Quinoa

Quinoa is important to researchers the world over. Why? Because It is a plant that could play a role in alleviating world hunger.

This past summer, in the Okanagan Valley, Canada, I had the pleasure of watching this quintessential super-food, quinoa, grow from a seed, to a tiny plant, to a tall flowering plant, to being harvested.

Just what is quinoa? (Keen-wah)

Quinoa - according to the Dictionary - Quinoa - Chenopodium

Quinoa in bloom.
Quinoa in bloom.

According to Merriam-Webster, this crop, quinoa is primarily pronounced with two syllables with the accent on the first (KEEN-wah). It may also be pronounced with three syllables with the accent on either the first syllable (KEE-noh-a) or on the second (kwi-NOH-a). The pronunciation and spelling varies in other languages.

What is Quinoa? - A weed?

Quinoa in bloom.
Quinoa in bloom.

Quinoa is a leafy herb that grows up to six feet (2 m) tall and produces an abundance of seeds - seeds that serve as a nutritious food. It is an amazingly sturdy plant that thrives even in the harsh climate of the South American altiplano.

In Bolivian, for example, on farm lands that are too rocky to be plowed, quinoa is planted simply by digging holes in the ground with a spear-like instrument and then dropping in the seed. Within months, and with a minimum of care, the quinoa matures. The desert is then set aflame with color - yellow, purple, green, and red.

There are some 17 kinds of quinoa, and often a number of varieties grow together. It is very inexpensive to grow quinoa. One gram of seed will sow 50 feet (15 m) of row. An acre requires about one pound of seed.

The wild relatives of quinoa have long been familiar to North American gardeners and is often called pig weed and also called lamb's-quarters. (Chenopodium album). "Aha," you say, "I have heard of pig weed. In fact, I have some growing in my garden." What you may not know is that pig weed has the amazing ability to flower and go to seed at any stage of its growth. Quinoa retains this ability also. Beets, spinach and swiss chard are also relatives of quinoa.

What makes Quinoa so very special? - Amazing nutritional value.

Quinoa
Quinoa

Quinoa has become highly appreciated for its nutritional value. Unlike other plants, its protein content is very high (12-18%) and contains a balanced set of essential amino acids for humans, making it a complete protein source. High in calcium, magnesium and iron, quinoa is also considered a good source of dietary fiber and phosphorus. Quinoa is gluten-free and easy to digest.

Because of all these characteristics, quinoa is being considered a possible crop in NASA's "Controlled Ecological Life Support System" for long-duration manned spaceflights.

Quinoa may be germinated in its raw form to boost its nutritional value. Germination activates its natural enzymes and multiplies its vitamin content. In fact, quinoa has a notably short germination period: Only 2 - 4 hours resting in a glass of clean water is enough to make it sprout and release gases, as opposed to, e.g., 12 hours with wheat. This process, besides its nutritional enhancements, softens the grains making them suitable to be added to salads and other cold foods.

Another remarkable feature of quinoa is its versatility. Quinoa has a unique, nutty taste. You can use it as a breakfast cereal. You can serve it cold with salad, hot with meat dishes, or sweet as a dessert.

Nutritional Values Compared With Quinoa - Simply amazing!

Quinoa Nutritional Chart
Quinoa Nutritional Chart

You want to make quinoa flour? - Easy!

quinoa growing in Peru
quinoa growing in Peru

I am very frugal, so I cringe at the price of quinoa flour in some supermarkets. All you need is an inexpensive coffee or spice grinder (the kind you pulse - just make sure to clean out the coffee residue!). I love recommending this to people because it is a great way to experiment with quinoa flour without buying an entire package of it.

Here's what you do:

~ Place 1/4 cup (60 mL) of quinoa seeds in the grinder (adding any more will overload the grinder and prevent the seeds from being ground to a fine consistency).

~ Using on/off pulses, process, shaking the grinder every few pulses to ensure an even grind, until the seeds are finely and evenly ground. You can rub it between your fingers - it will be very soft and almost velvety feeling when it is ground all the way. It only takes about 30-45 seconds!

~ Empty the flour into a bowl or measuring cup and repeat with more seeds until you have the desired amount of flour.

NOTE; 1/4 cup (60 mL) of whole quinoa seeds yields about 1/3 cup (75 mL) of fine quinoa flour.

