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Bread Making Tips

Updated on January 19, 2015

Bread Making Tips - lets make some real dough!

Are you looking for answers to any of your breadmaking problems? Is your bread too slow to rise, or maybe it's rising too fast? Is your bread too crumbly? Does it taste too "yeasty"? What happens if you use too much yeast?

Find all the bread making tips you need and the answers to all of your bread questions right here. If you can't find the answer you need, just ask and I will find it for you or point you in the right direction.

Now lets get serious about making some real dough!

Image Credit: Stock Free Images & Dreamstime Stock Photos

If you aren't happy with the results of your home made bread or your family turn their noses up as soon as the bread has cooled, you need to read on. This page is filled with bread making tips and simple solutions to common bread making problems.

You'll find what to do if you are interrupted in your bread making and have to go out. Do you want to know how to prepare your doughs so that you can bake them off at a later time? Do you know what "par-baked" bread is? All of these questions and many more are answered below, just keep reading.

Still Life - Bread
Still Life - Bread | Source

Yeast- What is it?

Yeasts are micro-organisms related to fungi that have been used by humans for baking and brewing for thousands of years. Yeast consumes simple sugars and produces carbon dioxide and alcohol as waste products. Bakers yeast prefers to live in a temperature range of around 30°C - 37°C but will survive at lower temperatures. It will die at temperatures above 50°C.

Questions About Mixing, Molding and Kneading

How can I tell if I have used the right amount of flour and water?

As a general rule, once you reach the kneading stage if the dough no longer sticks to your work surface or your hands then you have the right flour to water ratio. Of course if the dough is very tough and hard to work, you may need to add a little water.

Why do most bread varieties allow for a variation in the amount of flour used or the amount of water added?

Flour or water is always considered to be variable for a number of reasons. Humidity plays the biggest role in determining how much water will actually be absorbed by your flour. If you are in an area with high humidity, you will need to use slightly less water (or slightly more flour) to avoid your doughs being overly wet and sticky. Another factor can be the flour itself. Flour quality can vary and as a general rule a higher quality flour has a higher protein content, which will take on more water to form gluten.

Is it possible to knead too much?

Yes it is possible but it is unlikely when hand mixing. Pay close attention when using an electric mixer to mix and knead your dough. Stop mixing when the dough has reached an even consistency and stretches easily but still has some elasticity. You can test the gluten development by plucking a small piece of dough and see if it can be stretched out thinly without tearing. Overmixing breaks down the gluten which results in a tacky dough that is difficult to work with and can have reduced volume due to poor gas retention.

Enjoy Fresh Bread Every Day! - It really is this easy!

Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking
Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking

There’s nothing like the smell of freshly baked bread to fill a kitchen with warmth, eager appetites, and endless praise for the baker who took on such a time-consuming task. Now, you can fill your kitchen with the irresistible aromas of a French bakery every day with just five minutes of active preparation time, and Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day will show you how.

 

More on Mixes and Molding

Do I need a special recipe for rolls?

No, most bread recipes are also suitable for producing bread rolls. Just cut the dough into small pieces and form into the shapes required.

Why is my wholemeal dough slow to rise?

It's normal for wholemeal, rye or grain breads to rise slower than white breads. If you have this problem, add a little more yeast to your recipe.

What to do if your bread tastes great, but it's uneven and lumpy?

This is probably due to your final molding. Take a little more time to produce the final shapes you want. Any flaws made when you are molding, such as tearing the dough or not rolling it out evenly will be magnified after the final proof.

Kneading and Gluten Development

What causes bread to have a coarse texture or is crumbly?

Both problems can be caused by not enough kneading/mixing. During the mixing process gluten is produced from the proteins in the flour. Gluten forms the cells in the bread which retain the CO2 gas produced by fermentation. This gluten needs to be worked or developed enough so that it becomes flexible and can expand while still retaining gas. Under or overmixing results in poor cell/crumb structure. Some varieties of flour, such as cake flour or wholemeal and grain flours, are lower in protein and will produce bread that is more crumbly.

Why are my loaves too small?

This could be caused by a number of things but most of them can be overcome by allowing longer prooving times. If your bread is bigger when it goes to the oven, your results will be better. Some other causes could be due to too much salt or not enough yeast in the dough. Under or over mixing could result in poor gluten development so the dough does not retain as much gas. If your oven is too hot, you will get less oven-spring (rising in the oven) because the excess heat kills the yeast faster.

Simple Way to Improve Your Bread - Use a Dough Enhancer

Easy French Bread Made at Home

What is Bread Flour?

