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Easy homemade yogurt in a thermos

Updated on July 28, 2015
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A long-time whole grain baker, Kathryn discovered the thrill and ease of cooking with whole, fresh foods decades ago. Still chopping!

Pint of homemade yogurt with smaller jar of the "Mother"
Pint of homemade yogurt with smaller jar of the "Mother" | Source

Yogurt is a good source of protein, calcium, potassium and a host of other essential nutrients.

Stir up a batch of delicious homemade yogurt in minutes

If you love yogurt, you may have been thinking about making your own. Here's the good news: You don't need to buy a yogurt maker. You can make yogurt in a thermos. It's super easy!

It takes only minutes to stir up a batch of homemade yogurt and about eight to twelve hours to incubate in a good quality thermos, depending on how tangy you like it.

On this page, I show you, step by step, how to make yogurt from your own fresh, wholesome milk. No added preservatives. No gelatin. No unpronounceable ingredients.

Here you will also find a link for using your homemade yogurt to make your own Greek style yogurt, and if you think you might prefer a yogurt maker, I've reviewed the one I would buy if I weren't using a thermos.

Start with a good culture

If you are a seasoned yogurt maker and have saved out a half cup or so of your last batch (We call this The Mother), use it as long as it is no more than four days old.

If this is your first time making yogurt, or your mother is older, start with a good commercial culture. Yogourmet is my favorite, both for ease of use and for flavor.

Yogourmet includes the three living bacteria we Americans are most likely used to tasting in our yogurt: L. Bulgarius, S. Thermophilus, and L. Acidophilus. It has never failed to make a creamy, pudding-textured yogurt for me.

Note: The Yogourmet package directions suggest that you are using a yogurt maker. Once you've inoculated your milk according to the instructions on the package, follow my instructions for making it in a thermos.

If using the Mother

The mother culture must come from a live-culture batch, be no more than 4 days old and absolutely MUST be plain and unsweetened

Next, you will need a good thermos

These are the two I use, depending on how much yogurt I want to make and how quickly I expect to use it.

The first is my faithful Stanley wide-mouth, all-steel thermos. I've had this hunk since 1984. It's kept my coffee warm on ski trips that started at 4:00 in the morning and ended at dusk.

It's held steaming hot soup and chili hundreds of work days. And it's made gallons of yogurt over the years.


My Stanley holds 24 ounces, which is just right for the two of us most weeks, but when I know I'm going to need more yogurt, I use this 48-ounce Thermos, which is every bit as reliable as my Stanley for long hours.

It's larger capacity makes it an ideal road trip companion for the two of us, so we both get all the coffee we want in the morning. Later, we fill it with ice, water, and the juice of a couple of freshly squeezed lemons for a refreshing, no-calorie beverage to keep us going all afternoon.

Homemade yogurt, ready to eat
Homemade yogurt, ready to eat | Source

Homemade yogurt recipe

When you make yogurt, you want to assure that only the good, yogurt-making bacteria can grow in your milk, so it's important to start with sterilized equipment and freshly pasteurized milk.

It takes about 10 minutes to sterilize your utensils and another 5-10 to heat the milk to the pasteurization temperature recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Most of the remaining time is spent checking the cooling milk every few minutes until it reaches incubation temperature.

Mix the mother or culture with the milk, pour it in the thermos and set it in a warm place for 8-12 hours to incubate.

This entire process takes about 40 minutes from start to finish. Most of that time, you will be free to move about the kitchen, or perhaps write a HubPage.

You will need the following tools and containers

The tools and utensils needed to make yogurt in a thermos. Not shown: Saucepan and storage jars.
The tools and utensils needed to make yogurt in a thermos. Not shown: Saucepan and storage jars. | Source

Can eating yogurt help us lose weight?

According to a Harvard study cited by U.S. News and World Report, people who eat one serving of yogurt every day lost about one pound every four years.

These are the tools you need to make and incubate your yogurt.

  • Tablespoon measuring spoon
  • Wire whisk
  • Long-handled wooden spoon
  • One- or two-cup measuring cup
  • Large mixing bowl, preferably with a pour spout, for cooling the milk
  • Two-quart saucepan
  • Instant thermometer
  • High quality, well-insulated thermos
  • Wide-mouth glass jar(s) sufficient to hold all but 1/4-1/2 C of the yogurt
  • Small jar to hold 1/4-1/2 C of the yogurt (This will become your new mother)

If your kitchen is cool, you will also need either an oven with a light or fresh towels and a strong tie with which to wrap your thermos to keep it warm during the incubation time.

Total time to inoculate the milk, including cool-down time

  • Prep time: 15 min
  • Cook time: 25 min
  • Ready in: 40 min
  • Yields: 2 servings per cup of milk

Ingredients

  • Milk, Enough to fill your thermos, minus one T per cup
  • Yogurt Mother, 1 T per cup of milk; Must be no older than four days
  • Commercial yogurt culture, Use if no mother available; Adjust package ratio to milk quantity
Incubating thermos in oven with light turned on for warmth during incubation period
Incubating thermos in oven with light turned on for warmth during incubation period | Source

Instructions:

1. If you don't need your oven in the next 8-12 hours, you can incubate your yogurt in the oven. Turn on the oven light and keep the door closed until you are ready to pop in the thermos.

The oven light will heat the oven just slightly and keep it at an ambient temperature while your yogurt is incubating.

Thermos wrapped and bound in insulating towels
Thermos wrapped and bound in insulating towels | Source

2. Alternatively, you can wrap your filled thermos in towels and place it in an out-of-the-way spot where it won't be disturbed, such as on top of the refrigerator.

If using this method, lay out your towels and a binding cord so they are ready when your yogurt mixture is ready to incubate.

Sterilizing the utensils and kettle I use to heat the milk
Sterilizing the utensils and kettle I use to heat the milk | Source

3. Sterilize your utensils and all containers.

Yogurt is milk that has been inoculated with "friendly" bacteria--microbes our digestive tract needs to be healthy.

To help the good bacteria, and to assure that bad bacteria don't get a toe-hold, it is important to take a few minutes to prepare your work surface and sterilize your utensils and containers, including the thermos and its lids.

All my utensils and containers sterilized and ready to go
All my utensils and containers sterilized and ready to go | Source

4. Lay out your sterilized utensils and containers on a clean kitchen towel so all is at the ready.

I've sterilized the glass measuring cups and thermos by carefully pouring boiling water in them. I let the water cool a bit before I pour it off, to minimize risk of scalding myself, since my hands are somewhat arthritic these days.

