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Cottage Cheese – Favorited in Bodybuilding

Updated on January 27, 2017
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Roselyn has been a freelancer for 40 years. She had been a street vendor, a baker, and a cook—until she found her niche: writing. :)

Herbed Fresh Chevre Cheese (Photo Courtesy by stevendepolo from Flickr.com)
Herbed Fresh Chevre Cheese (Photo Courtesy by stevendepolo from Flickr.com)

In 1848, the term ‘cottage cheese’ was coined and used to refer to fresh cheese made in cottages (or homes) using excess milk left-over from butter making.

Who Eats Cottage Cheese?

Cottage cheese has mild taste, soft, and snowy white in color. It looks creamy and chunky, especially when curds are large. It is made from curdled fresh milk; then strained and seasoned with desired herbs. Although cottage cheese has a bland flavor, individuals with sensitive palates often find out it has an acquired taste, especially when eaten alone.

There are many ways of eating cottage cheese. Do not just ‘plop’ it on lettuce leaves or ‘slap’ it on a toast. With a bit of imagination, a bowl of sliced ripe bananas or assorted fruit bits will add exciting flavors to scoops of plain cottage cheese. Cottage cheese is added in lasagna, stuffed manicotti, jello salads, shake drink, and granola.

Because cottage cheese is packed with muscle-building protein and unbelievably low-fat, bodybuilders and weightlifters favorited cottage cheese as important ingredient to snacks, meals, and desserts. As a milk product, cottage cheese has high-calcium content. It is so healthy, more pregnant women preferred it over other calcium-rich foods.

Cottage Cheese with Bread (Kesong Puti with Pandesal) (Photo courtesy by ~MVI~ from Flickr.com)
Cottage Cheese with Bread (Kesong Puti with Pandesal) (Photo courtesy by ~MVI~ from Flickr.com)

Cottage cheese is traditionally drained and ‘not pressed’. Because whey is still present, curds are loose and have crumble-look. If sweet-tasting curd cheese is desired, the curd is washed. To add flavor, the cheese is mixed with pineapple or melon. Some producers include snipped chives or just leave some acid the cheese to give it tangy taste.

Of course, cottage cheese can be ‘pressed’ to make it look solid but still soft. It can be dry or moist. It is not aged so it should be consumed within ten days or less.

Queso Blanco (Photo courtesy by Secret Tenerife from Flickr.com)
Queso Blanco (Photo courtesy by Secret Tenerife from Flickr.com)

How to Make Cheese

Pressed Cottage Cheese Often Gets Different Names:

 
 
Farmer Cheese
also called ‘farmer’s cheese’ or ‘farmers’ cheese’; made from pressed cottage cheese for a longer period until it becomes dry and crumbly and solid
Fromage Frais
or “fresh cheese” that originated from Belgium and France (northern); also known as fromage blanc and maquee; pure fromage cheese is totally fat-free
Hoop Cheese
made from cottage cheese (with no salt and cream) and then pressed until dry and firm; also referred to as old-fashioned red rind cheese and country cheese
Kesong Puti
or “white cheese” that originated in the Philippines; made from fresh (unskimmed) carabao’s milk and rennet with salt to give flavor; soft and creamy kesong puti is often eaten as bread filling for breakfast
Paneer
non-melting paneer is unaged and acid-set farmer cheese, which is popular ingredient in South Asian cuisine
Pot Cheese
soft and crumbly cottage cheese; the Austrian ‘topfen’ (means pot cheese) is another term for Quark cheese; pot cheese is not easy to find in stores but it is the same with ricotta, cream cheese, and queso blanco
Quark Cheese
made from pressed cottage cheese; also known as curd cheese, tvarog (Slavik), twarog (Polish), or topfen (Austrian); in Germany, lean quark is for baking and cream quark is for desserts
Queso Blanco
or white cheese that originated in Spain; made from cottage cheese pressed to remove whey; similar to the Indian paneer and feta cheese (with mild taste); queso blanco gives creaminess to Mexican dishes like enchiladas and empanadas

Types of Cottage Cheese

 
 
Small-Curd
high acid content and produced without rennet
Large-Curd
low acid content and produced with rennet
 
 

Check the labels. Some manufacturers use skim milk to make non- and low-fat cottage cheese. Some add 4-8 percent cream to make creamed cottage cheese. Do not forget to check the expiry date, too. Store the cottage cheese in the coldest part of the refrigerator and consume it within 10 days after date of manufacture.