Bread flour is high protein flour produced from hard wheat. Soft wheat produces lower protein flour with lower protein levels such as all purpose flour and cake flour. The protein in bread flour forms gluten during the breadmaking process. Gluten forms the cell structure and retains carbon dioxide in the bread, giving it volume. Low protein flours, including whole grain flours can be strengthened by the addition of gluten.

Questions about Prooving and Baking

How long should it take for the dough to rise in the first prooving?

This can vary due to a lot of factors but a general rule would be 1 to 2 hours, or as long as it takes for the dough to at least double in size. Yeast prefers to live in tropical conditions so the closer you can appoximate this the better. Ideally you would place your dough in a warm place around 30-40 degrees celsius. In cooler places it will just take a little longer. Don't worry if you can't manage to keep your dough this warm, slower doughs will still produce good (and sometimes better) bread. One other tip, if you have a suitable thermometer, check the temperature of your dough straight after you finish kneading. Ideally it should be around 27 C. You can control this finished dough temperature by using warmer or cooler water in your mix.

How long does it take to rise for the second proof?

Usually the final proof will take about half the time of the first prooving. Again it's usually enough when the dough has doubled in size.

What causes loaves to "sink" during baking?

If the dough is allowed to over-proove, that is, become too large, the gluten which forms the cells in the bread may be stretched to it's limits. When the dough is placed in the oven, the gas in the bread expands, tearing the gluten and escapes. Simply put, the bubbles burst and your bread deflates. This could also be a result of overmixing which weakens the gluten in the early stages.

Watch out for Over-Prooving

What to do if the dough has over-prooved?

You can knock the dough back down and remold it into shape, it will rise again. Try to avoid doing this more than once as eventually the yeast runs out of food or the gluten becomes too weak and the quality of the bread will suffer.

What can I do if I have to go out after making the dough?

Once mixing/kneading is finished you can store the dough in a sealed container or even a plastic bag and place it in your refrigerator. Putting the dough in a cold place slows down the fermentation. This is known as "retarding" the dough. You can take it out later, form it into the shapes you need and then allow it to rise as usual. Note that it will take a little longer to rise due to being at a lower temperature.

Bread Forms
Bread Forms | Source

Why Use Salt in Bread?

Salt is added to most bread recipes for three main reasons. It strengthens gluten, controls the yeast and adds flavour. Salt is actually poisonous to yeast. Small amounts of salt, around 2% of the flour weight, are used to control the rate of fermentation by retarding the growth of yeast.

Retard Doughs or Par-bake to Finish Baking Later

Can I retard doughs after molding?

Yes, you can form your dough into the shapes needed, then cover them and place in the refrigerator until you are ready to take them out, proove and bake them. If doing this it is best to leave the dough no longer than a few days before baking. It's a handy method for producing two or three days bread at a time, just bake it off as needed.

What is "par-baked" bread and can I make it at home?

Par-baked bread is essentially any bread variety that has been made in the usual manner but is not fully baked. It is removed from the oven as soon as it has baked enough to hold it's form. It can then be stored refrigerated or even frozen. When the bread is required it is removed from refrigeration and placed in the oven to finish baking, usually taking 10 to 15 minutes to finish off. It's a handy way to put fresh bread on the table in a matter of minutes. You can produce your own par-baked bread simply by taking your bread from the oven about 10 minutes earlier than usual, allowing it to cool then store in a container or plastic bag and refrigerate.

© 2008 Steven Cousley

Do you have any questions?

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    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 3 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @christophersmoore: Increase your proving time so the yeast can produce more gas and increase the volume of your bread.

    • profile image

      christophersmoore 3 years ago

      how do you get bread sticks not to be dense

    • smine27 profile image

      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      I love making bread at home, although I use a bread baker these days. Thank you for these incredible and helpful tips!

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Thats a good question. The first thing that comes to mind is a moulding fault that causes an air pocket inside the bread. Do you use a lot of dusting flour when you are moulding the loaf into shape?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I've been making bread (half white, half wholemeal) for years, and have recently had a new problem. The finished loaf, though the dough is well kneaded, splits internally about a quarter of the way down, leaving a blank horizontal gap in every slice.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: A banneton needs to be "conditioned". You might get away with a heavy dusting of flour for the first few uses. Check this page for further info http://sourdough.com/blog/how-care-bannetons

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I am making sourdough which works great.The only problem I have is,I let rise

      overnight in a well floured banneton but the problem is getting it out onto the

      baking stone.The top crust is sticking to the banneton.Any ideas?

