ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

French Bread Recipe

Updated on November 12, 2014
Two Loaves of French Bread
Two Loaves of French Bread | Source

A Favorite French Bread Recipe (or Three or Four)

This page contains three recipes for French Bread: Baguettes, Brioche and a No Knead French Bread. You will also find the history of French Bread and some celebrity quotes about bread.

A good French bread recipe is the best thing since, well ... sliced bread!

This page offers several excellent recipes for this wonderful artisan bread, including a recipe for baguettes and brioche. I have included some links to other baking sites you may enjoy.
Also, just for fun, I included some information about the history of this culinary marvel.

Oh, and just because I like quotes and they amuse me, I have added some quotes that celebs and famous people have said about bread -- the staff of life. I hope you find the quotes entertaining the way I do.



Photo Credit: Flickr Creative Commons.

French Bread on a Rack, Sliced
French Bread on a Rack, Sliced | Source

In Honor of the French Bread Recipe!

Le Pain Français! Famous the world over!

If you can't think of a reason to visit France, the thought of a mouth watering slice of authentic French bread should get you started packing.

France is the most visited country in the world, with 79 million visitors annually who stay more than 24 hours. We can speculate why this is. We can think about the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre and other cultural attractions, the Left Bank, the nightlife, the fashion, the shopping, the food in general -- but I say the main reason people go there is for the French Bread!

According to Wikipedia, French food laws define bread as a product containing only water, flour, yeast, and salt. The addition of any other ingredient to the basic recipe requires the baker to use a different name for the final product.

However, other countries use the term "French bread" to describe bread containing fat and various other ingredients.

The typical French bread recipe often produces a thick crusted bread with air bubbles on the inside. The French bakers usually bake three times daily and sell the bread unwrapped, which keeps the crust crispier.

Two Baguettes
Two Baguettes | Source

Here is a Traditional French Bread Recipe : Baguettes

Baguettes, Demi-baguettes and Ficelles

In French, baquette means "little stick." Baguettes have a crispy crust and are much longer than they are wide. A typical baguette can be a meter long, but only five or six centimeters wide and three or four centimeters high.

Shorter baguettes used for sandwiches are called demi-baguettes or tiers.

However, not all long loaves are called baquettes. A ficelle is a thinner stick.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cup water (or a little more, depending on the type of bread machine you are using).
  • 3 1/2 cups unbleached white flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp Red Star brand active dry yeast

Method

Put all the ingredients in your bread pan. Select the dough setting. When the cycle ends, allow the dough to rise for one additional hour. At that time, punch down the dough and let it rise in the machine for yet another hour. Then remove the dough onto a floured kneading board. Shape it into a ball then flatten it using just your hands.

Line a wicker basket with a kitchen towel and flour the towel. Be sure to use a basket that's twice the size of your dough. Put the dough in the basket. Do not cover. Let rise in a warm place for 45 minutes. (yes, this is the third rising cycle).

When double in bulk, turn the dough upside down onto a greased baking sheet, or for best results, use an authentic baguette pan such as the one shown in the shopping list above.

Take a sharp knife, and being careful not to flatten the loaf, make four slashes across the top, resembling a # sign. .

Preheat your oven to 450 degrees F. Put a cup of boiling water in a small pan which you place on the bottom shelf. Put dough in oven and bake for twenty minutes.

Remove and cool on rack for at least sixty minutes before you slice it. To keep the crust crisp, avoid storing it in a plastic wrap.

This bread will dry out in about two days -- but good heavens, why should it last that long?


Brioche in Fluted Pans
Brioche in Fluted Pans | Source

Another French Bread Recipe -- Brioche

Brioche is a rich French bread with a tender crumb, thanks to the high egg and butter content. An egg wash applied before and after proofing provide a dark golden, flaky crust.

The brioche shown in the picture is the type of brioche we are most familiar with. This brioche is cooked in a fluted tin with a small piece of dough placed on top. Another type, the Brioche Nanterre is cooked in a standard loaf pan, but you place two rows of dough in the pan and allow them to fuse together during baking.

Ingredients for the Brioche

  • 1 lb bread flour
  • 1/2 oz salt
  • 1 1/2 oz sugar
  • 5 eggs
  • 1/2 oz Yeast, fresh, active
  • 8 oz unsalted butter

Method

Mix flour, sugar, yeast and salt. Blend. Add eggs and mix until dough is smooth. Add butter in four separate operations. Work each piece of butter into the dough thoroughly before you add more.

Mix until dough is elastic and clings to the spoon. Cover and chill for six hours. Unwrap the dough. Cut it into two even pieces and shape each piece into a ball. Work the ball into a loaf shape with the palm of your hand. Place in a brioche pan, and let rise in warm spot until a little puffy. Deflate it at that time. Allow it to rise again until it reaches the top of the pan.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Bake for 45 minutes or until the dough is golden brown and moving away from the sides of the pan.

