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Bok Choy 101 with recipes

Updated on December 8, 2013

How to Cook Bok Choy? Let me count the ways!

Did you know that there are dozens of kinds of Chinese cabbage? It's true. And there are many ways to cook it.

I have some favorites, so in this lens I am going to share all the different kinds of Chinese cabbage, and two recipes. I hope it will be an encouragement to you to try the Chinese cabbage you can find in shops near you.

In China, there are many kinds of "cabbage" and the name may vary from place to place. Maybe you didn't know, but there are 14 language groups and some 2,000 plus dialects in China. That is why we have "Bok Choy" and "Bai Cai" as two names for the same cabbage. (And to confuse you more, you may hear the name Napa, which comes from the Japanese.) On top of that, most of the Chinese cabbages remain unnamed in the US because they have no English name.

The photographs in this webpage are all copyright Elyn MacInnis, If you link the photo back to my web page and give credit, I will be happy to have you use them.

Bok Choy - Bai Cai - Napa - The name means "White Vegetable"

napa bai cai bok choy
napa bai cai bok choy

Well - it is white! And becomes yellow or green at the tips. This beautiful vegetable is a trooper, and lasts through the coldest weather without rotting. And these are all names for the same vegetable, on in Cantonese, one in Mandarin, and one in Japanese.

A Cabbage Story

When we first arrived in China the government provided a certain amount of cabbages for each family for the winter. Trucks would line up outside the town on a certain day in the fall, and when the proper hour arrived, they would flood the city with cabbages, which were piled up on street corners in huge cabbage mountains which would then be distributed. Twenty years ago people in the north ate lots of bok choy / bai cai in the winter, making up about 95% of the vegetables in their diet.

In the 1990s plastic covered greenhouse technology became available, and even with the cold weather, farmers were able to grow vegetables of all sorts even in the cold weather. But you will find many families who will have a pile of bai cai on their porch "just in case" they don't get to the store during the winter months.

Cook Time

Prep Time: 15 minutes washing and chopping, 5 min stir frying

Total Time: 20 - 25 minutes

Serves: 4-6 people depending on what size serving you want

Ingredients

  • 2 and 1/2 pounds of baby bok choy or larger bok choy cut into 2 inch pieces.
  • 2 -3 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
  • 2 -3 tablespoons of minced scallions
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • SAUCE
  • 3 -4 Tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Chinese black vinegar - balsamic vinegar - or rice wine vinegar
  • 1/2 -1 tablespoons sugar - or more - depending on your taste
  • 3/4 teaspoon hot garlic paste or red chili flakes

Instructions

  1. A wok is best for this recipe, but you can also use a big frying pan. Mixing is easier in a wok if you have one because the wok is bigger and your vegetables won't go flying out of the pan when you stir them around.
  2. Heat 1-2 tablespoons oil in pan
  3. Cook the ginger first for a minute or two
  4. Add the garlic and scallions
  5. Put the bok choy into the pan, and mix everything together
  6. Stir fry until the cabbage is just barely tender.
  7. Then add the dressing, and put into a bowl.
  8. The tastiness of the recipe depends on your not cooking the cabbage for a long time. It should be crispy and fresh tasting, not soggy and damp.
  9. There are ingredients in the raw cabbage that are not so good for you if taken in huge quantities, but most people wouldn't dream of eating 2 or 3 pounds of raw cabbage a day for many days, so don't worry about that!
Cast your vote for Traditional Bok Choy Stir Fry

Bok Choy or Bai Cai? - Are you from Canton or from Beijing?

bok choy recipes
bok choy recipes

There are at least 14 language groups in China, and most of them would all have their own pronunciation for these two characters. But since the 1950s children have all been required to use Mandarin dialect in their schools, so most people in China would understand you only if you said Bai Cai. That is pronounced Bye Tsigh. (Like Sigh, but with a T sound put in front.). If you call it "Bok Choy" only those in the Cantonese speaking areas around Hong Kong will understand you.