Yogourmet box cover
Yogourmet box cover | Source

5. If your incubating medium is a commercial culture, prepare it now, according to the manufacturer's directions. Set aside.

Yogurt mother in glass Fido jar
Yogurt mother in glass Fido jar | Source

6. If your incubating medium is the mother from a previous batch, measure the mother into the small measuring cup, one tablespoon mother per cup of milk.

The mother should be no more than four days old.

Measuring the milk in the thermos--I've left room for 3 tablespoons mother
Measuring the milk in the thermos--I've left room for 3 tablespoons mother | Source

7. Measure the milk into the sterilized thermos, leaving room for 1 tablespoon mother per cup of milk.

Pour the measured milk into the empty, sterilized sauce pan.

Uncapped thermos filled with boiling water
Uncapped thermos filled with boiling water | Source

8. Re-sterilize the thermos with boiling water and leave in the uncapped thermos to keep the interior warm while you heat the milk.

The milk has reached 165 degrees
The milk has reached 165 degrees | Source

9. Over medium heat, per USDA guidelines, bring the milk to 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove from heat and pour into the large pitcher.

To speed cooling, you can set the pitcher in a large bowl. Carefully add cool water to the bowl without getting any in the pitcher.

Cooling the milk to between 108 and 110 degrees
Cooling the milk to between 108 and 110 degrees | Source

10. Let cool to no less than 108 degrees and no more than 110 degrees.

This is the range that is just right for incubating yogurt. If the milk is warmer when you add the culture, the good bacteria may die. If it is cooler, they may not grow fast enough to make yogurt.

Lightly whisking a small amount of warm milk with the culture
Lightly whisking a small amount of warm milk with the culture | Source

11. Pour 1/2 cup of the just-right milk into the small measuring cup containing the Mother culture or the commercial culture, whichever you are using. Whisk lightly to combine. Do not beat to a froth.

Whisking the warmed culture and milk into the rest of the milk
Whisking the warmed culture and milk into the rest of the milk | Source

12. Whisk the inoculated culture into the large pitcher of milk. Whisk again, to combine and pour into your thermos. Cap immediately.

The thermos filled with inoculated milk, resting for 8-12 hours in the oven with the light turned on for added warmth
The thermos filled with inoculated milk, resting for 8-12 hours in the oven with the light turned on for added warmth | Source

13. If you don't need your oven in the next eight to twelve hours, place the thermos in the oven with the oven light on for extra warmth. You may be surprised how warm your thermos is when you remove it from the oven at the end of the incubation period.

If you do plan on using the oven, wrap your thermos in towels and bind with a cord. Set in a warm, out of the way place, such as on top of your refrigerator, and allow to incubate undisturbed for 8-12 hours.

Perfect yogurt, creamy and ready to spoon into jars and refrigerate
Perfect yogurt, creamy and ready to spoon into jars and refrigerate | Source

14. Incubate your yogurt undisturbed for 8-12 hours. Less time gives you a thinner, more pourable yogurt which is also milder in taste. More time yields a thicker yogurt and a more tangy taste. That's how we like ours.

Note: The yogurt in my thermos appears yellow because I use whole milk from pasture-fed cows. This dairy does not homogenize the milk, so the cream rises to the top in the bottle as well as in the yogurt. That thin layer of cream on top is a rich, buttery yellow and makes our yogurt all the more creamy and delicious.

A full pint of yogurt, plus another six ounces set aside as the mother
A full pint of yogurt, plus another six ounces set aside as the mother | Source

15. Ladle your yogurt into sterilized jars, reserving 1 tablespoon per cup of milk for your next batch. This will be your Mother.

Label the mother, if need be, to keep hungry hands from eating it!

If you are as busy as we are and tend to forget which day you made your last batch, add the date to the label and set a reminder on your calendar.

Oh, and if you're like me, you may want to dish up a couple of ounces right away for yourself. It's so good when it's fresh and still warm! I can't not taste it!

That's why my 24 ounces ends up being only 22 ounces, as you see here.



Rate this yogurt-making method

5 stars from 1 rating of How to make yogurt in a thermos

Soy, whole milk, low-fat, no-fat, raw, organic - What's in your yogurt?

Yogurt can be cultured from all types of milk, even soy. What's your favorite?

What is the basic ingredient in your favorite yogurt?

See results
Quart of raw milk from Claravale Farm
Quart of raw milk from Claravale Farm | Source

Did you say raw milk yogurt?

If you want to make raw milk yogurt, do your research first.

To assure any harmful bacteria are killed, the federal government states raw milk MUST be pasteurized by heating to 165 degrees F, the same temperature they recommend when making yogurt with pasteurized milk.

MotherLinda, however, shares a different opinion in To Heat or Not to Heat: A Yogurt Question at the Weston Price Foundation web site.

Wherever you stand on this issue, take time to research thoroughly before making a decision for you and your family.

How to culture soy milk or goat's milk

One of the most frequent questions I am asked is, will this recipe work with soy or goat's milk. I have not tried either, but lots of other bloggers have. Here are a few links detailing some of their methods.

Since the methodology appears to be the same no matter the type of milk used, I suspect one could as easily culture goat's milk or soy milk in a thermos, following the instructions above.

What makes yogurt, well, yogurt?

Fermentation, Baby!

Yogurt thickens and turns tangy because good bacteria multiply and get fat on the milk sugars. It ferments, just like beer or bread. To thrive and grow, the bacteria need warmth--not too much, just enough. Too much heat will kill them. Too cool, and they hibernate.

If the temperature and other conditions are just right, the good bacteria that make healthy, living yogurt will grow rapidly. Harmful bacteria will be crowded out.

For an interesting article on fermentation, including the yogurt process, see Fermentation: When food goes bad but stays good." NPR interviews Sandor Katz, author of The Science and Art of Fermentation.

Euro Cuisine YM100 Automatic Yogurt Maker
Euro Cuisine YM100 Automatic Yogurt Maker

The Euro Cuisine YM80 turns itself off when the yogurt is ready. You can set it before you go to sleep at night, or before you run out the door in the morning, and when you return, your freshly cultured yogurt is ready to chill in the refrigerator.

 

If you'd rather use a yogurt maker - Euro Cuisine Automatic Yogurt Maker is my pick

First of all, it makes the yogurt directly into perfect serving-size glass jars. You don't have to worry about leaching harmful chemicals into your yogurt while it incubates and during storage.