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For those who don't want to make their own flour, but still want better price, there are some GREAT online sources for ordering quinoa flour in bulk. A fantastic online quinoa resource Is Amazon.

A good place to buy Quinoa. - The lowest price.

There are over 120 species of Chenopodium, but only three main varieties are cultivated; one producing very pale seeds, called the white or sweet variety; a dark red fruited variety called red quinoa; and a black quinoa.

As the world becomes more aware of this versatile food there will be more stores offering it for sale. I have been pricing it at our Health Food Stores in the area and we can buy it much cheaper online still. Please check your local stores before you purchase it here.

One thing I must mention is that, like rice, it expands in size when cooked so buy a small amount if you have a small family.

Ready to harvest.
Ready to harvest.

Removal of the saponin.

Before quinoa is ready to eat.

When purchased, the removal of the saponin is usually already done for us.

Removal of the saponin is a process that requires either soaking quinoa in water for a few hours, then changing the water and re-soaking, or rinsing the quinoa in ample running water for several minutes in either a fine strainer or a cheesecloth.

A Few Interesting Facts:

1. Saponin is a bitter-tasting coating that keeps birds at bay until the seeds are very mature.

2. The soapy nature of the compound, saponin, acts as a laxitive.

3. Quinoa sold in packets has usually been washed industrially to remove the bitter husks.

4. Cooking times vary widely according to the variety of quinoa, how it was processed, and the altitude at which it is cooked.

5. Quinoa leaves are eaten as a leaf vegetable, much like Amaranth, but the commercial availability of quinoa greens is currently limited.

6. 1 cup of quinoa when cooked = 4 cups.

NOTE: Deer love the young, tender leaves! A deer fence is in order.

Harvest Time - Late September/Early October

Ready for the harvest.
Ready for the harvest.

After a rain the sun came out. These seeds are ready to burst.

Harvesting is mainly done by hand and rarely by machine because of the extremely variable periods of maturity of native quinoa. An exact timing of harvest is important in order to avoid a high loss of grains due to shattering. However, the exact harvesting time is difficult to determine because panicles of the same plant mature at different times.

The grain yield reaches comparable dimensions to wheat yields. (Often around 3 t/ha up to 5 t/ha.) When the time for harvest arrives, the plants are uprooted, allowed to dry in the sun, and threshed by hand.

Now another remarkable property of quinoa becomes manifest. It can be stored for years without spoiling. Quinoa proves to be a real treasure during long dry seasons. It is easy to see why it is the staple food of people in Bolivia. But of what interest is it to the rest of the world?

Street Children

Street Children
Street Children

A Key to Solving World Hunger?

Famine relief organizations believe that quinoa could play a key role in reducing world hunger. The grain is tough and can be grown in a hostile environment without expensive farming equipment. Through crossbreeding, researchers have already developed exceptionally tough strains of quinoa that are resistant to such adverse conditions as hailstorms and frost. Additionally, it is nutritious and delicious and can be served in a variety of ways.

As to whether quinoa will make a dent in the global hunger problem, only time will tell. In the meantime, you may want to see if you can obtain quinoa locally. With a little imagination and experimentation, you may be able to add to your menu a nutritious dish made of quinoa - the everyday superfood.

Children's Gardens in Peru - Helping to feed 600 hungry children.

*MUST SEE* In the Matara District of Peru more than 70 little gardens are sown, weeded and harvested by school children. Quinoa is one of the seeds planted and valued for its nutritious qualities. The seeds are distributed by the schools in Matara to about 600 boys and girls in other school areas.

Quinoa From Planting to Harvesting - Okanagan Valley, Canada

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The Rough BedsBaby QuinoaDeer FenceQuinoa In BloomQuinoa Ready For HarvestReady For HarvestReady For HarvestHanging To DryQuinoa In DryerQuinoa Ready For Use
The Rough Beds
The Rough Beds
Baby Quinoa
Baby Quinoa
Deer Fence
Deer Fence
Quinoa In Bloom
Quinoa In Bloom
Quinoa Ready For Harvest
Quinoa Ready For Harvest
Ready For Harvest
Ready For Harvest
Ready For Harvest
Ready For Harvest
Hanging To Dry
Hanging To Dry
Quinoa In Dryer
Quinoa In Dryer
Quinoa Ready For Use
Quinoa Ready For Use

Grow Your Own Super Food - All gardens could have a patch.

