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Create A Family Cookbook: An Interactive Heirloom

Updated on July 5, 2014

Building Family Memories One Recipe At A Time

"Hey, Aunt Lynn! What are some good recipes to make with a bag of boneless chicken breasts?" My brother's oldest son asked me this on Christmas Eve, explaining that the only thing he could think of was dousing a piece of chicken with teriyaki sauce, baking it and then eating it with lots of rice -- because whenever he makes rice the pan overflows. Quality and quantity issues were both in need of a solution.

My three sons and their male cousins stride toward independence, moving into their own apartments and foraging for their own meals. To their credit the lure of fast food and frozen food aisles dimmed quickly, and as coming home to dinner is not always an option they are trying their hands at some home-cooked meals. Often I get a text or a call asking from one of them how to make this dish or that dish. Up to Christmas Eve I have just reacted.

I own the rights to this photo of hungry boys -- er. young men!

Nephew Harry's request niggled at me for the last few days until I had an epiphany yesterday afternoon. Probably a lot later than many of you I thought, "Why don't I put some favorite recipes on a Google Doc and share them with the boys?" I use Google Docs all the time when writing and sharing information with colleagues and clients. It seems like the perfect platform for a cookbook filled with family

I have a couple of ideas to make this a bit more than just a cookbook. Right now read on and see where this family cookbook journey started.

Here Are The Recipes We Have Included So Far - Kid Tested -- Husband Approved --Even The Inlaws Ask For More!

Some of the Family Recipes are showing up as their own lenses! Visit a few and let us know what you think. Give us some ideas on what your family enjoys. Lets make sure everyone has something on the table they love to eat!

An Online Cookbook Not Your Thing? - Take a look at some of these options for Family Cookbooks you can hold in your hands -- and even turn the pages!

Although I like this option of doing a cookbook online (and linking to Squidoo) there is something to be said about paging through a cookbook. Here are some ideas for creating a traditional family cookbook and memoir.

Create Your Own Collected Recipes Cookbook - Brown & Copper
Create Your Own Collected Recipes Cookbook - Brown & Copper

This is an easy way to create a personal cookbook with a lot of flexibility. The three ring binder option allows easy additions and reorganizations.

 
Living Cookbook 2013
Living Cookbook 2013

Software with tons of options including nutritional analyses and a whole menu of ways to share and collect recipes.

 

Here are some of the people who eat my food! Not ALL boy food -- there will be some girl favs in the cookbook, too. - All pictures taken by and belonging to me.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Jumping off the cliffs at Burntside -- photo by LynnKKBack to our roots in Ely MN -- photo by LynnKKA game of cards before dinner--photo by LynnKKCousins! photo by LynnKK
Jumping off the cliffs at Burntside -- photo by LynnKK
Jumping off the cliffs at Burntside -- photo by LynnKK
Back to our roots in Ely MN -- photo by LynnKK
Back to our roots in Ely MN -- photo by LynnKK
A game of cards before dinner--photo by LynnKK
A game of cards before dinner--photo by LynnKK
Cousins! photo by LynnKK
Cousins! photo by LynnKK

What's For Dinner?

The "Daughter" Years

Back in the 1950s through early 1970s when I was growing up there really was no option to someone cooking the daily dinner for the family. My mom, dad, little brother and I munched through the typical mid-20th century menus. Meatloaf and Swiss steak. Baked chicken. Spaghetti made from the Kraft box mix -- pretty exotic at the time. Once in a great while we had takeout from a Chinese restaurant and the occasional pizza when mom and dad played bridge with friends or went to a party.

My mom worked during the school year so a lot of the time these meals were thrown together as she walked in the door late in the afternoon.She also liked things pretty plain -- no sauces or seasonings other than salt and pepper. I was interested in cooking and did a lot of prep work on the weekends and at holiday times -- peeling potatoes and carrots and learning how to make gravy at the tender age of about nine. Once I mastered gravy I began to start dinner for the family when I got home from school.