Plus, I like the small footprint. It would fit easily on the countertop in my space-challenged apartment kitchen.

Another big plus: You can purchase a second set of jars, so if your family sucks up the yogurt the minute it's ready, as mine often does, you've got another batch of jars ready to go.

If you need more yogurt in a single batch

Euro Cuisine has you covered. If your family goes through yogurt like mine did when we were all much younger and there were more of us at home, you'll put this second tier to good use.

Add the jars and incubate twice as much yogurt in the same amount of time.

Thank you for visiting this page

Have you made yogurt prior to reading this page? Willing to give this method a try? I'd like to hear from you, especially if you try it, and I do hope you'll pass a link to this page along to your friends and family members you think would love to try this recipe.

© 2011 Kathryn Grace

Your questions and comments are welcome.

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    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      @TapIn2U: Indeed you can! Thank you.

    • TapIn2U profile image

      TapIn2U 2 years ago

      Yum and healthy! Now I can have it at home whenever I want it. Fantastic lens! Sundae ;-)

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      @Faye Rutledge: Please do let me know whether you try it, and if you have any problems with it, give me a shout.

    • Faye Rutledge profile image

      Faye Rutledge 2 years ago from Concord VA

      I eat yogurt every day, but I've never made my own. Thanks for the great instructions, I might give it a try!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @anonymous: Thank you.

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      anonymous 3 years ago

      What can resist got those too? I like them. Great lenses!

    • blestman lm profile image

      blestman lm 3 years ago

      Didn't know making yogurt could be this easy. Thanks for a great lens

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @MsBertie: Yes, I have used Nancy's Nonfat Organic Plain Yogurt, widely available on the West Coast and in the Western mountain states as a starter. I have also used St. Benoit Organic Plain Yogurt, which I believe is available only in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am sure there are local organic producers almost anywhere, and local is always best. Just be sure to use fresh yogurt that is just opened and that has no additives. It must have live cultures and must not contain pectin or other thickening agents.

    • MsBertie profile image

      MsBertie 3 years ago

      I use to own a yogurt maker, but it got lost when I moved. I love the idea of the thermos and I have one. Will try this soon. Can you use organic plain store bought yogurt as starter?

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @RoadMonkey: You're welcome. If you decide to try it, let me know how you like it, will you please?

    • RoadMonkey profile image

      RoadMonkey 3 years ago

      Never made my own yogurt but I love it and it sounds easy to do. Geat information and useful and fantastic explanations. Thanks

    • Halloween Cosplay profile image

      Halloween Cosplay 3 years ago

      I'd like to try making it. Seems like a good snack and alternative to fast food.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Johanna Eisler: Thank you. If you decide to take it up again and try the thermos method, I'd love to know how it goes.

    • Johanna Eisler profile image

      Johanna Eisler 3 years ago

      I used to make my own yogurt years ago, and I remember how easy it was. I can't remember why I stopped, lol! Thank you for the reminder! Excellent lens with easy-to-follow directions!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @chrisilouwho: Should you decide to give it a try, the safest method for a timid beginner is to purchase the yogurt starter I recommend above and go from there. Be sure to use a thermometer to check that your milk is at incubating temperature before adding the starter and you should have no problems. Thank you for visiting.

    • chrisilouwho profile image

      chrisilouwho 3 years ago

      This is interesting, not sure I'm brave enough to try making it on my own though.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @ItayaLightbourne: Always glad to find another homemade yogurt fan here on Squidoo. Thank you for stopping by, and for sharing your Stevia addition.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Jess Martell: Thank you for visiting.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @MelanieKaren: I used to help my grandmother churn butter in her old-fashioned churn. That was great fun. But I've never made sour cream. When you do, I hope you build a lens on it so we can all learn from you. Thank you for your encouraging comment.

    • ItayaLightbourne profile image

      Itaya Lightbourne 3 years ago from Topeka, KS

      I did make my own yogurt for a while and I loved it! It was amazing how easy it was to make and how great it tasted. I added a few drops of liquid Stevia extract to mine to sweeten. It didn't take much. :)

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @evawrites1: You're welcome, and I'm glad to hear that you make vegan yogurt in a thermos because other people have asked about that. Do you use soy? Or almond milk? What works best?

    • evawrites1 profile image

      evawrites1 3 years ago

      I love vegan yoghurt and for a while I was making in in a Thermos too... but lately I had forgotten about it. Thanks for reminding me!

    • Jess Martell profile image

      Jess Martell 3 years ago

      This is awesome. I love yogurt. Sweet lens :)

    • MelanieKaren profile image

      Melanie Wilcox 3 years ago from Pennsylvania, USA

      I love this lens. I've been to a few times now, and I'm really excited to make yogurt. I've wanted to for a while, and now, I have an expert to come to. I'm so excited to begin making butter, sour cream, cheeses, soaps, and yogurt. I will be soooooo happy once I master these. -talk about being self-sufficient :)

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Lynn Klobuchar: You're welcome.

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      Lynn Klobuchar 3 years ago from Minneapolis, Minnesota

      I love yogurt and may give this a try. Thanks for the step by step.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @sha-ron: I am always thrilled to find another DYI-yogurt maker. I will look for your article here on Squidoo. When I was much younger, I too added non-instant powdered milk to my yogurt. We prefer it thinner and lighter now, so I don't need that extra step. Don't you love the flexibility that making our own gives? We can make it just the way we like it.

    • sha-ron profile image

      sha-ron 3 years ago

      I love making my own fresh home made yogurt. In fact I also wrote an article about making it. Like you I agree at least you know what is in it. No chemicals etc. I also use powdered milk mixed in my milk which makes it more creamy. Thanks great lens

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Pipa-bipa: It really is easy to do, especially if you use fresh, live cultures the first time and set aside some "mother" for subsequent batches. Do contact me if you have any questions, and thank you for stopping by.

    • Pipa-bipa profile image

      Pipa-bipa 3 years ago

      Making yogurt in a thermos seems to be a wonderful idea, especially for me :) I've always wanted to start making one at home but did not want to stuff my small kitchen with another device. Using thermos is a great idea indeed. Must try it!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @ChristyZ: It certainly tastes better to me, and my family members prefer it too. Thank you so much for stopping by!