It only takes a little area to grow enough quinoa for your family.

Best Cookbook - Quinoa 365 - The everyday super food

I have advertised this cookbook in my other Quinoa lenses and it is the one I use. This book truly offers something for everyone, including babies, vegetarians and people living gluten-free.

In "Quinoa 365," sisters Patricia Green and Carolyn Hemming show you how to use this miraculous super food in all your favorite dishes.

Quinoa 365: The Everyday Superfood
Quinoa 365: The Everyday Superfood

Editorial Review:

One of the world's healthiest foods, quinoa contains a perfect balance of all eight essential amino acids, and is a great source of protein, making it an increasingly popular food choice for those looking to incorporate "super foods" into their everyday diets. Gluten-free, wheat-free, and nutrient-packed, quinoa is ideal for those who are health-conscious, vegetarian, and/or physically active, as well as for those with gluten intolerance, wheat allergies, and other digestive disorders. But that's not all: You can eat quinoa guiltless knowing it's free of cholesterol and trans fats.

 

References

*J. G. Vaughn & C. A. Geissler (2009). The new Oxford book of food plants. Oxford University Press

*Greg Schlick and David L. Bubenheim (November 1993). Quinoa: An Emerging "New" Crop with Potential for CELSS (PDF). NASA Technical Paper 3422. NASA

*Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Foods, Catherine Shanahan, MD, Luke Shanahan (2008) pp. 148-151

*All pictures - Family photos.

Find out more facts about quinoa.

The world currently produces enough food for everybody, but many people do not have access to it.

There is ample evidence that rapid progress to reduce hunger can be made by applying a strategy that tackles both the causes and the consequences of extreme poverty and hunger.

1. Interventions to improve food availability and incomes of the poor by enhancing their productive activities.

2. Programs that give the most needy families direct and immediate access to food.

Simultanenously, a global food system needs better governance at national and international level. In food insecure countries, institutions are needed based on the principles of the "Right to Adequate Food." These should promote transparency and accountability, the empowerment of the poor and their participation in the decisions that affect them.

Here are a few more sites you may find interesting!

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You may be on your way to accepting a screenwriter 'Nicholl Fellows Award' some day.

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Have you been eating this delightful, crunchy grain?

Are you now ready to grow a little patch of quinoa for your family?

My family loves it.

Not to get too commercial:

"Mikie" likes it. Why don't you try it, you'll like it.

A Quinoa Lover's Guestbook - Remember, Mikie loves it.

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    • HelloKittyCat profile image

      HelloKittyCat 4 years ago

      Amazing and interesting lens. Quinoa is such a superfood and certainly needs to be better known.

    • Frednun1965 profile image

      Fred Alb 4 years ago from Uruguay

      Interesting information!

      Thinking that this plant Uruguay yard decoration only!

      I am amazed at what I read here!

      Excellent data!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @takkhisa: You are welcome. Thank you for visiting and squidliking this lens.

    • takkhisa profile image

      Takkhis 4 years ago

      This a a great lens and very informative. Thanks a lot for sharing, i am pleased to read this lens.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @tvyps: I love Quinoa, Mikie does too! Now I find that you like it too. Growing it is not hard and it is so beautiful to look at also. As they say, win-win situation.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Kailua-KonaGirl: Thank you so much for visiting and the blessing. I hope that you enjoy Quinoa as much as I do.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @WriterJanis2: I'm so happy that you have read this. I hope that you will try it.

    • tvyps profile image

      Teri Villars 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      Mikie, that is a blast from the past. I eat Quinoa, just never thought about growing it myself. Blessed.

    • Kailua-KonaGirl profile image

      June Parker 4 years ago from New York

      I have always wanted to try quinoa, but haven't gotten around to it yet. I plan to soon though. Another fantastic lens from a lensmaster that really excels increativity. *Squid Angel Blessed*

    • WriterJanis2 profile image

      WriterJanis2 4 years ago

      I wasn't aware of this. Thanks for the introduction.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Frugal-UK LM: It took me a while to remember how to pronounce it too. Thank you for your visit.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @SteveKaye: Thank you, Steve, for your visit. I'm happy that you discovered this amazing food.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 4 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @funbee lm: Thank you for stopping by I hope that you will try some quinoa .. it is good.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Nice to visit this beautiful lens again. I posted it on G+ and and freshened up the blessing with some angel dust. :)

    • Frugal-UK LM profile image

      Frugal-UK LM 4 years ago

      @Mark Shirbroun: Very expensive in the UK when you can find it. Comes and goes in our local supermarket.