Cabbage that has been salted for the winter - After it is salted, it is hung out to dry like laundry

salted chinese cabbage
salted chinese cabbage

You can see two kinds of cabbage here. One with fatter leaves, which is Bai Cai, and the other with longer leaves, which is Qing Cai (Ching Tsai).

Why would anyone do this?

The cabbage keeps better if it is salted, and can be "revived" if you soak it and then mix it with tasty seasonings. This method dates back to the time when veggies were scarce in the winter. By salting the cabbage, it would keep much longer. In the days before people had refrigerators, salting vegetables was a real option.

Is this really bok choy? - Some call it that...

bok choi qing cai
bok choi qing cai

Actually, it is called Qing Cai in Chinese. That is pronounced Ching Tsigh. It means "green vegetable"!

There are two kinds of Qingcai shown here.

The one on the left is the most common one in China. The one on the right, which we are very familiar with in the US, cannot be found in northern China. In fact, Northerners swear that this "Chinese cabbage" actually came from America! They call it "Foreign Qing Cai." I suspect it is really from the south near Hong Kong. At any rate, the cabbage in the right side of the photo is very tasty, and you can use it in any recipe that calls for Chinese Cabbage.

Caramelizing ginger to add to Chinese cabbage recipes - This is one flavor that makes it great!

bok choy recipes
bok choy recipes

I am not sure when I learned to caramelize ginger. But it was a revolution for my Chinese cabbage cooking. We often have guests who are not wild about Chinese cabbage, but with caramelized ginger mixed in or on top, they really enjoy it.

This photo below shows the ginger in the skillet, along with the dark brown sugar. If you heat the sugar in oil, it gets hot enough to caramelize.

I like to put the ginger in first, and then add the brown sugar to it and mix it all up. Then when it gets hot enough the brown sugar caramelizes right onto the ginger. In this photo I just wanted to make sure you could see how the sugar bubbles. Do you see it?

If you want to add caramelized ginger but are in a huge hurry or can't do it for some reason, you can always add crystallized ginger minced into fine pieces.

bok choy recipe
bok choy recipe

Chinese Green Cabbage (Qing Cai) with ginger - My favorite way to cook the "green" version of Chinese cabbage

I love this vegetable. And the best preparation is simple.

Since cabbage shrinks a lot when cooked, you need to begin with a lot in order to end up with enough for everyone.

Ingredients

  • 4 medium qing cai per person - less if they are larger - more if they are smaller
  • 1 -2 tablespoons minced ginger - or ginger powder
  • dark brown sugar - preferably from China because it has more molasses
  • pinch of salt

Instructions

  1. 1. Wash the Qing Cai well and let it drain. Then cut into 1-2 inch lengths.
  2. 2. Prepare your minced ginger. Make thin slices, then cut into ultra thin long strips, then mince off tiny squares. If you like ginger, make more. If you are not crazy about it, make less, or use a little ginger powder instead.
  3. 3. Put a small amount of oil in a wok or large frying pan. Add in the ginger and cook briefly. Then add a teaspoon or so of dark brown sugar and wait for it to turn to liquid and begin to caramelize. Make sure the ginger is coated with the sugar, but don't let it burn.
  4. 4. Quickly add in the Qing Cai, and stir until cooked. Sprinkle a pinch of salt and you are ready to eat!

In the spring the qing cai is fresh and green in the market

bok choy - qing cai
bok choy - qing cai

There are other forms of Chinese Cabbage - This one is called Ta Cai (pronounced Tah Tsigh)

ta cai
ta cai

I love all the different kinds of Chinese cabbage. This one in particular is a favorite. You can find it in the winter months in most of China.

Ta Cai is wonderful cooked with caramelized ginger, like the recipe for Qing Cai with Ginger above.

Have you eaten Bok Choy - Bai Cai in any form?

