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Tasty, Healthy and Hearty Edamame Recipes

Updated on December 30, 2010

The many delicious ways of preparing edamame.

Have you heard of edamame? Pronounced e-da-ma-mei, the Japanese name literally means "twig bean" and refers to young soybeans in the pod that can simply be boiled with a little salt and then eaten as is or mixed in dishes or salads.

Aside from Japan, edamame is commonly found in China, Korea and Hawaii but it has recently become popular all over as a health food.

I love to eat edamame from the shell because half the fun is in popping the bean out of the pod into your mouth. The other half of course is in sinking your teeth into the crunchy, juicy soybean.

If you're looking for other ways to prepare this lean mean soybean, below is a selection of delicious and healthy edamame recipes that you can try out.

Important note: Unfortunately edamame is not safe for those allergic to soy.

Image courtesy of cvander under the CC license

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Shelled Edamame Beans
Shelled Edamame Beans

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Buy frozen Edamame (Soy Beans) in the Shell - You can enjoy the beans as is or mixed in salads and side dishes

Frozen Edamame (Soy Beans) In Shell - 20 Lb Case
Frozen Edamame (Soy Beans) In Shell - 20 Lb Case

Soybean in the pod, available year round. Great served as a snack, used in soups, or added to vegetable side dishes. They are high in fiber, iron, and calcium.

 

Edamame Health Benefits - Why you should eat this wonder veggie.

Enjoyed for centuries in Japan, the tasty soybean has recently become very popular all over the world as a healthy and nutritious snack because it definitely trumps other munchies in terms of nutritional value.

The following are the health benefits of edamame.

* Edamame is an excellent source of low-calorie protein which makes it a popular snack among vegetarian athletes. A half-cup of these young beans has eleven grams of protein and is one of the few vegetarian protein sources that have all nine of the essential amino acids the body can't make.

* The fat in edamame is the heart-healthy kind, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats that help to lower cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. Plus, they're a caloric bargain at only 125 calories.

* Each half-cup of edamame has four grams of fiber to help lower cholesterol levels and keep you satiated so you won't reach for a candy bar later on.

* The isoflavones found in edamame and other soy products can help to lower the risk of heart disease according to some studies and may also lower blood cholesterol levels.

* The isoflavones in edamame help to maintain bone density by exerting estrogen-like effects on bone tissue. It's also a good source of calcium which is important for strong teeth and bones.

Find more articles that details edamame's nutritional benefits.

Information sourced from HealthMad

I like to eat edamame straight from the shell! How about you?

I like to eat edamame straight from the shell! How about you?
I like to eat edamame straight from the shell! How about you?

Basic Edamame Recipe - The simplest way to prepare edamame...

The quickest way to prepare edamame is to boil it in a pot of water with some salt. Here are the steps:

Step 1: Fill the pot 3/4 full with fresh, cold water and put it on stove on high heat.

Step 2: Add 3 tablespoons of salt to the water.

Step 3: When the water comes to a boil, reduce the heat to medium high, add the edamame pods, and cook for 5 minutes.

Step 4: Turn the stove off. Pour the hot water and edamame into a colander, and run cold water over the cooked edamame to cool it.

Step 5: Place the cooled edamame in a dish and enjoy it! You can sprinkle some coarse sea salt over the cooked edamame.

To eat, press the pods between your fingers to push the beans out, or put two-thirds of the pod in your mouth and, clamping your teeth gently over the pod, pull it out, popping the beans into your mouth.

Tip: If you want to use edamame in a salad, cook them first and then shell by hand.

Watch the video below for complete instructions.

Edamame Recipes

Various ways to prepare edamame, from healthy soups and salads to delicious sidings to your main dish.

Chili Garlic Edamame - A light soybean snack with a spicy kick. You can serve this is as an appetizer too.