    • Frugal-UK LM profile image

      Frugal-UK LM 4 years ago

      We eat Quinoa which we pronounce Kwin- o ah because we can not remember how to really pronounce it but I never though you could grow it yourself. A pretty plant too. I might try this one. thankyou for the info

    • profile image

      SteveKaye 4 years ago

      We have eaten quinoa and it's delicious. There are many ways to prepare it, too. Thank you for publishing this lens. I'm sure many will benefit from having this info.

    • profile image

      funbee lm 4 years ago

      I never knew about this, thank you for sharing such great information!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Thank you, Tipi!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: You are welcome. I hope that you will try this wonderful seed/grain.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Millions are starving because big companies have the govt. in their back pockets.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @YogaAngel: One of the most beautiful I have ever seen!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Most quinoa consumed in the United States is imported from South America. Current estimates of U.S. production are minimal, at less than 10,000 pounds. According to the Food & Agriculture Organization, world production of quinoa in 2010 was 71,419 metric tons on 86,203 hectares. Peru produced 41,079 MT in 2010 on 35,313 hectares followed by Bolivia with 29,500 MT. Denmark is currently producing it on a limited scale.

    • Mark Shirbroun profile image

      Mark Shirbroun 5 years ago

      My dad introduced me to quinoa - it is great stuff! A little expensive at times but I had never thought of growing my own. Thanks for a great lens!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      would there be a European relative ??

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Wow great lens. Thanks a lot, its good to know these plants are out there. It's a real shame Govts prefer Monsanto and GM foods rather than something natural which actually feeds folks.

    • profile image

      SimSpeaks 5 years ago

      Didn't know how useful Quinoa is. Thanks!```

    • YogaAngel profile image

      YogaAngel 5 years ago

      I heart Quinoa! I didn't realize it was such a beautiful plant!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thank you very much for all the information.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: You're welcome. I'm so happy to see you here.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Never knew much about quinoa before... Some great new learning! Thank you!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @rawwwwwws lm: It really is tasty too! Thanks for your visit.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @pawpaw911: Easy to cook, eat and digest! You'll love it!

    • rawwwwwws lm profile image

      rawwwwwws lm 5 years ago

      Wow I never knew quinoa was a super food!

    • profile image

      pawpaw911 5 years ago

      Quinoa does sound like a super food. Thanks for the education.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @SquidooPower: I'm so happy you have discovered this wonderful food! I just made a salad with Quinoa and broccoli the other day. I'll either include it here or make a new lens with it .. soon. It was delicious. Thank you for your comment.

    • SquidooPower profile image

      SquidooPower 5 years ago

      Laraine, you put me onto this wonderful food months ago and we have been eating it since. My wife loves Quinoa salad in particular. Thank you!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Wigscom: I like it too and I'm so happy you stopped by and that you found this lens informative.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @flycatcherrr: It would be great if you can grow a bit to see if it survives. Thank you for visiting me here. I'll be by for a visit soon.

    • Wigscom profile image

      Wigscom 5 years ago

      Really informative lens. I knew I liked quinoa, just didn't realize how little I know about it!

    • flycatcherrr profile image

      flycatcherrr 5 years ago

      I knew that Quinoa is tasty, but I had no idea that it's also so pretty in bloom - or that it's related to lamb's quarters, which is very nice in a spring salad, for we who like to forage in the wild. It would be great fun to grow a bit of Quinoa, if I can find a variety that can cope with a zone 4 maritime climate.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @JoshK47: Thanks for dropping by, commenting and blessing this lens!

    • profile image

      JoshK47 5 years ago

      Quite a wonderful lens here - thanks so much for sharing. Quinoa is a great food item, and can definitely be used to save lives. Thanks for sharing this - blessed by a SquidAngel!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Timewarp: It is so easy. Cooked similar to rice.