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    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 3 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @Aladdins Cave: Thank you - I like your comment! Wish the world was smaller and we Squidoo-ians could get together like that.

    • Aladdins Cave profile image

      Aladdins Cave 3 years ago from Melbourne, Australia

      Woops, I had no idea I was at the end of lens, that's why the silly comment below.

      Thank you for great lens and info. You write very well, and your lens LOOKS very good as well.

      Cheers from DOWNUNDER

    • Aladdins Cave profile image

      Aladdins Cave 3 years ago from Melbourne, Australia

      Yes I have. Very nice. I'll come over for dinner, better to learn from you directly than reading here. Say 6ish ?

    • jeskasight profile image

      jeskasight 4 years ago

      Thanks for all the info! I've never tried Bok choy as it is something foreign to me. I think my lover would really enjoy the caramelized ginger recipe. Cheers!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Use it all the time. Moms recipes

    • profile image

      Bartukas 4 years ago

      I love cooking great recipes

    • sara0129 profile image

      Shamim Rajabali 4 years ago from Texas

      Not yet. Will try one of your recipes

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @yonique88: Thanks - There are so many kinds of cabbage. I can imagine that you have one in Jamaica that is different. How do you cook it?

    • Blackspaniel1 profile image

      Blackspaniel1 4 years ago

      I like it as a complement to a dish.

    • yonique88 profile image

      yonique88 4 years ago

      Yes, but the one I have eaten here in Jamaica, I don't see you have any photos of that type on this lens. I really like your lens. It is very informative.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @Jogalog: Oooo those chillies... if you like it hot, that is definitely a good way to do it!

    • Jogalog profile image

      Jogalog 4 years ago

      I love it stir fried with beef, garlic, ginger and chillies.

    • Pat Broker profile image

      Pat Broker 4 years ago from Templeton, CA

      Yes! I love it stir fried. Thanks for the recipe.

    • profile image

      fivestead 4 years ago

      Bok Choy is wonderful and delicious. It is one of my favorites. Nice lens.

    • jc stone profile image

      Jordan 4 years ago

      I believe so i love Chinese food.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @SheilaMilne: It could be that you have an Asian grocery not too far away - maybe. I don't know where you live. It's easy to find them on the internet, or you can ask at a local Chinese restaurant to find out where you could get a bigger variety of Asian greens to choose from.

    • SheilaMilne profile image

      SheilaMilne 4 years ago from Kent, UK

      Yes, I have, but your recipes sound much better than the ones I've tried. The caramelised ginger is begging to be made as soon as possible! :) I think we only have the Qing Cai in the shops where I live.

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      lionmom100 4 years ago

      I have never cooked with it, but I might like to.

    • kindoak profile image

      kindoak 4 years ago

      Thanks, very interesting. I've always wondered what to do with these greens I keep seeing in the shop :)

    • Gayle Dowell profile image

      Gayle Dowell 4 years ago from Kansas

      I love chinese food and yes, I've had Bok Choy, but I've never cooked it myself. Thanks for the recipes!

    • artdivision1 lm profile image

      artdivision1 lm 4 years ago

      Yum, this is making me feel hungry! I love a good Bok Choy!

    • Heidi Vincent profile image

      Heidi Vincent 4 years ago from GRENADA

      Great Bok Choy lens, elynmac! Congratulations on your purple star. I eat Bok Choy mostly in salads.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @Hoanghaiyen: Bai Cai soup is very yummy. I like noodle soup with bai cai in it. It is SO yummy. I am a little allergic to shrimp so that doesn't work so well for me. Shrimp is so tasty.

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      Hoanghaiyen 4 years ago

      Yes, I use Bok Choy regularly, boiled Bok Choy and serve with soya sauce + hot chili, sometimes I cook Bok Choy soup with dried shrimp....

    • besgold-blend profile image

      besgold-blend 4 years ago

      yes but at that time i didn't realize that it is bok choy. great lens!