Usually I just followed the straightforward techniques of plopping chicken parts in a pan to go into the oven and rolling a few baking potatoes onto the oven rack after pricking them to let steam escape. My dad generally hated casseroles or hot dishes as we call them here in Minnesota. An exception was a ground beef, tomato soup, corn and elbow macaroni concoction that he called goulash. He also would put up with a rice and ground meat dish that mom made with tons of soy sauce and cream of mushroom soup, served always with iceberg lettuce in a homemade vinaigrette we just called Grandma's dressing.

Just like Mom's Classic Casserole Dish - The Original Multitasker

Mom scooped dad's goulash or her rice hot dish in here before baking. This dish was also used for the other meal in a dish dad would approve -- scalloped potatoes and ham.

Pyrex Smart Essentials 4-qt Mixing Bowl
Pyrex Smart Essentials 4-qt Mixing Bowl

I still have the one mom used. A one bowl wonder, she would mix all the ingredients in this and slide it into the oven.

 
Le Creuset Stoneware 1-1/4-Quart Rectangular Baker with Bonus 16-Ounce Rectangular Baker, Cherry
Le Creuset Stoneware 1-1/4-Quart Rectangular Baker with Bonus 16-Ounce Rectangular Baker, Cherry

Pretty and practical -- it is nice to have two sizes when you are not sure who is coming for dinner.

 

When my mother's mother would include a green salad on the table, this was the only dressing provided -- and the salad was tossed with it before the bowl got to the table. It was also a quick marinade for sliced cucumbers out of the garden in the summer. I know it flips the usual proportions of oil and vinegar, but my boys love the sour taste as do I.

  • Prep time: 5 min
  • Cook time: 30 min
  • Ready in: 35 min
  • Yields: 12

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup oil (your choice -- olive oil is healthier, but I use canola, too)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • several grinds of the pepper mill
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar or agave
  • a couple shakes of hot pepper sauce
  • Optional -- a teaspoon of finely minced onion

Instructions

  1. Combine in a jar and shake.
  2. Put in the refrigerator for at least half an hour to meld flavors.
  3. Just before adding to salad, shake again.
  4. Keep any leftovers in the refrigerator.
Cast your vote for Grandma's Dressing

An Elegant Vinaigrette Cruet - Much more refined than a jelly jar -- Grandma would approve

Although Grandma more often than not just mixed this dressing up in a jar or metal shaker, she loved glass dinnerware accessories and would have loved serving her dressing in this cruet.

Anchor Hocking 980R Presence Cruet With Stopper
Anchor Hocking 980R Presence Cruet With Stopper

Use proudly at the table and store securely in the refrigerator.

 
Prepworks by Progressive Dressing Salad Shaker - 2 Cup Capacity
Prepworks by Progressive Dressing Salad Shaker - 2 Cup Capacity

This is what I use now -- mixes the dressing easily and stores in a snap.

 
Norpro 2-Cup Measuring Shaker
Norpro 2-Cup Measuring Shaker

This could make dressing or a slurry for that gravy everyone is clamoring for.

 

Rebel In The Kitchen

My Pre-Teen and Teen Aged Cooking Rebellion

Did I mention I came of age -- and cooking age -- in the "question authority" 1960s? Once I was given some free rein in the kitchen salt and pepper moved over for a few new spices and I had some fun experimenting on my family. In the beginning my trusty Betty Crocker's Cookbook for Boys and Girls was at my elbow, and my parents and brother enjoyed fairly benign cookies and fudge. I then took on some forays into more highly seasoned main dishes like lasagna and beef stroganoff. This was cutting edge cuisine for my family.

One Christmas I asked for a copy of The Joy of Cooking and never looked back. I am sure many of my culinary escapades were more than a little hard to swallow, but my family knew I was onto something. Once I graduated from high school and went off to college my parents and brother may have retreated to baked chicken and pot roast, but they also had added some trendy dishes like beef fondue to the rotation. When I came home from school I would try out some new dishes as well.