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      ChristyZ 3 years ago

      I love yogurt, I've never tried making my own, but I imagine it would taste better than the store bought version and of course it would be much healthier!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Lady Lorelei: You know, we love simple suppers like that at our house, too. Thank you for taking the time to read and comment on my lens, even when you don't expect to make your own yogurt. I feel blessed.

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      Lorelei Cohen 3 years ago from Canada

      This is a very opportune article. I am having yogurt with added whey and banana bread for my supper. I am not sure I would ever make my own yogurt but it is handy to know that it is not all that difficult.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @TanoCalvenoa: Thank you. I hope you find making your own yogurt as easy and fun as I do.

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      TanoCalvenoa 3 years ago

      What a great page, I'm going to save this and refer to it to try to make my own. Cool.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @gottaloveit2: Do let me know how it works for you, and don't hesitate to contact me here or by using the contact button, if you have questions.

    • gottaloveit2 profile image

      gottaloveit2 3 years ago

      What a great idea! I love that I also won't have those little plastic yogurt tubs around (or in my car - they're great to store little dog treats in the dashbox), or in my bedroom (store bobbypins), or in my basement...you get the idea. I like a real tangy yogurt so will leave it for longer and see what happens. Thanks so much. What a great article.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Adventuretravels: That's a new one on me. I'd like to see a study that proves yogurt reduces body fat. Wouldn't that be something?

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      Giovanna Sanguinetti 3 years ago from London UK

      Nice lens. I used to do this too. I'd forgotten - so thanks for reminding me. I've heard that yoghurt helps you keep your weight down because it takes away fat in your body - is that the case?

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @David Stone1: You are welcome. I had a tyrannosaurus companion myself back in those days. : )

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      David Stone 3 years ago from New York City

      I used to make my own yogurt when I was in my twenties and had a pterodactyl for a pet. I still have yogurt every day, mixed with an organic, whole grain cereal for breakfast. I buy plain yogurt, no junk added; so, this may be a great alternative for me to consider. Great information, and I appreciate it. Thanks.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Erin Mellor: Always glad to meet another person who makes her own yogurt. Totally agree with you about all those ingredients. Who needs them!

    • Erin Mellor profile image

      Erin Mellor 3 years ago from Europe

      I make my own because I like to know what's in food, some brands of fruit yogurt can barely fit all the ingredients on the side of the pot there are so many and they're so complicated.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Susan Zutautas: Start simple, and keep in mind that commercial yogurts are thickened with gelatin. Natural yogurt is not so jello-like. Let me know how it goes, and thank you for visiting.

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      Susan Zutautas 3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      I've never thought about making my own yogurt. This is something I'll to try.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @tonyleather: You're welcome. Let me know if you give it a try, won't you please?

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      tonyleather 3 years ago

      Ihad no idea this was possible! Very educational Lens. thanks a lot!

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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @SheGetsCreative: Thanks so much!

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      Angela F 3 years ago from Seattle, WA

      Super clever - liked and pinned!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Scarlettohairy: Thank you for stopping by, Scarlett, and taking the time to leave a note.

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      Peggy Hazelwood 3 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      Very interesting! It makes sense to make your own. I don't eat enough though so doubt if I'll try this. Love your thorough instructions!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @smine27: It's easy! You make such wonderful lenses. Let me know if this method turns out to be easy enough to get you going with homemade yogurt again. I'm always open for suggestions as well.

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      Thank you for sharing this. At one time I did make my own yogurt but have gotten out of the habit. This lens reminded me why I should start doing it again. By the way, thank you so much for always giving me such nice comments on my lenses. You always make my day Grace. :)

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Joanna14: Lucky, lucky you! Hang onto it! I rue the day I gave away my old yogurt maker, thinking I would never again need to make that much yogurt at one time.

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      KathyZ1 3 years ago

      Great lens, enjoy it.

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      Christine Hulme 3 years ago from SE Kent, England

      I make mine in my faithful old yoghurt maker that still works after 30 years, but sometimes it gets stuck at the back of the cupboard. Thanks for reminding me to make it again. Good lens!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @KathyZ1: You're welcome, Kathy. Thanks for stopping by.

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      KathyZ1 3 years ago

      Great lens. Thanks for your sharing.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Two Crafty Paws: Soured milk. I haven't tasted that since I was a kid. I assume you start with raw milk, since pasteurized has all the good enzymes removed?

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      Two Crafty Paws 3 years ago

      I haven't but we've been thinking about making it at home for a while. We're on a mission to become as self efficient as possible (we don't have farm animals but we do have access to basic home produce) and to use as much home grown and home made as possible. The difference in taste is enormous!

      Although we never made yoghurt we did and still do soured milk. Yum!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @TreasuresBrenda: Do let me know if you give it a try, and if you have any problems with it, give me a shout.

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      Treasures By Brenda 3 years ago from Canada

      I've had homemade yogurt and I know how good it is but I've never made it. This looks like a great technique.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @MelRootsNWrites: Oh yes, the savings are wonderful! Even when I pay $5+/quart for organic raw milk, which I do when I'm lucky enough to get it, I save over the $7-8 I usually have to pay, depending on location, for St. Benoit, which is what we like when we don't have homemade on hand.

      So glad the oven method is working for you, and I think you're right about the warmer weather being a factor. Plenty of days in the East Bay, you could probably make yogurt without any additional heat, yes?

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      Melody Lassalle 3 years ago from California

      @ecogranny: I live on the other side of the bay. Maybe our weather is a little more suitable to the oven method. I've made two batches now. The second one I let incubate for 9 hours (instead of 7). It was much more flavorful. I'm pretty pleased with the results. This is certainly much cheaper than the stuff I was buying!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @MelRootsNWrites: Oh, that is good news. Thank you for telling me. People are always asking me about making yogurt with soy milk, and I've never tried it.

      Glad the oven method worked for you. Every time I've attempted it, I've failed completely--totally runny. I've tried half a dozen oven methods, and none has worked. I suspect San Francisco is just too cold most of the time for a pilot light to produce enough heat to incubate the yogurt.

      The important thing is to find an easy way that works in your home so you can enjoy the delicious flavor of homemade, and you did!

    • MelRootsNWrites profile image

      Melody Lassalle 3 years ago from California

      @ecogranny: Thanks for the tips! I made my first jar today using Silk Unsweetened Soy Milk. I used the oven method of incubation. It looks good. Just a little separation at the top. And, I must say it smells pretty good too. I can't wait to try it tomorrow.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @MelRootsNWrites: Good question. I never strain the yogurt unless I want a Greek yogurt or a cream cheese consistency. (See the link further above to my Greek-style Yogurt recipe.)