    • desa999 lm profile image

      desa999 lm 4 years ago

      Yes we cook this regularly and it is a great vegetable, especially in stir fries.

    • EsotericAllusion profile image

      EsotericAllusion 4 years ago

      Very interesting! Some healthy recipes here, but I haven't seen salted cabbage before.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I don't think I have. I would like to try it with the caramelized ginger.

    • mattcut profile image

      mattcut 4 years ago

      so much gorgeous natural beauty in one lens - thank you for creating this lovely lens !!!

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @surabhinafdey: Garlic and ginger. They are so yummy aren't they?

    • profile image

      surabhinafdey 4 years ago

      i wud love to try some.....I love the taste of garlic and ginger......

    • hntrssthmpsn profile image

      hntrssthmpsn 4 years ago

      We live in a town with a wonderful assortment of vegetable stands and farmers markets, and I see Bok Choy all the time... which leaves me somewhat sheepish about admitting I've never tried it. Time to fix that!

    • chocochipchip profile image

      chocochipchip 4 years ago

      Bok chop stir fry with minced pork and mushrooms is delicious and healthy as well

    • Dusty2 LM profile image

      Dusty2 LM 4 years ago

      Nice lens to a veggie i enjoy eating occasionally. I have had bok choy in the traditional bok choy stir fry and also when it was made into kimchi. I liked the crunchiness of the bok choy when eaten in either dish. Thank You for stopping by my Traditional Irish Stew Similar To Grandmas lens and giving it a "thumbs up" as I appreciate it. Hope you give the stew a try to will enjoy it. Bon Appetit! (^_^)

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @Ana Dilber: Now that is a cheery thought!

    • Ana Dilber profile image

      Ana Dilber 4 years ago

      Yes, it is very healthy. It contains high amounts of vitamin A, for 4 ounces, about 3500 IU (3086 IU per 100 grams), also contains high amounts of vitamin C, about 50 mg per 4 ounces (44 mg per 100 grams)

    • profile image

      anntag 4 years ago

      Cabbage is so often underated - your lens sheds new light on it in a fascinating way.

    • geoffhoff profile image

      geoffhoff 4 years ago

      I love every form you've mentioned here. Didn't realize Napa cabbage was actually Bok Choy! I get that several times a month. I love ginger and must try the caramelized recipe. Thanks!

    • Pinasheart profile image

      Pinasheart 4 years ago

      i love love bok choy! thanks~

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I love Bok Choy, when it is done right. Thanks for the recipes and great information!

    • Tracie-Fisher profile image

      Tracie-Fisher 4 years ago

      Thanks for the great walk through on various types of Bok Choy. I'm trying to expand my vegetable pallet and have been curious about this one. I'll give it a go.

    • Ardyn25 profile image

      Ardyn25 4 years ago

      I learned something new, I've never heard of Bok Choy. Thanks!

    • anaisfraiche profile image

      anaisfraiche 4 years ago

      I'm not Chinese but I'm from Malaysia so these vegetables are common to me. I eat most of these on daily basis. Will bookmark this for recipe ideas. Thanks!

    • Ben Reed profile image

      Ben Reed 4 years ago

      A wonderful dish.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @penmypage: Bai Cai is great with almost any sauce - it is really versatile.

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      penmypage 4 years ago

      Thanks for sharing this. I like how the names are based on the colour :) I don't like complicated veg names. Thanks for sharing the idea of sugar and ginger. Might try it one day as i simply fry my bai cai with oyster sauce, which is getting kinda boring, but its super fast when im in a hurry to eat.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @ksktika: Sounds good. Meat balls make a nice addition to something like this.

    • squidoopets profile image

      Darcie French 4 years ago from Abbotsford, BC

      Sure - I haven't cooked it myself but have had it plenty in take out Chinese food :D

    • ksktika profile image

      ksktika 4 years ago

      i love bok choy, but never know the real name. just fry them with onion and put some chili and add some meatball.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @anonymous: It's great in soup. When I was in college and got desperate, I would eat a packet of Ramen noodles with a whole lot of bai cai in it. Ramen doesn't have any good nutrition in it to speak of, but the bai cai did!