A treasured blast from the past available at Amazon - Perfect for boys or girls -- test cooking done by kids themselves

When I received this cookbook in the 1960s I read it from cover to cover just as I do with cookbooks I buy and receive today.

Betty Crocker's Cook Book for Boys and Girls
Betty Crocker's Cook Book for Boys and Girls

I still have my copy from the 1960s, a little tattered and splattered, full of kid-friendly ideas for budding cooks.

 

The Joy Continues - A comprehensive source for everyone from the novice to the professional cook.

I loved my paperback copy of The Joy of Cooking to death -- literally. It fell apart after years of use, but I inherited my aunt's hardcover edition which I still turn to frequently.

The All New All Purpose: Joy of Cooking
The All New All Purpose: Joy of Cooking

Try this new format with cooking tips for the way we live and eat today.

 

A Person Could Make A Living Doing This

Cooking Escapades In My 20s

While pursuing my law degree I was looking for a part-time job to round out the clerkship I had with OSHA and the researching gig I had with a professor. I found a married couple who were looking for some housecleaning help and dinner on the table five nights a week. For a couple of years I tidied up and cooked for them, using the trendy cookbook of the late 70s, The New York Times: 60 Minute Gourmet. When I graduated their gift was a Cuisinart that I still use today.

I also spent about 18 months working as a cook in a theater/bar/bistro specializing in French rustic food. The Les Halles onion and potato dill soup I made daily are often served in my home, and the occasional evening I filled in as a bartender/barista gave me espresso drink making skills long before there was a coffee shop on every corner -- and the ability to make the sticky sweet tequila drinks popular in the disco age. Guess which skill I still use?

This was the time when I began reading cookbooks and food magazines like novels. I still do and I gather much inspiration from this practice. The newspaper's food section is the first page I turn to and I always get at least one cookbook per holiday. With four men who willingly eat whatever I put in front of them I can push the envelope far beyond my mother's baked chicken.

The Quick Cuisine Standard of the 1980s - French cooking in a (relative) hurry

This was the cookbook everyone had to include in their collection. Mine is still on the shelf ready for action.

The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet
The New York Times 60-Minute Gourmet

This is the one that earned me my Cuisinart.

 
Cooking with the 60-Minute Gourmet: 300 Rediscovered Recipes from Pierre Franey's Classic New York Times Column
Cooking with the 60-Minute Gourmet: 300 Rediscovered Recipes from Pierre Franey's Classic New York Times Column

Additional recipes that are fresh and delicious, and relatively quick to put on the table.

 

From Emerging Gourmet To Mommy

Hot Dogs Are For Weinies

Now do not get me wrong. Once my husband and I began our family in the 1990s more than one meal of hot dogs and macaroni and cheese was eaten. But my family also has enjoyed more sophisticated fare, and I pride myself on cooking almost everything from scratch. My husband, three sons and the rest of the family flatter me with compliments about my cooking skills and I have immersed myself in providing delicious and nutritious food for them -- sometimes at the same time.

My cooking background stretches back to my youth, and my enthusiasm for creating tasty and memorable meals continues. I would say it is about time I got down to sharing the best with my precious boys and other family members. We will see if a simple Google Doc provides the proper platform, and I have some glimmers of including a bit more than recipes. Sharing the means to provide a good meal with family is a beginning. Experiencing the making and eating is an additional jumping off point to embrace what breaking bread together over the years means to us all -- wish us luck as we attempt to capture all the magic.

Is this lens inspiring you to think about creating your own Family Cookbook? - Are you realizing you missed out on some recipes when you lost family members? Do

How likely are you to try to find treasured family recipes now that you have read this?

See results

Do you have some family recipes you really need to share? - Let us know if you have lost -- or found -- a treasured recipe.

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    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @AmyLOrr: I am pleased to hear your comments. I figure no matter what happens my kids will be able to see these recipes. Thanks for stopping by.

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      AmyLOrr 3 years ago

      This is such a wonderful idea. My mum has been keeping recipes for years and vowing to turn them into a cookbook for us kids. I will always love her scone recipe and her sponge pudding recipe :)

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @Arachnea: Thank you very much. I am plugging away, adding recipes. Beef Stroganoff may be the next one.

