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New England VS. Manhattan Clam Chowder

Updated on May 21, 2009

The Battle Rages On !

What's your favorite style of Clam Chowder ?

New England Clam Chowder

As in all things, it is conceivable that I could be wrong in stating that New England clam chowder is the best. I know there are actually people out there who would say otherwise in favor of the Manhattan clam chowder. They're probably all from New York, but that's beside the point.

The point is, I'd like to know what you think. Just to help facilitate your decision, I have icluded below, recipes for both styles of clam chowder. Perhaps one of these days, you'll get real motivated and actually make both of them in one day and invite friends over for a real taste testing duel.

By the way, both of the recipes are compliments of Food Network.com. I do really know how to cook, but I kind of do everything by taste and don't have anything written down with all the measurements and such. So, getting the recipes from elsewhere was just more convenient.

Emeril Lagasse's Recipe

Cook Time1 hr 5 min

Level

Intermediate

Yield

4 quarts, 12 servings

Ingredients:

10 pounds small quahogs or large cherrystone clams, scrubbed and rinsed, open clams discarded

6 slices bacon, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch strips

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 medium leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced crosswise (2 1/2 to 3 cups)

1 cup finely chopped onions

1 cup finely chopped celery

2 teaspoons minced garlic

6 sprigs fresh thyme

2 bay leaves

2 pounds potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 5 cups)

2 cups heavy cream

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 1/4 teaspoons salt, or to taste

6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into half-tablespoon pieces

1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley

1/4 cup finely chopped fresh chives or green onions

Directions:

In a large stockpot bring 3 cups of water to a boil. Add the clams, cover, and cook for 5 minutes. Uncover the pot and quickly stir the clams with a wooden spoon. Cover and cook 5 to 10 minutes longer (this will depend on the type and size of the clams), or until most of the clams are open.

Transfer the clams to a large bowl or baking dish and strain the broth twice through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl, being careful to strain out the sand. (You should have about 8 cups of clam broth. If not, add enough water to bring the volume up to 8 cups.) When the clams are cool enough to handle, remove them from their shells and chop into 1/2-inch pieces. Set the clams and broth aside.

Cook the bacon in a large heavy pot over medium heat until crisp and the fat is rendered. Pour off all the bacon fat except 2 tablespoons. Add the 4 tablespoons butter, leeks, onions, and celery and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, thyme, and bay leaves and cook until the vegetables are thoroughly wilted, about 3 minutes, being careful not to brown. Add the potatoes and reserved clam broth and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, cover, and simmer until the broth thickens slightly and the potatoes are very tender, about 30 minutes. (If you like a thicker broth, mash some of the potatoes against the side of the pot with a wooden spoon.). Remove from the heat, Discard the thyme stems and bay leaves, stir in the clams and cream, and season with the pepper and the salt to taste.

Set the chowder aside for 1 hour, covered, to allow the flavors to marry. Place the pot over low heat and slowly reheat, being careful not to let boil. Serve hot; garnish each bowl with a pat of butter and some parsley and chives.

Chowder in a Sourdough Bowl

Chowder in a Sourdough Bowl
Chowder in a Sourdough Bowl

What's It Going To Be Folks ?

Which One Do You Like Best ?

Manhattan Clam Chowder

Emeril Lagasse's Recipe

Yield: 6 to 8 main course servings

Ingredients:

8 pounds quahog or large cherrystone clams, scrubbed and rinsed, opened clams discarded

4 slices bacon, cut into 1/2-inch lengths

2 cups finely chopped onion

1 cup finely chopped celery

1/2 cup chopped bell pepper

3/4 cup diced carrot

1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic

3 bay leaves

1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves

4 sprigs fresh thyme

1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper

1 1/4 pounds potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 3 cups)

1 cup chicken stock

3 cups peeled, seeded and chopped tomatoes or 1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes, chopped and juices reserved

1/4 cup chopped parsley leaves

Freshly ground black pepper

Salt

Directions:

In a large stockpot bring 2 cups of water to a boil. Add clams, cover and cook for 5 minutes. Uncover, quickly stir clams well with a wooden spoon, and recover. Allow clams to cook 5 to 10 minutes longer (this will depend on the type and size of clams you are using), or until most of the clams are opened. Transfer clams to a large bowl or baking dish and strain broth through a fine-meshed sieve into a bowl. (You should have about 6 cups of clam broth. If not, add enough water to bring the volume up to 6 cups.) When clams are cool enough to handle, remove them from their shells and chop into 1/2-inch pieces. Set clams and broth aside.

In a large heavy pot add bacon and render until golden and crispy. Pour off all fat except 4 tablespoons. Add onions, celery, bell pepper and carrots and cook for 10 minutes, until vegetables are softened. Do not allow to color. Add garlic, bay leaves, oregano, thyme and crushed red pepper and cook an additional 2 minutes. Increase heat to high and add potatoes, reserved clam broth, and chicken stock and bring to a boil, covered. Cook for 20 minutes, or until potatoes are tender and the broth has thickened somewhat. Add tomatoes and continue to cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat and add reserved clams and parsley and season with pepper and salt, if necessary. Allow chowder to sit for up to 1 hour to allow flavors to meld, then reheat slowly over low fire if necessary. Do not allow to boil.

Non- Dairy Manhattan Style Chowder

Non- Dairy Manhattan Style Chowder
Non- Dairy Manhattan Style Chowder

Thanks For Your Comments

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    • profile image

      HuntAndFishGuides 

      6 years ago

      I didn't even realize there was a difference between the two. Thanks for sharing!

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      7 years ago

      Thanks for the lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      7 years ago

      Thanks for the lens.

    • Ramkitten2000 profile image

      Deb Kingsbury 

      8 years ago from Flagstaff, Arizona

      I actually just had a bowl of Chunky New England Clam Chowder for dinner tonight. What a coinky-dink.

    • TreasuresBrenda profile image

      Treasures By Brenda 

      8 years ago from Canada

      Excellent job; blessed by an Angel.

    • nopantstees lm profile image

      nopantstees lm 

      9 years ago

      Good debate topic, but clearly New England wins. Manhattan can't put up much of a fight.

    • Holley Web profile image

      Holley Web 

      9 years ago

      I love Clam Chowder! New England is my favorite and I love the way it looks in the bread bowl.. cook for me?

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      9 years ago

      They look so tasty! Very nice job.

    • KimGiancaterino profile image

      KimGiancaterino 

      9 years ago

      I'm allergic to both, but your lens looks great!

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