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      oceanth 4 years ago

      thankyou . will surely try it out!

    • profile image

      The-Quirky-Banana 4 years ago

      I eat bak choy all the time :P great lens! Congrats on the purple star! :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Yes. I love bok Choy. I use it in soup

    • robertzimmerman2 profile image

      Robert Zimmerman 4 years ago from SE Florida, USA

      Thanks, very educational. I love Bok Choy.

    • profile image

      john9229 4 years ago

      Yes, I love Bai Cai. Yummy.

    • Diana Wenzel profile image

      Renaissance Woman 4 years ago from Colorado

      Delicious! I love your recipes. I've made a commitment to eating more Bok Choy, and growing my own organically, because of its superfood status. Thanks for sharing such a tasty lens. Now I'm having some cravings.

    • Karli McClane profile image

      Psycho Free Zone 4 years ago from USA

      I've eaten all of these except for Ta Cai, which I've never even seen here in the USA.

    • nicenet profile image

      nicey 4 years ago

      I have never tried it.Although cabbage is no that sweet,it's a nutritious vegetable.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @Judith Nazarewicz: Becoming a Bok Choy expert is a great idea - it's very healthy, and especially healthy in the spring when the seasons change, according to Chinese medicine.

    • Judith Nazarewicz profile image

      Judith Nazarewicz 4 years ago from Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

      Love Bok Choy! My son and grandkids moved back home after living in China for 14 years so I've learned how to cook bok choy a number of ways. I wasn't to familiar with it prior to them moving back home but now I think I'm becoming an expert. :-)

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      healthusa 4 years ago

      I really like cabbage salad but I don't i'v ever had it with Bok Choy or ever mixed ginger with cabbage but I'm going to hav e to try it some time. Thanks for the recipes!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Awesome lens! Purple Star worthy! My husband and I love cabbage. Shared this via Pinterest. http://pinterest.com/pin/183943966002679179/

    • Michey LM profile image

      Michey LM 4 years ago

      I read a lot about Bok Choy, but I didn't have recipes which will tempt me to thy. So. Thanks, it is a useful lens for me, and I'll try both recipes.

    • captainj88 profile image

      Leah J. Hileman 4 years ago from East Berlin, PA, USA

      I enjoy all cabbages. And I love anything with ginger in it. Must try!

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @ladyyummy: That is another wonderful wonderful way to make it.

    • Fridayonmymind LM profile image

      Fridayonmymind LM 4 years ago

      Yum, love it stir fired with some oyster dauce. I am going to try the ginger, that sounds yum.

    • ladyyummy profile image

      ladyyummy 4 years ago

      Yummm!! My mom cooks bok choy with bacon or small pieces of meat. GREAT lens! :)

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Bok Choy is a great functional food. Thanks for giving me new ideas on how to prepare it.

    • Tom Maybrier profile image

      Tom Maybrier 4 years ago

      Many forms! Love it!

    • ismeedee profile image

      ismeedee 4 years ago

      I always use bok choy in my stir frys... you've given me some great new ways to cook it now, and more variety is always very welcome!

    • bushaex profile image

      Stephen Bush 4 years ago from Ohio

      A superb and definitive Bok Choy lens. It's almost as if a Hollywood producer said, "We can't call this a white vegetable". What do you think of Bok Choy? And the rest is history!

    • chi kung profile image

      chi kung 4 years ago

      just in a salad so far :)

    • jlshernandez profile image

      jlshernandez 4 years ago

      I love baby bok choy with black mushrooms. Sometimes I like them in soup with won ton.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @anonymous: Bless you Tiipi. I am so glad you like it!

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @petertraoassi2: Oh yes - I love baby bok choy. Yum!

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @Holly22: Pak Choy is another way to write Bai Cai (like Bok Choy).