    • Arachnea profile image

      Tanya Jones 3 years ago from Texas USA

      Great idea! I'm into almost anything self-published. I actually have pecked at compiling my own recipes into a book. I've just not made much headway. One thing that is a plus is the availability of self-publishing options, like createspace Excellent lens.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @Heidi Vincent: Thank you so much. They are a pretty happy bunch when they are eating anyway!

    • Heidi Vincent profile image

      Heidi Vincent 3 years ago from GRENADA

      Nice idea and lots of happy looking faces who eat your food, LynnKK. Added to that, I think the Google doc idea will have then thinking fondly of their Aunty Lynn for years to come :)

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @Colin323: Let me know how it goes! You really do need to memorialize the recipes. I can still hear my grandmother's voice telling me what she did for some recipes. Unfortunately (or -- be completely honest -- sometimes fortunately) I did not write them all down.

    • profile image

      Colin323 3 years ago

      This is a great idea. I'm going to propose it this weekend. There are some great cooks in the family, including my 93 year mother-in-law, who has some old Yorkshire recipes tucked away in her head

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @StrongMay: It should work out well -- need to get moving on it! Thanks for your visit.

    • profile image

      StrongMay 3 years ago

      My family has been talking about making a family recipe book for years, but we have so many recipies we don't know where to start. My mom already made a cookbook of some of her recipies, and I took it with me to my university dorm. Putting recepies on a platform such as googledocs is a good idea!

    • rob-hemphill profile image

      Rob Hemphill 3 years ago from Ireland

      A good idea! I have loads of bits of paper stuffed into a cookbook with all the family's favorite recipes written by my mother and grandmother. I must follow your advice!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @AstroGremlin: Sounds fabulous! Does Amazon carry it? Thanks for dropping by.

    • AstroGremlin profile image

      AstroGremlin 3 years ago

      Klorg larvae with scrantilitron spice mix from the Epsilon Eridani system, old family favorite.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @MarleMac: Thanks for visiting. Your lenses are awesome--read a couple in the wee hours and will be reading more!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @susan369: I was pretty busy feeding the whole neighborhood -- cookies and kool aid anyway -- too. It was a good thing though. Thanks and check in for more boy-friendly food.

    • profile image

      susan369 3 years ago

      It must be quite a challenge feeding your brood complete with cousins! It's great that they're interested in cooking. Somehow, I can't see own son doing his own cooking when he's older, but you've inspired me to share some simple cooking tips with him in the hopes that he might fend for himself when he leaves home (not for another 10 years though!). At the moment, it's just "What's for dinner?"

    • MarleMac profile image

      MarleMac 3 years ago from South Africa

      I'm not a natural cook, my mom did EVERYTHING, but I'm starting to get into it, with a little bit of inspiration from Jamie Oliver's 15 minute meals - we get home so late after martial arts classes every evening, things have to go pretty fast and I don't have a big enough freezer to prepare things in advance. My son is also going to varsity this year, so he's been prepared to do the basics as he'll have to do his own meals! This is a cool idea and I might do something similar to inspire him every now and then as he lives on his cellphone! Thanks for sharing!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @ecogranny: As I add them to the Google doc I am linking them to the Squidoo lenses so family members can see the pics, etc. Thank you so much for visiting! I agree, I am usually adding pinches and shakes and this process is making me more methodical and also having a camera handy

    • ecogranny profile image

      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      Most of the cooks in my family, including me, cook on the fly--a little of this, a pinch of that, taste. Hmmmm. Maybe add a bit of this. So when I started publishing recipes here on Squidoo, I had to stop and measure everything before I added it to the pot. I'm getting better at that, but few of us have recipes written down. Still, I can think of a few family favorites that show up at every gathering, so I will begin asking for those recipes.