Chili Garlic Edamame
Chili Garlic Edamame

Chili Garlic Edamame

Serves 4

You will need:

1 pound edamame in shells

1 tablespoon peanut oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 teaspoons sambal oelek (chili paste)

kosher salt

Directions:

1. Cook edamame according to package directions. Transfer to a bowl.

2. Heat peanut oil in a small pan over medium heat. Add garlic and sambal oelek and cook for 30 seconds.

3. Pour chili-garlic mixture over the top of edamame and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt.

Serve.

Recipe from Life's Ambrosia

Image shared by rkazda under the CC license

Edamame Hummus - Enjoy this dip with toasted pita bread or your favorite vegetable crudites.

Edamame Hummus
Edamame Hummus

Edamame Hummus

You will need:

1/2 pound frozen shelled edamame, about 1 1/2 cups

1/4 cup tahini

1/4 cup water

1/2 teaspoon freshly grated lemon zest

1 lemon (about 3 tablespoons), juiced

1 clove garlic, smashed

3/4 teaspooon kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon ground coriander

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Suggested serving: Sliced cucumbers, celery, and olives

Directions:

1. Boil the beans in salted water for 4 to 5 minutes, or microwave, covered, for 2 to 3 minutes.

2. In a food processor, puree the edamame, tahini, water, lemon zest and juice, garlic, salt, cumin, and coriander until smooth. With the motor running, slowly drizzle in 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and mix until absorbed.

3. Transfer to a small bowl, stir in the parsley and drizzle with remaining oil. Serve with the suggested vegetables, or refrigerate, covered, up to 1 day.

Recipe from Food Network

Image courtesy of TheDeliciousLife shared under the CC license

Lemongrass Orzo Salad - A light, tasty and zesty salad peppered with edamame beans.

Edamame Salad
Edamame Salad

Lemongrass Orzo Salad

You will need:

2 cups orzo, cooked and chilled

1 cup grape tomatoes

1 cup cooked and shelled edamame

4 tbsp lemongrass, ground

1/4 cup EVOO

1/2 cup wine vinegar

1 clove garlic, minced

Squeeze of Lemon

1/4 cup minced celery

Salt and pepper

Directions:

Combine and chill.

If you don't have Orzo, you can replace it with another pasta or with cooked brown rice)

Recipe from Norwich Nuts

Image courtesy of norwichnuts shared via a CC license

Guacamame Salsa - Guacamole and edamame combine to form this healthful, delicate salsa.

Guacamame Salsa
Guacamame Salsa

Guacamame Salsa

You will need:

1 avocado

1 cup cooked edamame

1 teaspoon lime juice

1 tablespoon cilantro

1/2 cup salsa

1 small can chopped green chiles

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

Directions:

1. Process the avocado, edamame, lime juice and cilantro in a food processor for about 30 seconds, until almost smooth.

2. Add salsa, chiles, and garlic powder. Serve with chips or crunchy vegetables.

Recipe from Deseret News

Image courtesy of LadyBirdMontoya shared under the CC license

Savory Edamame Braid - Edamame is baked in a crust to form pretty pastry for afternoon tea.

Savory Edamame Braid
Savory Edamame Braid

Savory Edamame Braid

Feeds 10

You will need:

½ cup wheat flour

½ cup all purpose flour

1/4 cup vegetable margarine

Pinch sea salt

4 tbsp cold water

Directions:

1. Combine flours then cut in margarine.

2. Slowly mix in water. Divide into two balls and roll out on floured surface.

3. Spread 1 cup soy butter on each crust and sprinkle with salted roasted edamame. Fold over then braid the two together. 4. Brush with vegetable margarine and a sprinkle of sea salt.

5. Bake 400 degrees 25-30 minutes. Slice and serve.

Recipe from Yummytime

Image courtesy of norwichnuts shared under the CC license

Buy ingredients for this dish right here.

Edamame Soup - A tasty, healthy and chunky soup to start your meal with.

Edamame Soup
Edamame Soup

Edamame Soup

Makes 4 cups

You will need:

1/2 tsp olive oil

1/2 medium onion, finely chopped

1 small potato, peeled and cut into small cubes

3/4 lb frozen edamame beans, defrosted

2 cups vegetable stock

3 oz (about 2 cups) fresh baby spinach

salt and pepper

Directions:

1. In a pan, saute the onion and potato in the oil over medium heat, stirring frequently. Cover and allow to soften for about 4 minutes.