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Sounds like the top is baking faster. Try a lower oven temperature or experiment with baking on a higher or lower shelf in your oven.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      What causes rye bread to raise more on the top half of loaf, but seems heavy on the bottom when

      baking it?

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Would be hard to guess without any clues.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Why does the surface of my bread look like the surface of the moon? Tastes good anyway.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: You could try a different citrus juice. Citric acid is often used as a dough enhancer in bread recipes.

    • Allison Whitehead profile image

      Allison Whitehead 4 years ago

      I love making home baked bread. You can't beat it! Soda bread is one of my favourites, especially when served with jam.... mmmm...

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Rye flours are lower in gluten proteins and usually do not rise as much as yeast breads. I would suggest less kneading and also reduce the time of your first proving to avoid the gluten being over-stressed during the final proof.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have a whole wheat bread recipe that calls for lemon juice. Can I substitute something else?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      my first rise is great, the second is flat or spreading out not rising..it usually happens with the rye bread recipe from Mile End cookbook...thank you in advance

    • profile image

      THELASTRETURN 4 years ago

      I learned to bake bread by watching my mother who watched her mother and so on. I even use the same bread raiser that has been in my family for generations. My bread turns out different each time I bake. You have some great tips here thanks for sharing.

    • Badbreathguy profile image

      Badbreathguy 4 years ago

      I enjoy baking then eating home made bread which I make most days in my breadmaker. Whoever invented them did me a great favour. It saves a lot of time and mess, and washing up afterwards.

      Nice lens.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: There isn't one. The temperature inside any loaf of bread is likely to reach around 100 celsius while baking (the temp of boiling water) but that doesn't give an indication that the bread is fully baked. The best way to tell if a loaf is baked is to turn it over, then knock on the bottom to check if it sounds hollow.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      what is recommended temperture of bead when finished baking?

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Is your bread hand or machine made?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Everything about my wheat/white bread turns out great except the top. There seems to be a large air pocket under the top crust. What is wrong?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I made 2 white loaves in the machine and 1 by hand using sainsburys strong white bread flour. The 2 in the machine didn't mix well as there was flour around the sides still after baking and after 'cooking' they only had a thin soft crust but were raw dough in the middle. So i made a loaf by hand to the same recipe, it kneaded and rose well, then kneaded and rose well in the tin. Was meant to cook for 30 mins, after 38 it still wasn't browning so took it out and just like the 2 machine loaves it had a thing rubbery crust and was like a raw dough inside. Its not the yeast as i used the same yeast to make a brown loaf while i was hand making the white loaf and the brown was great.

      ANY ideas why the white loaves did this? Very strange, and its can't be the machine as its making good bread with other flours! HELP!!!

    • dawnsnewbeginning profile image

      dawnsnewbeginning 4 years ago

      Lots of good advice here. Thanks

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: My best guess would be that the top of the rolls is drying out during the proving stage or too early in the baking stage. Try spraying or brushing with water several times while the dough is rising. You could also place a shallow pan of water in the bottom of the oven to produce some steam while baking.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I use my Kitchenaid mixer to make bread dough, it rises well and I shape into rolls and they rise well, also. My recipe says to bake at 400 degree but the top of the rolls are hard. The inside and bottoms are fine and the rolls taste fine. What is causing the top of the rolls to be hard?

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Yes it would be possible. You could probably expect your bread to have a hard thicker crust as the dough would be dried out and won't start to colour until a high enough temperature is reached. Not sure on the energy saving as you would still have to leave your bread in the oven long enough to bake right through. It may take longer for the oven to reach baking temperature.

      Bread machines are smaller than most ovens so less energy is needed to heat the smaller volume. Because of the smaller volume they would also reach baking temperature much faster.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      A not so simple question. Would it be possible to bake a bread in the oven starting at room temperature and warming the oven to 465 Fahrenheit? Would you save energy doing this? A breadmachine also starts at room temperature.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Have you tried using less water, making a tighter dough? You could also experiment with kneading time.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My bread tends to spread out not rise up. Overall the texture is good although flatish.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: If you want a bigger or smaller loaf just adjust your quantities. If you are looking for more volume in your bread try adding a little baking soda.