      Thank you for this idea of compiling recipes. One reason I began publishing mine on Squidoo was so my daughters could easily find them, but I realize I need to publish them in a more secure fashion as well.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image

      WriterJanis2 3 years ago

      This is a wonderful idea. I have some recipes that my kids love and I should put a collection together.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @anonymous: Come one, come all! Thanks so much for your kind words. I have had it in mind for a long time to share how I have been feeding my four boys -- three sons and their father. And of course all their friends, and their cousins. Sometimes I am the only woman in a dining room of 10 to 15 young and "uppity" to old and "crabby" men!

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      I'm inspired to follow YOUR cookbook! I want be family...:-) Love your stories and think it's great that the young men have an interest in the kitchen. My mother-in-law's family put together a binder cookbook and I do treasure it. I love it when my grown kids call and ask for recipes...I may need to get something online for them, or direct them to your cookbook!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @norma-holt: Thanks for your visit!

    • norma-holt profile image

      norma-holt 3 years ago

      Nice lens with some good concepts to consider. Well done

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @Zeross4: Hope that works out for you -- great legacy for your kids.

    • Zeross4 profile image

      Renee Dixon 3 years ago from Kentucky

      I think this is a wonderful idea! I have a few treasured family recipes that I already know I would add, including a great apple pie recipe- and even a delicious ambrosia!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @Johanna Eisler: Great ideas! Thanks for stopping by,

    • Johanna Eisler profile image

      Johanna Eisler 3 years ago

      It's always so tragic to lose a treasured family recipe! And what rejoicing when that recipe is found again! I decided to create a special binder for family recipes on Zazzle, and I put all my recipes there. Additionally, I keep a special recipe collection on my computer, where I'm less apt to lose them. For treasured recipes that are hand written by a loved one, I scan them to put them into the binder, as well as save the images to my computer. It's easy to share them this way, and I can order more copies of the binder for those in the family who also want to save these special memories and re-create the special dishes they have cherished all their lives.

      Good lens! Thank you!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @KimGiancaterino: Good luck with that. We really do come together as a family at the table, don't we?

    • KimGiancaterino profile image

      KimGiancaterino 3 years ago

      My niece requested family recipes at her recent bridal shower. I think we'll take the next step and start a family cookbook. My relatives are always posting recipes on Facebook.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @takkhisa: Thank you so much. I can see how she treasures her cookbook. This is a labor of love but we try to have a lot of fun, too.

    • takkhisa profile image

      Takkhis 3 years ago

      My mother has one! That's a precious thing for her. I love this lens, thanks for sharing :)

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @angelatvs: Thank you! I have enjoyed reading your lenses!

    • profile image

      angelatvs 3 years ago

      Fun and great ideas!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @tonyleather: Thanks. I am hoping it is going to be a lot of fun and create some lasting memories.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @katiecolette: I agree -- we use it on salad, cole slaw, single veggies.

    • katiecolette profile image

      katiecolette 3 years ago

      We make our own salad dressing sometimes and the recipe is very similar to your Grandma's salad dressing recipe. I love it! Tastes great and fewer calories than many of the store-bought dressings, plus its healthier and has no preservatives :)

    • profile image

      tonyleather 3 years ago

      Fascinating lens with some interesting suggestions. Sounds like a great idea!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      Wow--the beverage sounds like a "remedy" for calcium loss. :-) Fresh, homemade bread is the best and I have heard about Bakewell tart but have never made one. Thanks for stopping by!

    • RoadMonkey profile image

      RoadMonkey 3 years ago

      My mother had a recipe from her mother, who spent some time as a cook in an inn. It was an alcoholic beverage made from eggs and brandy, I think, where the eggs were marinated for several days in the brandy until the shells dissolved! My grandmother also made her own bread and her "Bakewell tart", made with a ground almond topping, was never on the table for long!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @Scarlettohairy: Thanks! It is a journey, isn't it?

    • Scarlettohairy profile image

      Peggy Hazelwood 3 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      Fun to read about your evolution as a cook!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @shadowfast7: Thank you!