      Some people strain their yogurt because they are used to the store-bought varieties that are thickened with gelatin. Homemade yogurt is usually a little thinner. If you want yogurt more with more of a gelatin consistency, you may want to strain it. But please, don't throw out the whey. On my Greek-style yogurt page, you'll find several ways to make the most of your whey and get those nutrients into your body where they can do a lot of good.

    • MelRootsNWrites profile image

      Melody Lassalle 3 years ago from California

      I am going to attempt to make soy yogurt as the unsweetened plain that I buy is not available anymore. It seems pretty easy to make as long as you are patient. I was curious. Do you strain your yogurt before you put it in the fridge? I saw one set of instructions that said you had to strain it. Thanks for the great instructions!

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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @MBurgess: You pinned it? Thank you so much!

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      Maria Burgess 3 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      Already pinned! Thanks for writing this. It looks easy enough to do! I have been making my own mixes but not the yogurt itself. Great lens!

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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Cynthia Haltom: Oh what a good idea! The temperature can be just about right on a sunny day!

    • Cynthia Haltom profile image

      Cynthia Haltom 3 years ago from Diamondhead

      When my kids were small I used to make it on the front seat of my warm car.

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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @MelaniePaige13: You are welcome. I'd love to hear how it turns out.

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      Melanie Paige 3 years ago from Adelaide, South Australia

      I have to try this! I love yogurt. I actually had a craving for about a week ago and I don't think it's really gone away, haha. Thanks for sharing this recipe :)

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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @Jogalog: If you do, I'd love to hear whether the superior taste changes your mind.

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      Jogalog 3 years ago

      I can't imagine making my own yoghurt all the time but I would definitely try it as a one-off for an experiment.

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      LUMOSE 3 years ago

      I love yogurt. I have to try this one day.

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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @LisaAuch1: Thanks for the visit, Lisa, and do et me know how it turns out, won't you?

    • LisaAuch1 profile image

      Lisa Auch 3 years ago from Scotland

      wow i Love my yogurt, I so need to try this

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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @blessedmomto7: Do you have a lens on your crockpot method? Mine cooks on too high heat, so I've never tried it.

    • Girlwiththorns profile image

      Girlwiththorns 3 years ago

      Love making my own yoghurt.

    • blessedmomto7 profile image

      blessedmomto7 3 years ago

      I've made yogurt in my crockpot, but never tried your method.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @kmhrsn: My mother likes to remind me that in the old days, before electricity, her relatives cultured yogurt in a crock on the back of the wood-fired stove or in the warming oven above. The milk and cream set there for days, grabbing the good bacilli from the air, till it "clabbered."

      Yes, you can make yogurt from bought yogurt, as long as it is the kind that has live bacilli in it. Read the label to assure the milk was pasteurized BEFORE they added the live cultures. Also, watch for pectin or other thickening agents. Very likely the commercial yogurt that thickens that way doesn't have enough good live bacteria to culture yogurt.

      Since we never know for sure how old the yogurt is or how much live bacteria it contains, making a new batch with bought yogurt as a starter can be iffy, especially with the more commercial brands.

      Here in San Francisco, we get a wonderful locally-made yogurt from St. Benoit. It tastes delicious, and I almost always use a bit of it to start a new mother batch, but I do get more consistent results when I use the Yogurmet starter.

    • kmhrsn profile image

      kmhrsn 3 years ago

      @ecogranny: A question: Hubby wants to know why you can't just use some purchased yogurt as the starter.

      And a story: Hubby has a Turkish family that he cleans for (that's his business), and one day they were making yogurt. They said, "Oh, it's easy!" After about the 16th step (he said), his eyes glazed over. Apparently, they just wrap a towel around it and let it culture in the pot they prepared it in. Your way sounds better to me. :-)

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      @kmhrsn: Do let me know how it goes, and don't hesitate to contact me if you have questions. I love turning people on to homemade yogurt.

    • kmhrsn profile image

      kmhrsn 3 years ago

      This is so exciting! I totally plan on trying this and sharing it. Wow!

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 4 years ago from Central Florida

      I haven't made my own yogurt, but get frustrated with the limited choices of flavors in the local Walmart. Good point, too, about all those little plastic cups.

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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @ChefWilliam: Thank you, and what a compliment! Hope you'll come back and share your experience with all of us.

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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @Leigh Stratton: If you give it a try, do come back and let me know how it goes. I'm always happy to answer questions if you run into a snag.

    • Leigh Stratton profile image

      Leigh Stratton 4 years ago

      I've always wanted to try and make my own yogurt to go with my Indian food; after reading this lens, I think I might be able to successfully make my own now!

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      ChefWilliam 4 years ago

      This is wonderful. Just last week my wife and I were talking about making our own yogurt. Now we have all the information we need to get started. great lens

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @WordChipper: You're welcome. Should you decide to try it, do come back and let me know how it turns out for you.

    • WordChipper profile image

      WordChipper 4 years ago

      I didn't know you could do this - thank you. We eat yogurt all the time and I don't like the little plastic containers either.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @cal17mom: So true, and so glad to hear from another homemade yogurt fan.

    • cal17mom profile image

      cal17mom 4 years ago

      I have the Dash Yogurt Maker,and I love it! There is no match for the tangy goodness of fresh yogurt.

    • flinnie lm profile image

      Gloria Freeman 4 years ago from Alabama USA

      Hi I liked this lens before, I am back for a second read.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I've never thought about making yogurt at home. This is an interesting lens. Thanks for sharing it with us.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have tried making my own yogurt but I would like to give this method a try too.

    • Judith Nazarewicz profile image

      Judith Nazarewicz 4 years ago from Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

      What a great lens! I need to start making yogurt more often.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @RhondaAlbom: No problem. Thank you for visiting and sharing a bit of your experience. Always happy to hear from folks who are living the life.

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      Rhonda Albom 4 years ago from New Zealand

      Oops, left my comment in wrong spot after I scrolled up to leave the blessing. :)

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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @sheilamarie78: Thank you for that compliment. Made my day!

    • sheilamarie78 profile image

      sheilamarie78 4 years ago

      I will have to try making yogurt again. Your directions are so clear and easy to follow.