    • cjbmeb14 lm profile image

      cjbmeb14 lm 4 years ago

      The Cheddar cheese bread recipe looks interesting.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      When making soda bread in machine how can I make it fit the baking container?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Gosh what a comprehensive lens. Thanks I will bookmark this one

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: How long do you knead?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      why have i keep getting holes in the middle of my wholemeal bread .i hand knead my bread.diana compton

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: A little either way will not make a huge difference. However since it is the gluten forming proteins in the flour that gives the bread it's structure and volume, reducing it too much would not be a good thing.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      when making yeast bread is the amount of flour used a factor in how it turns out is it better to have a little to much flour or a little less.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: The stickiness suggests another potential problem. You can add reducing the amount of water to the list of things to experiment with.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @StevenCousley: thank you. I will try again but not today...3 failures in one day is tooooo frustrating but now I do have hope. Was it ok with the dough being not really smooth right away, when I try to make the window pain test it usually tears, but is sticky...I'm wondering if i'm just not kneading enough. Also, it has been raining here for over a month :( Thanks again :)

    • StevenCousley profile image
      Author

      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Sounds like a case of over-proving to me. Tripling in size twice is likely to have caused a lot of stress on the gluten structure, resulting in the crumbly texture you have described. The problem could lie in your recipe, the mixing/kneading or proving stages. I would suggest experimenting to solve the problem. First of all try reducing the yeast in the recipe a little. Use a cooler water temperature to produce a slower fermentation. Vary your mixing time to see what works best with your particular mixer. Reduce your proving time, don't allow your dough to more than double. These are just a few suggestions, try some or all of them. Keep experimenting till you figure what works best.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Sour dough starters are a living thing which can be tricky to maintain. I'm sorry to say it sounds like yours has not survived. Do a little more research on sour dough baking and try again.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi Steven, it's Dakacee again...I forgot to mention that I love your site and I am now addicted. I had never heard of squidoo before, so I am trying to work my way around here. Again, love your info, and thanks so very much for sharring your knowledge..cheers, from Canada :-)

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi there, just came across your website while trying to find out what went wrong with my cinnamon buns. I have done three batches now and...well...they are still not quite that stretchy silky texture when you pull them apart. They are slightly crumbly (the first batch was like a pound cake). I am not sure if I am kneading enough. I am using my mixer but I am scarred of over kneading. They also had lots of bubbles when I was in the rolling out stage. After the first proof, it rose at least double , maybe even tripled, but then deflated quite a bit when touched, and the dough just didn't seem puffy smoooooth.. They rose 3 times the size on the 2nd proof as well, but when I rolled it out there was a lot of bubbles. The taste is there but not that silky stretch that a big fat cinnamon bun should have. Your help..any help would be soooo appreciated before I ruin another batch. Thanks tremendously!!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Made fresh sour dough starter. First batch beautiful, following not rising. All conditions same. Please advise.

    • StevenCousley profile image
      Author

      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Not likely to get a happy result. The bread will not rise again as the yeast would have been killed during the baking.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My yeast bread didn't cook in the middle...it has cooled but can I put it back in the oven? Or should I put it in a warm place to make it rise again? WAH!!

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Then it's not a bread recipe

    • StevenCousley profile image
      Author

      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Is this a bubble inside the bread or in the crust?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      what if a recipe does not ask for any liquids?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Why do I get a bubble in the loaf after baking? It doesn't appear when I first put it into the oven.

    • StevenCousley profile image
      Author

      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Experiment and see what works best. Let some double in size before rolling. Try some with a shorter proof and see how it goes.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Experiment and see what works best for you. Let some double in size before rolling out. Try some with a shorter proof and see what works best.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: I can't see the recipe you are using so I don't know.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Are you using bread making flour? If so, try reducing your proving time. Your bread should continue to rise in the oven.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Why is easy yeast rolls rising times are so short

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      i am letting frozen bread dough thaw out and rise before rolling it out to make pizza breads. Is this ok & how large should i let it rise?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      With regular white yeast bread after the first rising I shape into loaves, let rise to the proper size, then put into heated oven. Invariably though the loaves fall flat. I have tried less kneading, more kneading...is there something else?

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: I doubt it. If the dough is dead, it's dead.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Lots of possibilities. Not enough yeast, yeast too old, too much salt, too much sugar, overmixing the fruit. There are plenty more.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @rdecklar: It will still work. Maybe a slight increase in proving time..

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @rdecklar: Yes. It will still work.

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      rdecklar 4 years ago

      i accidentally put active dry yeast in my dough without dissolving it first, is this ok?

    • profile image

      rdecklar 4 years ago

      i accidentally used active dry yeast instead of instant dry yeast in my bread dough,how can I fix it?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have raisin bread dough that didn't rise. Can I still use it for rolls or bisquits?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      what would cause homemade raisin bread not to rise?