    • shadowfast7 profile image

      Sure Temp 3 years ago

      such a great idea!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @favored: I know what you mean. I lost many a relative's recipe over the years as I failed to get it before they were no longer with us. I am hoping the technology helps. We will see. :-)

    • favored profile image

      Fay Favored 3 years ago from USA

      I actually tried getting the family to write down their great recipes, but it didn't work. They are so good they don't use recipes ... this is why I don't cook :)

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @KFRaizor: Thanks! That is the plan. Cross your fingers for me.

    • profile image

      KFRaizor 3 years ago

      This is vital when you think of all those "family recipes" that may be lost forever if they aren't written down. That you for the great idea!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @lesliesinclair: Thank you so much! I am hoping my family chimes in with recipes, too. I sense a tsunami! It is cold here in Minnesota today -- hope you are warm and enjoying the New Year.

    • lesliesinclair profile image

      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      You've got a marvelous idea to share and lots of readers will get a lot of pleasure from your recipes.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @Sundaycoffee: Thanks very much. I do love to cook, but I also do not mind if someone takes me out to dinner! I appreciate the support.

    • profile image

      Sundaycoffee 3 years ago

      You really do have a passion for cooking, and it seems that your sons have inherited it too.

      P.S. I love your sens of humor.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @esmonaco: Thank you for your kind words and encouragement. Stay warm!

    • esmonaco profile image

      Eugene Samuel Monaco 3 years ago from Lakewood New York

      What a wonderful story, Thanks for sharing this and Good Luck!!!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @Merrci: Thank you very much. I am thinking about the first set of recipes we are going to include right now and encouragement from kind folks like you is the inspiration I need to move forward. Happy New Year!

    • Merrci profile image

      Merry Citarella 3 years ago from Oregon's Southern Coast

      Very enjoyable lens! Thanks for sharing it.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @anonymous: Thank you! I have been thinking about doing it for years. Now with people watching maybe it will get done. :-)

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      anonymous 3 years ago

      Great idea, every one should make one of these. Great idea for a Christmas present

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @ologsinquito2: Agreed. The hardcover one I have has charming ribbon to keep my place and recipes to cook almost anything imaginable. Thanks for your visit. I spent Christmas Day eating off of my sister-in-law's Desert Rose china. Loved your lens.

    • ologsinquito2 profile image

      ologsinquito2 3 years ago

      The Joy of Cooking cookbook is a classic. Everybody should have one of these.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @VictoriaHolt: Thank you so much. I really love working with my kiddos with ASD -- you are so correct that they say and do the most amazing things. Glad to find another mom who is guiding the boys to cook their own dinner!

    • VictoriaHolt profile image

      VictoriaHolt 3 years ago

      Delightful! I made a super simple cookbook for my oldest son as he left to serve a mission in Las Vegas. These Mormon missionaries don't have time to cook, so the book had lots of simple things in it, like how to bake a potato in the microwave etc. I love your idea to share Google Docs! Brilliant! Thanks for all your kind comments on my ASD lenses!

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
      Author

      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @Virginia Allain: Great ideas. Thanks. I admit to being a little overwhelmed at the idea of a blog, but we will see. I teach special needs kids during the school year and hesitate to take on more than I can handle. This is all a learning curve for me.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Google Doc may just be the starting point for you or you could get a free wordpress blog. Who knows there may be others out there who would like to try your recipes.

      Later you can use a print-on-demand book publisher like blurb.com and have it slurp your blog into a book to give your sons a paperback copy of your recipes. I've used blurb for several family history books and they have software that will download a blog into their book software.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Google Doc may just be the starting point for you or you could get a free wordpress blog. Who knows there may be others out there who would like to try your recipes.

      Later you can use a print-on-demand book publisher like blurb.com and have it slurp your blog into a book to give your sons a paperback copy of your recipes. I've used blurb for several family history books and they have software that will download a blog into their book software.

    • Lynn Klobuchar profile image
      Author

      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      @SusanDeppner: Thank you so much!

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 3 years ago from Arkansas USA

      Love this!