    • Timewarp profile image

      Paul 5 years ago from Montreal

      I had quinoa at a friend's house once and it was tasty, need to learn to make it myself soon!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @PBJasen: Thank you for your visit! I hope that you will try some recipes out. I'll be visiting your lenses soon.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @delia-delia: I am so happy that you like quinoa. I think that it is the greatest discovery I've ever made in the food line. One of my friends says that it has solved her stomach problem. She always had a sore tummy after eating. Thank you for your return visit.

    • PBJasen profile image

      PBJasen 5 years ago

      Never heard for Quinoa ! Thanks for such an important information.

    • delia-delia profile image

      Delia 5 years ago

      Laraine Rose you got me hooked on Quinoa, I eat it every day now! love the texture, taste and everything about it..many thanks for this lens...if I could I'd bless it again.... ;-)

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @PNWtravels: Thank you for visiting and blessing this lens. I do love quinoa. I'll be visiting soon.

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @biminibahamas: Thank you for your visit. I appreciate it!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Shades-of-truth: Me too! It is amazing how many of our friends hadn't been introduced to it until we invited them to share a meal with us and served quinoa. Thank you for your visit, Vicki.

    • PNWtravels profile image

      Vicki Green 5 years ago from Wandering the Pacific Northwest USA

      I first discovered quinoa a few years ago when I tried a quinoa dish someone brought to a potluck and I've been hooked ever since. I learned a lot more about this remarkable food from your lens! ~blessed

    • biminibahamas profile image

      biminibahamas 5 years ago

      Terrific lens on this superfood ... thanks for sharing!

    • Shades-of-truth profile image

      Emily Tack 5 years ago from USA

      I have been eating quinoa since the 1970s, and love it. Many members of my family have been introduced to it, from eating it at our table. They love it, and invariably introduce it to others. We LOVE quinoa!

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Johanna Eisler: Sprouted quinoa can be used in salads and sandwiches just like alfalfa sprouts.

      I will add a bit about quinoa Sprouts in my Quinoa Recipe lens. Just for you!

      I'm happy to hear that you are eating quinoa now. Have you tried the pancakes? We have them at least twice a week. They are good cold too!

    • Johanna Eisler profile image

      Johanna Eisler 5 years ago

      We now eat quinoa on a regular basis, and are finding new uses for it all the time. I'm curious, though: You mentioned that it was crunchy. I've always cooked it like rice, and it isn't crunchy at all. Is there some way of using it that retains its crunchiness - something we're missing out on?

    • LaraineRoses profile image
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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: I'm happy that you came to read this. It really is easy to grow and the seeds that escape the harvesting help to feed the birds.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      What a great superfood indeed, everyone and everything can eat it, a lot of third world countries are in warm weather and this seems like a natural plant that would take to this kind of weather conditions. *blessed by a squid angel* for teaching me.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @menskincaretips: You are very fortunate indeed! Thank you for dropping by.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Our daughter had been telling me about it for some time and bringing over samples. I finally tried some recipes. I especially love the pancakes made with quinoa. Usually I get ill if I eat pancakes. These are just so good and I feel great after eating them.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Diana Wenzel: I am so happy that you stopped by to let me know what you thought of it. I find it much easier to digest than wheat, rice and other grains. I am really sold on it. If you can grow it for yourself, even better! Thank you for stopping by.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @dahlia369: This is the first year that we have grown it but I'm sure that we'll grow it from now on. We have fenced off a bit of our back pasture so we have the perfect spot for it. We have it often. There are so many recipes where I substitute it for rice, potatoes or pasta. It is a wonderful seed!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Elyn MacInnis: Do they have amazon in China? Perhaps you can order it? It is very inexpensive because a little goes a long way and it is soooo good for you.

    • menskincaretips profile image

      menskincaretips 5 years ago

      Great information, quinoa is very nutritious and I was lucky my parents fed me this growing up. Thanks for sharing!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I had never even heard of Quinoa before and am amazed at this wonder herb that is nothing but goodness, thank you for sharing your growing experience. This seems to be an excellent part of the solution to world hunger and all of our nutritional issues....blessed!

    • Diana Wenzel profile image

      Renaissance Woman 5 years ago from Colorado

      Stopping back by to enjoy this lens once more. Recently cooked my first quinoa thanks to your encouragement. Definitely ready to grow some of my own. Thanks again!