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Yes it could. She may need to reduce the water quantity a little and reduce the water temperature to slow the fermentation.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: This is often the case in rye bread recipes because rye flour is low in gluten. Gluten gives the bread it's structure and retains the carbon dioxide produced during fermentation, allowing bread to rise. Rye bread recipes that contain little or no white flour will produce heavier more dense bread.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Sounds like the dough is exhausted.If the yeast runs out of food (sugar or starch) there is no more fermentation. If your initial proof rises too fast or for too long you will have problems during the final proof. Using cooler water, less yeast or a shorter first proof may fix this problem.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: From your description I would suspect the yeast. The strong alcohol odour and flavour suggests over fermentation. It's possible the flour could also be a factor. Replace both and see how it goes.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Bread making is not an exact science. variations in flour quantity, temperature of water, oreven local humidity are just some of the factors that can vary in different locations. In your case it sounds like your dough may be overproving before it reaches the oven. Try getting it to the oven a little sooner. You could also experiment with water temperatures to see what happens.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Reduce your baking time. It may also help to add a little more water to your dough. Whole wheat and grains absorb moisture and may contribute to your problem.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: There are a lot of different bread machines out there with different cycles. You should read the manual for your particular model.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Yes. Try adding sugar and/or oil to your recipe.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: If you are baking in an oven try baking using a different shelf each time you bake and see if it makes a difference. It's possible that the heat may not be even in your oven and therefore the top of the loaf is baked faster than the bottom.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have a friend who moved to Senegal N Africa. She's having trouble w her breadmaking-does the high humidity there bread baking very different?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I am making rye bread. Why does the recipe call for more white flour than rye flour?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      What would cause rolls to rise on the second rising until not even double and then stop and look dimply?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      can a wheat flour get too old to make bread with? I made a homemade wheat bread from a recipe I've used before and had always had success with but I tried it twice in a row now and it smells and taste like sttrong alcohol!!???? Had to chuck it. I then proceeded to do an italian bread which turned out much better but had a hint of sour taste to it that I never had problems with in the past. Is it the flour? or the yeast? I have no idea what's going on. These recipes have never given me trouble before. I'm deffinitely stumped

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I use the Jim lahey method for baking bread, and the dough is rising fine, even the second time, but once it is in the dutch oven it does not rise anymore as it is supposed to. I end up with a nice tasting, but totally flat bread. I use a 10 1/4 inch dutch oven, preheated at 500f for half an hour. What to do? I saw my niece in the US make the bread, and it came out beautifully. I adhere to the recipe very strictly

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      my whole wheat rolls always come out dry and hard ,help me thank you ,

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      a recipe for bread maker onion,garlic,cheddar bread says to put the onion,garlic and cheese in during the baking. How do I know when it is that time?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      if the bread possible to soft until 3days or more...how?

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Yes it is

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Almost every loaf is tasty,and looks good on the outside,but the crumb is often dense,and the bottom half inch of the loaf is much more so,often a bit doughy.any ideas please.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Is It alright to use a plastic bowl for mixing bread

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: I would suggest using less yeast. You may then need a longer proving time.

    • StevenCousley profile image
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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Depends on what stage the machine had reached when it was interrupted. Different machines have different cycles. It may be possible to choose a reduced cycle. You could even take the dough (assuming your bread is still in a dough stage) from the machine and complete mixing/molding by hand, allow time to prove and then bake in oven.

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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: The dryness could be caused by baking too long. Try a shorter baking time but increase temperature to retain crust colour.

      The crumbly texture could be the result of an underdeveloped dough. Your hand mixer and paddles may not be doing a good job of developing the dough. Try hand kneading the dough for 15 to 20 minutes and see how that goes.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      WHAT DO YOU DO IF YOUR BREAD MACHINE WAS INTERRUPTED DURING A CYCLE

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      how can i make the bread without yeasty taste and smell. what is the secret to make the yeast not tasty and smelly on the bread. thank you so much! hope i can hear answers from you.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Why did my homemade rolls come out dry & crumbly. I do not have a bread machine. I used my hand mixer with paddle attachments

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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Why are you using chilled water? If your dough is too cold it will slow the fermentation. In an ideal situation your dough should reach a temperature around 27 celsius after mixing. Try increasing the temperature of the water and see what happens. Experiment with different temperatures.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      what can i do to correct it

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      please i experienced rough surface on my bread and i used chilled water but i don't know why i am still having it

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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Yes it could

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      Steven Cousley 4 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      @anonymous: Try kneading your bread longer to improve dough development

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @StevenCousley: could it be a moisture issue?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      when i slice my bread i find it verry week in the middle with big holes only in the middle 1/2 of the loaf.