      It is wonderful with garlic. I like to take a few garlic cloves and crush it into fine mush using a mortar and pestle. Then add some salt to it, as much as you would use in your whole dish. If you mash this for a minute or two, it takes the hard stinging edge off the garlic, and leaves a richer, more subtle flavor. You might like to try that next time and see if you like it.

    • Holly22 profile image

      Christine and Peter Broster 4 years ago from Tywyn Wales UK

      I really enjoy eating bok choy and I actually grew some in my garden last year along with Pak Choy. I like cooking it with garlic.

    • petertraoassi2 profile image

      petertraoassi2 4 years ago

      Especially BABY bok choy is the best! love it. thanks.

    • Close2Art LM profile image

      Close2Art LM 4 years ago

      I can eat it raw or stir fried and thanks for sharing your recipes

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Returning with a FB like, because I really like this! :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Returning with a FB like, because I really like this! :)

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      What a lesson you are giving here of Chinese culture, food and launguage through Bok Choy. I was amazed at that 95% and how durable Bok Choy is. Now I know what authentic bok choy is supposed to look like, though I have never bought any. The carmelized ginger perked up my tongue. Thank you for another wonderful experience of your life in China....I see you already were awarded 5 blessings...very well deserved! :)

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @fifta: I agree with you about eating bok choy with chicken noodle soup. It is so easy to add to other dishes - and then you get even better nutrition from the addition. I am working on eating fewer carbohydrates. I have discovered that if I eat a very small bowl of rice, I want more, but if I mix veggies into the same small bowl of rice, I feel more satisfied, and don't need extra carbs. Very interesting.

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      LadyDuck 4 years ago

      I like bok choi, your recipes are very interesting. Thanks for sharing :D

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      MichaelDubrovnik 4 years ago

      Very interesting Lens! I was confused about Bok Choy - they look so different every time I see them in the grocery shops! This lens proves it wasn't my illusion.. they all look very different and they all call Bok Choy!

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      miller83 4 years ago

      Yes eaten bok choy and loved it. Thanks for the recipes. Great lens.

    • profile image

      miller83 4 years ago

      Yes eaten bok choy and loved it. Thanks for the recipes. Great lens.

    • PinkstonePictures profile image

      PinkstonePictures 4 years ago from Miami Beach, FL

      Yes, I love it

    • fifta profile image

      fifta 4 years ago

      Wohoo.. I love bok choy. I usually cook it in a stir fry or just boil it and eat it with chicken noodle. Yummy..

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @webscribbler: It is very similar. It would be fine for cole slaw.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @makarenko: This is another wonderfully tasty way - yum!

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @nick-gondoras: I adore it this way, and it is very very simple. If you love caramelized ginger, you can make extra and save some to sprinkle on top. Yum.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @Countryluthier: Ooooo. Yes. If you like HOT & SPICY kimchi is terrific.

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image
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      Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

      @fredginni: It mixes well in salads.

    • Blackspaniel1 profile image

      Blackspaniel1 4 years ago

      Great, now I want to eat. Well done.

    • fredginni profile image

      fredginni 4 years ago

      I have a vegetable salad I make in the summer that I love. Bok Choy is one of 9 vegetables in that salad.

    • makarenko profile image

      makarenko 4 years ago

      Yes! I love it lightly cooked in a little oil, with a pinch of sea salt, some soy sauce, lemon and ginger - very quick and really delicious! - I am guessing healthy too...

    • Countryluthier profile image

      E L Seaton 4 years ago from Virginia

      Many times over but in Kimchi!! Great vegetable and awesome lens. COUNTRYLUTHIER blessed

    • nick-gondoras profile image

      nick-gondoras 4 years ago

      Going to try to carmelize ginger... :-)

    • knitstricken profile image

      knitstricken 4 years ago

      Comprehensive! Hubby just brought home some baby bok choy yesterday. Can't wait to share this lens with him!