Handmade Cheese (Photo courtesy by RowdyKittens from Flickr.com)
Handmade Cheese (Photo courtesy by RowdyKittens from Flickr.com)

Making fresh cheese, part 1

Making fresh cheese, part 2

How to make cottage cheese and benefits of eating cottage cheese

What is Rennet?

Rennet – is a complex of enzymes, naturally produced by the body to enable digestion of milk. It contains ‘protease’ (proteolytic enzyme) that causes milk coagulation, which separates solids from liquids named respectively: curd and whey. Other sources of rennet are vegetables (fig, soybeans, nettles, thistles, mallow, Ground Ivy, and many more) and molds (like Rhizomucor miehei). Rennet helps shorten the process of cheesemaking and produces low-acid large-curd cheese.

Making Cottage Cheese

What is Curd?

Curd is the solid part of milk that appears after curdling (milk coagulation). Curds are the desired dairy product that is made to cottage cheese (and other types of cheese like quark). Casein, the proteins in milk, tangles into solid masses and produces cheese curds when acid is introduced into the milk and left to sour.

Homemade Cottage Cheese (Paneer)

What is Whey?

Whey (or milk plasma) is the liquid part of milk that get separated after curdling. It is another product made from cheese production. Whey is commercially used to produce brown cheeses, ricotta,and other food products. Whey contains protein, vitamins, minerals, lactose,and traces of fat.

Soft Lemon Kumquat (Photo courtesy by RBerteig from Flickr.com)
Soft Lemon Kumquat (Photo courtesy by RBerteig from Flickr.com)
Fromage (Photo courtesy by notfrancois from Flickr.com)
Fromage (Photo courtesy by notfrancois from Flickr.com)
More Fresh Cheese (Photo courtesy by BenjaminHill from Flickr.com)
More Fresh Cheese (Photo courtesy by BenjaminHill from Flickr.com)
Fresh Cheese in Istanbul (Photo courtesy by Papatia USA from Flickr.com)
Fresh Cheese in Istanbul (Photo courtesy by Papatia USA from Flickr.com)
Cheese of Akrotiri (Photo courtesy by Klearchos Kapoutsis from Flickr.com)
Cheese of Akrotiri (Photo courtesy by Klearchos Kapoutsis from Flickr.com)
More Fromage (Photo courtesy by La.blasco from Flickr.com)
More Fromage (Photo courtesy by La.blasco from Flickr.com)
Quark Cheese on Bread (Photo courtesy by erix! from Flickr.com)
Quark Cheese on Bread (Photo courtesy by erix! from Flickr.com)
Cheese for Breakfast (Photo courtesy by Sandy Austin from Flickr.com)
Cheese for Breakfast (Photo courtesy by Sandy Austin from Flickr.com)
Cottage Cheese with Vegetables (Photo courtesy by KitAy from Flickr.com)
Cottage Cheese with Vegetables (Photo courtesy by KitAy from Flickr.com)
Cottage Cheese on Tomato and Pasta (Photo courtesy by greckor from Flickr.com)
Cottage Cheese on Tomato and Pasta (Photo courtesy by greckor from Flickr.com)
Cottage Cheese with Fruits (Photo courtesy by cupcakes2 from Flickr.com)
Cottage Cheese with Fruits (Photo courtesy by cupcakes2 from Flickr.com)
Cottage Cheese with Banana (Photo courtesy by basykes from Flickr.com)
Cottage Cheese with Banana (Photo courtesy by basykes from Flickr.com)

Comments

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    • mandymoreno81 profile image

      mandymoreno81 

      6 years ago

      Great videos on how to make it, I tend to eat it alone or with soft fruits like berries and melon to get some energy for my workout routine.

    • queen cleopatra profile imageAUTHOR

      Roselyn Mendoza 

      8 years ago from Philippines

      Thanks for the comment, feyin :)

    • feyin profile image

      feyin 

      8 years ago from Sweden

      I eat it A lot.

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