    • victoriahaneveer profile image

      victoriahaneveer 4 years ago

      I wouldn't bother. It's easier to buy.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Yes, I would love to make my own yogurt.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      very nice recipe...delicious !

    • spids1 profile image

      spids1 4 years ago

      Great lens very well written.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @TheBLU26: Do come back and let me know how it turns out for you. I'd be happy to answer any questions you have.

    • TheBLU26 profile image

      TheBLU26 4 years ago

      I have friends who make their own yogurt and it's delicious! Thank you for the recipes, I'm going to try my own now!

    • KimGiancaterino profile image

      KimGiancaterino 4 years ago

      This is another of those things I wish there was more time for. Happily, there are many wonderful Armenian stores in our neighborhood where quality yogurt is cheap and plentiful. We eat it every day.

    • learningpianousa profile image

      learningpianousa 4 years ago

      Awesome, I'll have to try this and it sounds so easy to do! Thanks for this lens.

    • eccles1 profile image

      eccles1 4 years ago

      I love to try !

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @yayas: Lovely to find this note at the end of a long weekend. Thank you so much! I enjoy your pages too.

    • yayas profile image

      yayas 4 years ago

      I really enjoy your pages. You have so many great lessons to teach 'bout things that are important. Thank you for visiting my pages an' sharing your thoughts. Much appreciated.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @Lee Hansen: Oh, that is such good news! Thank you for letting me know. Made my day!

    • Lee Hansen profile image

      Lee Hansen 4 years ago from Vermont

      Popped back over here to bless and let you know my daughter is making yogurt for the family now. Lucky me!

    • LynetteBell profile image

      LynetteBell 4 years ago from Christchurch, New Zealand

      It's years since I made my own yoghurt. Must give it a try again. Thanks for the information

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I will think about it. Thanks for the instructions.

    • pinkrenegade lm profile image

      pinkrenegade lm 4 years ago

      I haven't tried making one. Thanks for the recipe. I will try to make my own yogurt.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @Melissa Miotke: Let me know how it turns out, or if you have any questions. It's a lot of fun, actually, to make your own yogurt.

    • Melissa Miotke profile image

      Melissa Miotke 4 years ago from Arizona

      I will give it a try. Cool idea!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @anonymous: You're welcome. Do please let me know how your yogurt turns out.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      So far I only tried making a kefir.. I never thought of making yogurt before. I think that I'll try your metode, since it is really nicely explained. Thank you for sharing.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @bilafond lm: You are welcome. Do let me know how it turns out, and contact me with any questions.

    • bilafond lm profile image

      bilafond lm 4 years ago

      I will definitely try this. Thanks for the lens

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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @olmpal: Do let me know how it turns out for you, and thank you for visiting my page!

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      olmpal 4 years ago

      My mother used to make homemade yogurt when I was a kid. We had our own milk from our cows and goats at that time. Your method using the thermos sounds interesting. I'm thinking I will give it a try.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @heidipj: So glad you tried the recipe, Heidi, and thanks for letting me know what you ran into.

      When using store-bought yogurt as a starter, read the label for date and content first. You want the freshest yogurt you can get. You also want yogurt that has no gelatin or other thickeners. If the producer had to use thickeners, you're unlikely to get enough live bacteria, if any, to make yogurt.

      As for taste, different producers use different bacilli to culture their yogurts, which can result in some variation in taste. Use a plain (no fruits, food dyes or sweeteners) yogurt you know you like.

      Check the label, too, for live cultures. Not only must your yogurt be "made with live cultures," but it should also say "contains live cultures." Nancy's Organic Plain Yogurt is a good one to try if you live in the Mountain States or on the West Coast.

      Next, keep in mind that, when working with live bacteria, more is not always a good thing. Take care to keep the cultured yogurt-to-milk ratio the same as you see in the recipe.

      Here's why. If you add too much live yogurt, there may be too few sugars in the milk to feed all the little yogurt-making bacilli enough to grow fat and give you that nice tangy taste. Conversely, too little--or too old--live yogurt, and the bacteria will take longer to multiply and convert the milk to yogurt.

      You are correct that length of incubation makes a difference in thickness and in taste.

      My sweetheart prefers a mild, but thick, Greek-style yogurt, so I incubate just 8 hours, which leaves it thinner, as you describe. I usually make two batches of that and strain for Greek-Style yogurt.

      When I want thicker, tangier yogurt, I incubate 12 hours, pop the thermos unopened in the fridge another 12, and by the time I take it out, I have nice thick, delicious yogurt just the way my granddaughter and I love it. We can down the entire thermos like that! It's not as thick as Greek Yogurt. You still need to strain to get that. (Or try sheep's milk, as the Greeks make it.)

      As I mentioned elsewhere on the page, I once forgot about the incubating thermos for 24 hours, and I got a gorgeous, tart and tangy, thick yogurt. I have also experimented with leaving the yogurt for 36 hours, but that apparently was too long. The yogurt began to break down. Presumably, the bacteria had consumed all available milk sugars and could not sustain further growth.

      Do let me know how your next batch grows.

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      heidipj 4 years ago

      Hi Grace! I finally made yogurt according to your thermos recipe. It worked! (And yes the sense of pride was overwhelming) But... Well...It's not perfect for me though - it's more like a thick milk with a very mild flavour. I prefer yogurt to be thicker and more sour - do I just leave the yogurt in the thermos for longer?? I didn't use a yogurt starter I just used a live yogurt that I bought at the supermarket. Any tips on the prefect, thick, greek style yogurt?

      Thanks Grace!

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @katprice lm: Kat, do let me know how it turns out and contact me with any questions.

    • katprice lm profile image

      katprice lm 4 years ago

      Thanks so much for this lens! I love yogurt and I will attempt to make a batch in honor of National Dairy Month.

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      DoubleUnder 4 years ago

      Great information and very detailed. You cover many great points and from Raw to pasteurized. Excellent.

    • junecampbell profile image

      June Campbell 4 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      I used to make homemade yogurt years ago. It is quite easy to make and more economical than the store bought,

    • RoadMonkey profile image

      RoadMonkey 4 years ago

      Never tried making it before but had some from a friend in Greece who made her own and it was delicious. Must try making some myself.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @thingz1: Thanks for visiting!

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @heidipj: I have not, but other bloggers write of making homemade yogurt with goats milk. I imagine it would be even more delicious. If I had a milk-producing goat, I would use her milk happily.