    • dahlia369 profile image

      dahlia369 5 years ago

      I eat quinoa once in a while but don't grow it. Thank you for all the information and great images - together they make an incredible lens! :)

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image

      Elyn MacInnis 5 years ago from Shanghai, China

      I like quinoa, but they don't sell it in China, and I don't have any dirt to grow it in. Have to eat it when I am home! This is a wonderful lens, thank you so much!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @aesta1: It turned out really well! What fell on the ground wasn't wasted either, the birds fed on it this winter. We left the gate open and deer also nibbled at it.

      Thank you for visiting and your blessing.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @delia-delia: Thank you for the visit and blessing. I appreciate it!

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      Mary Norton 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      We love eating Quinoa so I was interested to know that you can grow it.

    • delia-delia profile image

      Delia 5 years ago

      I support World Vision and believe they also use this for donations..another great lens! What a beautiful plant!

      ~d-artist Squid Angel Blessing~

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @miaponzo: We have Quinoa pancakes for breakfast about 4 times a week. I get really ill from eating pancakes made out of wheat flour. The Quinoa pancakes are filling but not so heavy. Try them, you'll like them. Thank you very much for the visit and blessing!

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      miaponzo 5 years ago

      I have never eaten quinoa before, but now I would like to try :) Blessed!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @ajgodinho: Thank you for dropping by and leavinig a comment and a blessing. This really is a wonderful food and I do hope more people will try it!

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @VisFeminea: Wonderful! I hope that you will pass on the word to others, too.

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      Anthony Godinho 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      This is the first time I'm hearing about Quinoa and I enjoyed learning about it. I'll have to try it for sure. I enjoyed watching the video on the children's gardens in Peru. Well done lens...blessed! :)

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      VisFeminea 5 years ago

      OK I see I didn't know a lot about Quinoa.

      and now I think I'm going to Grow my Own :)

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @teristazko: Thank you for visiting and your kind comments.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @LouisaDembul: Thank you for your visit Mujjen. I love quinoa recipes and will be adding more when I have time.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @anonymous: Thank you for visiting and liking my lens. Please come again.

    • teristazko profile image

      teristazko 5 years ago

      I have never had quinoa before, but it sound like I need to learn about this gorgeous plant. Thank you for sharing this lens...it was extremely informative.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @kathysart: Yes, it is beautiful when in bloom but one wouldn't guess it just by seeing the seeds.

      Thank you for the blessing.

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      LouisaDembul 5 years ago

      This is my first time to see quinoa plants from start to finish, very interesting. It is such an important grain.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I love this beautifully gorgeous lens and fall in love with you.. my dear friend :) Have wonderful times.. always :D

    • kathysart profile image

      kathysart 5 years ago

      I've been eating it for 10+ years now and never knew it was such a beautiful plant. So pretty! Angel blessed lens.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Peta Panos: Thank you for your comment. I'll be by for a visit soon.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @flicker lm: Don't be afraid to plant it. It is only if you plant the seeds from the former crop that you may have a cross with pig weed. Pig weed is quite distinguishable from quinoa too, so there shouldn't be any problem.

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      Peta Panos 5 years ago from Norway

      Fantastic info. I am a great fan of Quinoa

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      flicker lm 5 years ago

      I like quinoa and have even ground it into flour. However, I've hesitated to plant it because I'd heard that it might cross with pigweed, thus the grains could not be used for next year's planting.

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      Mark Falco 5 years ago from Reno, Nevada

      @LaraineRoses: Awesome, my ground could probably do with a break from growing squash all the time so I might just give this a try this year. :)

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @sudokunut: It most certainly would grow in Nevada! Thank you for your visit. I'll be visiting you soon.

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      Mark Falco 5 years ago from Reno, Nevada

      I wonder if it would grow in Nevada. Very interesting lens, thanks for sharing.

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @SayGuddaycom: Thank you for stopping by. I'll be visiting you soon.

    • SayGuddaycom profile image

      SayGuddaycom 5 years ago

      VERY interesting

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @Relative Perspect: Thank you for your visit. I'll be visiting your lenses soon.

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      Relative Perspect 5 years ago

      Superb lens! Thank you, most honorable litterateur! : )

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      Laraine Sims 5 years ago from Lake Country, B.C.

      @NatureLuver: It would be wonderful. I don't hold out much hope for mankind doing it though. There is too much greed, wars and selfishness for it to ever happen. One can only hope though.