2. Stir to prevent the mixture from sticking and burning. Add the beans and the vegetable stock.

3. Put the lid on and simmer over medium heat for about 15 minutes until the beans are tender.

5. Add the spinach and simmer until softened.

6. Puree in a food processor or with a hand blender.

Recipe from 101 Cookbooks via 33 Flavors

Image courtesy of heidi33 shared under the CC license

Buy ingredients for this dish right here.

Vignole (Spring Vegetable Stew) - Have a taste of spring in this delectable and hearty veggie stew.

Vignole
Vignole

Vignole (Spring Vegetable Stew)

You will need:

10 oz. frozen artichokes

kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

12 oz. edamame

1 bunch of asparagus, cut into 1 inch pieces

1 regular leek, white and light green parts, cut into 3 inch lengths, washed

1/2 pound spinach, picked and washed

extra virgin olive oil

1 small white onion, peeled and finely chopped

1 glove of garlic, thinly sliced or finely chopped

1.5 c. chicken stock

12 oz. fresh peas

4 thick slices of prosciutto (or use a favorite ham or bacon)

a small bunch of fresh mint, leaves picked

a small bunch of fresh flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked

Directions:

1. Boil a pot of salted water. Blanch the leeks for 3-4 minutes. Add the asparagus for 2 minutes. Remove and add in the spinach for a minute. Remove and add the edamame for a minute or so. Take them out and place in a colander on the sink.

2. Heat a very large sauce pan over medium. Add a bit of olive oil and then the onion. Cook slowly for 10 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for a minute. Crank up the heat. Add the chicken stock and the peas and bring to a boil. Lay the prosciutto over the top and reduce the heat to a simmer for 10 minutes or so.

3. Meanwhile, tear the leeks into strips. Roughly chop the spinach.

4. Remove the prosciutto and place on a cutting board. Let it cool for a while.

5. Add the leek strips, the edamame, asparagus, spinach, and artichokes into the peas. Bring back to a simmer, letting them slowly cook for about 10 minutes.

6. Chop the herbs finely. Chop the prosciutto into bite-size pieces. Add them into the stew.

7. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Add a swirl or two of olive oil.

Recipe from The Peche (adapted from Jamie Oliver)

Image courtesy of mrsdewinter shared under the CC license

Risotto with Edamame and Fresh Basil - A hearty risotto fortified with edamame beans that you can eat as a main course or a siding to a meat dish.

Edamame Risotto
Edamame Risotto

Risotto with Edamame and Fresh Basil

You will need:

1 1/2 cups short-grain brown rice

6 cups chicken stock

1 onion, diced

1/3 cup basil, chiffonade style

1 1/2 cups shelled edamame

1 cup freshly grated pecorino romano

2 tablespoons butter

freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions:

1. Add a little olive oil to your pot and cook the onion until translucent or even a bit browned.

2. Add the rice and saute just a minute or two to get it a bit toasty.

3. Add the chicken stock and cover, bringing it to a boil. Turn down to simmer at low to medium heat for about 45 minutes to an hour, but keep a watch on it. You're looking for almost all of the liquid to be absorbed, leaving you with nice creamy rice.

4. Add the edamame and heat through, then remove from heat and stir in the basil, pecorino romano and butter.

5. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

Recipe from CliqueClack Food

Image courtesy of Gudlyf shared under the CC license

More edamame recipes and how-to videos

How about some dry roasted edamame beans to snack on?

Seapoint Farms Dry Roasted Edamame, Sea Salt, 4-Ounce Pouches (Pack of 12)
Seapoint Farms Dry Roasted Edamame, Sea Salt, 4-Ounce Pouches (Pack of 12)

Seapoint Farms Dry Roasted Edamame is a great source of soy protein, containing all 8 essential amino acids & adds no cholesterol or trans-fats to your diet. Just one serving provides you with 14 grams of soy protein and only 2 net carbs. This perfectly roasted green soybean is extremely versatile as a snack, a perfect healthy topper on salads or pour it into your favorite trail mix. 100% Natural ingredients. Non GMO. Product of China.