    • ecogranny profile image
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      Kathryn Grace 4 years ago from San Francisco

      @Lee Hansen: Good question! Thank you for asking. I pour boiling water into the thermos. My thermos has an inner lid and an outer cup. I lay the inner lid in the cup and fill the cup with boiling water.

    • Lee Hansen profile image

      Lee Hansen 4 years ago from Vermont

      How do you recommend sterilizing the thermos and its lid?

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      heidipj 4 years ago

      Really pleased I found this lens. I love yogurt but have been stuck buying these tiny tubs of plain goats milk yogurt because I am off cows milk at the moment. Have you ever made it with goats milk? I assume it would be just same. Can't wait to try it!

    • thingz1 profile image

      thingz1 4 years ago

      Great information. I'd like to give it a try.Thanks!

    • Millionairemomma profile image

      Millionairemomma 4 years ago

      I did not know this was possible until now. Simply amazing!

    • SailingPassion LM profile image

      SailingPassion LM 4 years ago

      Looks good to try with goats milk i drink

    • LadyFlashman profile image

      LadyFlashman 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      I have been thinking about making my own yogurt for a while now, but haven't got round to it yet. This lens has given me a boost to really try, it looks so simple! Fantastic lens, very helpful!

    • orangegirl6020 profile image

      orangegirl6020 4 years ago

      Great lens! I've never made my own yogurt. I thought it would be incredibly complicated. You've shown me differently, thank you!

    • Mariajomith profile image

      maria 4 years ago from pa

      wonderful lens, my husband's aunt has been suggesting part of this method, without the sterilization. i was hesitant, your lens makes me much more confident. thanks

    • Margaret Schindel profile image

      Margaret Schindel 4 years ago from Massachusetts

      I'm definitely willing to give this method a try!

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      There is a restaurant that makes really good yogurt a few steps away from us so I just buy it but when we move to Hanoi next week, I might just try making my own.

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      ernestoserna 4 years ago

      I'm a homemade maker follower!

    • LittleLindaPinda profile image

      Little Linda Pinda 4 years ago from Florida

      Yes.

    • Winter52 LM profile image

      Winter52 LM 4 years ago

      Haven't made our own for a while now, but you do get sick of all of those containers that you have to recycle... at least you can do that, but I would rather not have to be bothered. And we do go through a lot of yogurt in a week.

    • Sniff It Out profile image

      Sniff It Out 4 years ago

      I have made yoghurt before using one of those insulated mugs, it worked really well. I don't know why I stopped making yoghurt really, you have inspired me to give it another go... thank you and 'Blessed'!

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 5 years ago from San Francisco

      @Lee Hansen: Wonderful! Thanks so much for letting me know.

    • Lee Hansen profile image

      Lee Hansen 5 years ago from Vermont

      I shared this lens with my daughter and SHE made delicious home made yogurt!

    • Deadicated LM profile image

      Deadicated LM 5 years ago

      Thanks for all the really great information; I'm going to try this, cool Lens.

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 5 years ago from San Francisco

      @anonymous: Hi Lisa. Thank you for stopping by my page and reading it. It is true that I am not a vegan and do not anticipate becoming one, although I do enjoy some vegan recipes.

      I am happy to receive the vegan perspective on this lens, and I would encourage you to state your views about the vegan lifestyle in a positive way in hopes of encouraging others to consider it as well.

      If you know of a good homemade yogurt recipe using coconut milk or other vegan substitute, I would be interested in learning about it.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Kinda dumb this person is worried about environment issues yet buys milk..(and willing to bet they buy eggs and meat as well) which is the biggest contributor to global warming. Make VEGAN yogurt and step it up!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @Funny_Beekeeper: Dear funny Beekeeper, have you tried using raw milk? I have met several people who found that they can use it even though they are not able to use regular processed milk. The raw milk has all the live enzymes in it, so they say, and this explains why anyone can eat it. It digests itself! so to speak... food luck, because organic milk is actually very beneficial for women, according to my "anti-estrogen diet" book (another great information source for women.)

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      My mom made yogurt regularly when I was a teenager, I am inspired! I am going to do this myself now too. thanks so much for the lens.

    • ItayaLightbourne profile image

      Itaya Lightbourne 5 years ago from Topeka, KS

      I have made my own yogurt! LOVED it!! Did not think of making it in a thermos though. Great idea. Wonderful article! :)

    • dahlia369 profile image

      dahlia369 5 years ago

      My grandmother was making her own kefir for years - but I only found out about home made yogurt a few years ago. Good, simple recipe, thank you!! :)

    • Einar A profile image

      Einar A 5 years ago

      Excellent article on the hows and whys of making home-made yogurt! Yes, I have made my own, both in a thermos as you describe and in the oven (heat oven, turn off, leave yogurt mixture overnight in a shallow baking pan) and agree that the results are far more economical, and tasty, than what you might buy in the store!

    • sousababy profile image

      sousababy 5 years ago

      This is brilliant . . I hope to get up enough courage to try this (I'm just learning how to cook, etc 'for real' within this last year - I know, sad isn't it). You've made this seem quite doable (esp. for me).

      Take good care,

      Rose

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      Funny_Beekeeper 5 years ago

      I've been making my own yogurt for more than 2 years and all I can say is, that it was much better than one you can buy in store. But lately I found out that all milk products cause some problems to me, so I try to stay away from them. Too bad, because I really like homemade yogurt....in fact I like it as much as I like your lens ;)

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      allurieligerie 5 years ago

      nice work

    • TTMall profile image

      TTMall 5 years ago

      great work

    • norma-holt profile image

      norma-holt 5 years ago

      Yes, I used to make my owm yogurt but have not done so for awhile now. This is a great lens. Blessed and featured on Blessed by Skiesgreen 2012. Hugs

    • SpellOutloud profile image

      SpellOutloud 5 years ago

      I've made yogurt in our crock-pot a couple of times. It was easy and good! Great lens!

    • TransplantedSoul profile image

      TransplantedSoul 5 years ago

      I have not - but might give it a whirl now!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      very good lens.........

    • greenmind profile image

      greenmind 5 years ago

      cool lens! I'm going to try this...

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 5 years ago from San Francisco

      @anonymous: Thank you so much!

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      megabu717 5 years ago

      In my home we used to make homemade yogurt. Yum yum, love it! Time for me to keep this tradition. Great lens.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Just stopped by to Tweet and post this on FB. Yummy how to yogurt lens. :D

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      julieannbrady 5 years ago

      I had never contemplated my own yogurt ... but have been thinking I need to add it to my diet for the probiotic advantages.

