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Collectible Cast Iron: Griswold Pans and Skillets

Updated on May 8, 2016
Photos on this article are my own or are courtesy of Wikimedia.
Photos on this article are my own or are courtesy of Wikimedia.

Vintage cookware that maintains its quality.

If you are a collector of cast iron then you may be well aware of the Griswold name and the amazing line of cast iron products that bear this trademark.

Although they produced a number of cast iron products it is their fine line of cast iron cookware which gained them international fame.

The Griswold Manufacturing Company was in operation from 1865 to 1957 and during that time it gained an outstanding reputation as a producer of quality cast iron products.


History of Griswold Cast Iron Cookware

Locally made in the United States it was two families in Erie, Pennsylvania who in 1865 proudly opened the Selden and Griswold company bearing their names in its title.

Throughout 1865 to 1883 their products bore the trademark symbol of Selden & Griswold on them. The logo changed throughout the years but a distinctive logo has been featured on each cast iron item manufactured by the company.

Hinges, waffle irons, pots, pans, and roasters cast by the company can be identified by their distinctive logo. Skillets also bear a number on them to indicate their size. Collectors use these symbols to identify Griswold cast iron products.

Highly treasured as a collectable the Griswold cookware is generally now collected and valued by the degree of rarity of the pan's size number. For example, a collector may be searching for a number 5 or a number 10 skillet to add to his current collection.


Do you have cast iron pots and pans in your home?

Do you have cast iron pots and pans in your home?

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Cast Iron Hasn't Change Much Throughout the Years

Source

Many of their collectible cast iron frying pans are still out there.

Over the almost one hundred years that the Griswold Manufacturing Company was in operation it produced and patented numerous quality cast iron and cast aluminum articles for sale to the general public.

Many of these articles are now among some of the most collectible vintage products on the market today.

If you stumble across an old cast iron pan at a local flea market or garage sale, it might be worth the few moments that it takes to flip it over and examine any marks that it might have imprinted on its bottom.

You never know, you may be able to purchase that pan for a mere dollar or two and then suddenly find yourself owning an antique skillet worth hundreds or even thousands of dollars. It is definitely worth flipping that pan over to take a look at its trademark.

What the size numbers of a cast iron pan mean.

A few of the sizing numbers on the Griswold line of skillets are as follows:

#2 skillet had a 4 3/4 inch diameter pan bottom.

#3 skillet had a 5 1/4 inch diameter pan bottom.

#4 skillet had a 5 3/4 inch diameter pan bottom.

#5 skillet had a 6 3/4 inch diameter pan bottom.

#6 skillet had a 7 1/2 inch diameter pan bottom.

#7 skillet had a 8 1/4 inch diameter pan bottom.

#8 skillet had a 8 7/8 inch diameter pan bottom.

#9 skillet had a 9 1/2 inch diameter pan bottom.

#10 skillet had a 10 inch diameter pan bottom.

#11 skillet had a 10 7/8 inch diameter pan bottom.

#12 skillet had a 11 3/4 inch diameter pan bottom.

#13 skillet had a 12 3/4 inch diameter pan bottom.

#20 skillet had a 18 inch diameter pan bottom.

Cast iron is durable and can last for generations. Making it an ideal item to be handed down through the family.

Collectible Griswold cast iron skillet logos.

The Griswold company logo changed throughout the years and this is now very helpful in the identifying, and dating, of many of the pieces that now reside in collections around the world.

Logos of the Griswold company are also known to overlap and pieces can have more than just one logo on them. It is important to look for pieces produced in Erie, Pennsylvania as in later years some pieces were produced with the Griswold name but originated in other areas of the country.

Some of the collectable Griswold logos to watch for

Extremely rare is the Selden & Griswold logo used between 1865 and 1883.

Between 1865 and 1909 - Erie or "Erie".

Between 1874 and 1905 a spider and spider web design (this appears to be limited to certain pieces).

Between 1884 and 1912 Griswold's Erie.

Between 1884 and 1909 the word Erie contained within the shape of a diamond.

Between 1897 and 1940 Griswold Manufacturing Company within a large cross.

Between 1937 and 1957 the name Griswold using a small cross logo platform.

Cast iron has not changed much through the years. You can still find a wide variety of cast iron pots, pans, kettles, and roasters available for purchase. Cast iron has certainly not lost its desirability as cookware. It is as popular today as it was in yesteryear.

Photos are my own or are courtesy of Wikimedia.

Do you have cast iron pans in your home?

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    • Shoputopian profile image

      Karnel 6 months ago from Lower Mainland of BC

      I still use cast iron but then I live in our fifth wheel and find that they hold up the best on the propane burners, the outdoor fire and even on the Bbq

    • Redneck Lady Luck profile image
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      Lorelei Cohen 2 years ago from Canada

      @MelanieKaren: I like how they look hanging on a wall rack. They are indeed beautiful pots and pans to display. They make me feel like I am in a country home. I guess they remind me of growing up on the farm.

    • PromptWriter profile image

      Moe Wood 2 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      None, had one growing up that I loved. We have one of those burnerless stovetops now so we can't use them.

    • profile image

      BarbaraCasey 2 years ago

      Yes... but I'm keeping my eye out for a cast iron Swedish pancake pan like my grandmother used to have.

    • MelanieKaren profile image

      Melanie Wilcox 2 years ago from Pennsylvania, USA

      I love cast iron. It's my favorite to cook with. I have pieces from my grandmother, which means that cast iron pans last through generations and life-times. Plus, food tastes better :) In my opinion it is definitely worth it to have a cast iron collection, and they also look great.

    • Redneck Lady Luck profile image
      Author

      Lorelei Cohen 2 years ago from Canada

      @Tarra99: I have been eyeing up the waffle iron there. When it comes to cast iron age only makes them better.

    • Redneck Lady Luck profile image
      Author

      Lorelei Cohen 2 years ago from Canada

      @Brite-Ideas: They are my favorite pans and I just could not imagine not owning and cooking with good old heavy cast iron pots. They last virtually forever which is why they continue to be handed down in families.

    • profile image

      Tarra99 2 years ago

      I have about 3. Gave 1 to a neighbour. Wish I had more. Love that loaf pan on eBay....

    • Brite-Ideas profile image

      Barbara Tremblay Cipak 3 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      that was educational, I had no idea! I do love cooking with cast iron too

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