 

Some more ready-to-eat edamame snacks you can munch on.

Your thoughts about this page are most welcome too.

How do you eat your edamame? - I'd also love to know what you think of this healthy, tasty veggie.

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    • Spirality profile image

      Spirality 3 years ago

      I have never had edamame because they remind me of lima beans and peas which I dislike. But I will definitely try it after seeing your recipes. Thanks!

    • smine27 profile image

      Shinichi Mine 4 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      I love edamame. Never thought of making hummus with it. Must try!

    • profile image

      best-wedding-dress 4 years ago

      I love some of the recipes here. I will try some of them. I do need to eat more vegetables.

    • profile image

      getmoreinfo 4 years ago

      I like these Hearty Edamame Recipes

    • profile image

      slyounkin1 4 years ago

      blanched, cooled and salted

    • profile image

      MissMalaprop 4 years ago

      Love edamame, but I've never had it as hummus - might have to try that one!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      few people know edamame nutrition,most people just know taste edamame,read your article make me know about edamamnutrition and many recipe to make edamame become delicious and healthy

    • Craftypicks profile image

      Lori Green 5 years ago from Las Vegas

      I love edamame. I have bags in the freezer right now. We just pop em into the microwave and add salt. I love the sesame seeds too.

    • captainj88 profile image

      Leah J. Hileman 5 years ago from East Berlin, PA, USA

      Really good recipe ideas shared here, thanks.

    • profile image

      rballaddict 5 years ago

      yumyum!

      i just published a lens about edamame hummus ^_^

      love the slightly nutty texture!

    • Pam Irie profile image

      Pam Irie 5 years ago from Land of Aloha

      I've been eating edamame since moving to Hawaii in 78. Love it!

    • profile image

      SalmonRecipes 5 years ago

      this is interesting lens.

      I like it.

      This is a nutritious food as well

    • profile image

      the_true 5 years ago

      in my country... this vegetable are popular....

      it also can be put in a soup

    • food monkey profile image

      food monkey 5 years ago

      just had steamed edamame tonight with out baked chicken!

    • timelapselove profile image

      timelapselove 5 years ago

      I had no idea you could do so much with edamame! Great looking lens!

    • profile image

      TravelingRae 6 years ago

      I just started to buy frozen edamame and make it in the microwave then serve it with coarse salt. I am going to try every single one of your recipes!

    • profile image

      diet-ebook 6 years ago

      I too love Edamame. Thanks for the great lense on a truly wonderful food!

    • EdTecher profile image

      Heidi Reina 6 years ago from USA

      Thanks for delicious new ways to try edamame. Blessed by a Squid Angel ~

    • Geekgurl profile image

      Kimberly Hiller 6 years ago from Chicago

      I have heard of edamame before since I live in South Korea. Excellent and detailed information about them and how to prepare them. Great information!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Had to come back and give this lens my "blessing". Have a great day!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I grew up in Arkansas raising Soy Beans. I never ate one bean until I had moved away and started eating oriental food. I like them dried and covered in wasabi paste.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Awesome lens!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I've honestly never heard or ever seen edamame, but I'm definitely going to hunt some down. Your recipes look really tasty and very easy to cook.

    • profile image

      aishu19 6 years ago

      We used to eat so much edemame recently..I am glad you reminded me...I want to try your salad recipe

    • justholidays profile image

      justholidays 6 years ago

      Er, I don't eat it; and just discovered about this kind of vegetables here. They look like swamp beans; which are vegetables I really like; so I might try to find edamame in one of our supermarkets and give a try to one of those recipes :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I love edamame. I usually eat it steamed with a little sea salt or roasted as a quick, high-protein snack. Yum!

    • jimmielanley profile image

      Jimmie Lanley 6 years ago from Memphis, TN, USA

      We boil them in the pod and eat them either warm or cold as a snack. But these recipes are wonderful! I want to try them all.