    • flinnie lm profile image

      Gloria Freeman 5 years ago from Alabama USA

      Hi I love yogurt and buy it all the time.Would very much like to make my own.I like the easy part of making it this way.Thanks for the info,great lens.

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      sheezie77 5 years ago

      Very nice lens! thank you for sharing!

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      nikyweber 5 years ago

      awesome lens! Squidlike!

    • LovelyGalores profile image

      LovelyGalores 5 years ago

      Thanks

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 5 years ago from San Francisco

      @jptanabe: Do let me know how it turns out, and if you have any questions, give me a shout.

    • ecogranny profile image
      Author

      Kathryn Grace 5 years ago from San Francisco

      @Rusty Quill: I've only succeeded with the oven method once, and that was during an exceptionally hot week. I forgot the yogurt until the third day. It was perfect!

      In the old days, when people cooked on wood stoves, my great grandmother made yogurt by setting the milk on top of the upper oven--the one they used to keep buns warm and such.

      Sadly, I have never succeeded in repeating that one oven-method success, however. May I suggest you check Freecycle to see if someone has an old thermos they don't need? Stainless steel with a wide mouth works best, but as I said, I've used every one of the types I mentioned in the lens.

    • Rusty Quill profile image

      Rusty Quill 5 years ago

      Very creative way to make yogurt - I wish I had a thermos. I just tried making yogurt by putting it in an oven heated to warm and then turned off like found in Nourishing Traditions, but my first attempt didn't turn out - it was a gross slimy consistency. Not sure what went wrong, maybe it wasn't warm enough long enough. Maybe I'll try again with a smaller test batch this time. :)

    • jptanabe profile image

      Jennifer P Tanabe 5 years ago from Red Hook, NY

      Yes, I used to make my own yogurt - and it was delicious. Now with your recipe I'm encouraged to do it again!

    • victorianpassage profile image

      victorianpassage 5 years ago

      Great lens! Thanks!

    • spartakct profile image

      spartakct 5 years ago

      Thanks for sharing

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      NC Shepherd 5 years ago

      I've tried making yogurt, but have never been satisfied with it. I'm bookmarking this lens so I can try your method.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      purchased the yogurt maker for my mom and she uses it a lot.

    • kathysart profile image

      kathysart 5 years ago

      I used to make my own yogurt ALL the time.. I gotta start doing it again!! Thanks for he reminder! Angel blessed.

    • flycatcherrr profile image

      flycatcherrr 5 years ago

      I love yogurt. My mother always used to make it, but I've never had the courage to try. Perhaps now I might!

    • darciefrench lm profile image

      darciefrench lm 5 years ago

      This seems like a super easy way to make yogurt at home. Many thanks!

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      tasos30fullou 5 years ago

      Nice Lens.Bravo

    • hsschulte profile image

      hsschulte 5 years ago

      I've tried this so many times and never have been able to get it right. Maybe with the guidance of this lens I can finally make yogurt!

    • bechand profile image

      bechand 5 years ago

      I am in awe of many of you that do stuff like this - I have never made my own yogurt. I bet is just great !

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I've been making my own yogurt for 40 years. commercial just doesn't compare. now that I've been vegan for awhile, I've hesitated to make yogurt. I think I may need to add a thickening agent.

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      DebMartin 5 years ago

      Yes. I've made it both ways. I have a yogurt maker at home. It is at least 30 years old so I got my money's worth. When I'm backpacking or wilderness canoeing or at fish camp in the northern bush, I use a thermos. An insulated mug neatly packed in the middle of some warm clothes in my backpack gets the job done every time.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Just like us, yogurt east sugar and gets fat! That just struck me so fun...but of course, in the process of becoming yogurt, the sugars in milk are broken down for our bodies to come out slim...its like magic! I think you will be having many folks making their own yogurt, saving money, being able to pronounce all the ingredients and getting the health benefits without any down side...except that it will be so good that it will go fast!

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      Amoonlighter2011 5 years ago

      GREAT!!! I have heard that nursing moms can make breast milk into yogurt too! It would be neat to try for a little one! I also like how you put your lens together! very well done!

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      Lee Hansen 5 years ago from Vermont

      You just gave me a brilliant idea for my daughter's Christmas present. She buys Stonyfield but anguishes over the plastic tubs. Now she can make local milk yogurt for her family's tastes and save money and the planet.

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      trees001 5 years ago

      This is very cool! I can't wait to give this a try! Thanks for sharing it.

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      Renaissance Woman 5 years ago from Colorado

      I never imagined being able to make my own yogurt. Thank you for teaching me how to do this. Now I can see myself creating some wonderfully healthy homemade yogurt. I love that I now have this option. Appreciated!

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      dc64 lm 5 years ago

      I really don't like the taste of yogurt and so it is difficult for me to find one I like. I eat it only because it's good for me, but was drawn here out of curiosity. I do admire anyone willing to make anything from scratch, and so my hat is off to you.

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      deenie61 5 years ago

      Looking for reviews on yogurt makers, I stumbled on directions for making yogurt in a crock pot. I make 2 quarts at a time, love it! Have made about 7 batches so far. I do thicken with gelatin as I use skim milk to make fat-free yogurt while dieting. Sweeter yet, due to new competition in our small town, 2 stores have been selling milk for $2 a gallon. Could it get any better? At this price I'm enjoying LOTS of yogurt.

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      Author

      Kathryn Grace 5 years ago from San Francisco

      @Shoputopian: Wow. I am honored. Thank you so much! Please do let me know how your yogurt turns out. And contact me if you have any questions along the way.

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      Karnel 5 years ago from Lower Mainland of BC

      Grace I'm glad I came back to revisit, I just nominated this for Lotd, this is an amazing lens and I am going to use your yogurt recipe and know how to make yogurt for the 1st time...Thanks for sharing with all of us!

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      Joan Hall 5 years ago from Los Angeles

      I recently bought a yogurt maker and we love the homemade yogurt! Unfortunately, we've lost one jar and one lid to breakage, so I need to get some replacement jars.

      Love this lens. Your descriptions and pictures are great!

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      vkumar05 5 years ago

      Looking very interesting, already

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      Karnel 5 years ago from Lower Mainland of BC

      Let me know when you finish this lens, It looks like it will be awesome once completed and I want to re-visit

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