Cool on a wire rack.

History of French Bread

A historian's take

Historian Steven Laurence Kaplan loves French Bread so much he wrote a book on its history. Kaplan is a Goldwin Smith Professor of European History at Cornell University and Visiting Professor of Modern History at the University of Versailles, Saint-Quentin. This man is such a fan he spent 368 pages explaining his passion for a good French bread recipe.

According to Kaplan, good French bread is back after almost a century of poorly made French bread. In fact, the name of his book is Good Bread Is Back.

Kaplan says French bread declined in quality in the 20th century. Consumption dropped off at that time, due to social and economic modernization and the fact that consumers had a wider choice of foods available to them. However, the main reason people stopped eating the bread was because the bread simply did not taste as good. Bakers had abandoned time honored baking techniques in favor of conveyor-belt style baking. This poor quality bread was an affront to France's entire self image.

Eventually, the government and the millers began urging the bakers to go back to the traditional artisan style baking. Their efforts paid off. By the mid 1990s, Parisiens were once again demanding the traditional French bread recipe, a wonderful bread made without additives or preservatives.

Kaplan says the ideal French bread has a particular crust and crumb, mouth feel, aroma, taste and even has a particular sound it makes when you tap on it. He describes each attribute with great care, obviously loving his topic.

Lest you share Kaplan's devotion for the perfect bread, the historian provides a system for assessing the quality of a French bread recipe and gives you the language to use so you can discuss the bread appropriately.

I must confess that I have not tested the recipes on these page using Kaplan's system. I'll leave that to you, gentle reader, to do for me.

The Bread Baker's Apprentice: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread
The Bread Baker's Apprentice: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread

This is an excellent cookbook for those who want to master the art of bread making,

 

French Bread Recipe #3: No Knead French Bread

No need to knead

This probably won't pass muster as authentic French bread, but it's tasty.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup war water (105-115 degrees)
  • 2 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 2 pk dry yeast
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp butter or margarine
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup cold water
  • 6 1/2 to 7 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 egg; beaten
  • 2 tbsp milk
  • poppy seeds or sesame seeds

Method

Mix warm water, 2 1/2 tsp sugar and yeast in a small bowl. Wait five minutes. Mix together the boiling water, salt and two tablespoons of sugar in a large bowl. When butter has melted, add cold water. Cool to lukewarm. Stir the yeast mixture into the water mixture. Add 2-1/2 cups flour.

With an electric mixer at medium speed, beat until blended. Stir in enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough. Let the dough stand for ten minutes, then stir gently and not for long. Cover. Stir gently every ten minutes for the next forty minutes.

Flour a surface; turn the dough onto the surface and divide into three equal parts. Roll each part out to a 13 inch by 8 inch rectangle. Roll it up like you with for a jellyroll, starting with the long side. Pinch the ends together into a seam. Put each loaf on a separate, greased baking sheet, with the seam side down. Cover and let rise in a warm place for about forty minutes or until it has doubled in size.

Take a sharp knife, and being careful not to deflate the loaf, make diagonal slits down the long part of the loaves. Make the slits about 1/4 inch deep.

Combine the egg and ilk in a small bowl, beating until blended. Brush gently over loaves after rising. Sprinkle each loaf with poppy seeds.

Bake at 400 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes or until loaves sound hollow when tapped.

This recipe produces bread that freezes well.

Rate This Recipe

Cast your vote for French Bread

Just for Fun -- Celebrity Quotes About Bread

  1. Man cannot live by bread alone: he must have peanut butter. James Garfield
  2. The hunger for love is much harder to remove than the hunger for bread. Mother Theresa
  3. If they can make penicillin out of moldy bread, they can sure make something out of you. Muhammid Ali
  4. There are people in the world so hungry that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread. Mahatma Gandhi
  5. Life is not worth living if I cannot have pasta or bread again. Monica Seles
  6. If you have extraordinary bread and extraordinary butter, its hard to beat bread and butter. Jaques Pepin
  7. Acorns were good until bread was found. Francis Bacon

© 2007 June Campbell

Baker's Corner

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      ShellHarris 9 years ago

      Who doesn't love french bread? Thanks for adding this to my Recipe Galore Group!

    • Arizona-Snow profile image

      Arizona-Snow 9 years ago

      Nice lens, well deserved 5*.

    • profile image

      coollikeme 9 years ago

      Cool lens. 5 star

    • profile image

      Aika 9 years ago

      perfect for pasta! thanks for sharing some recipes. 5*

    • profile image

      Aika 9 years ago

      perfect for pasta! thanks for sharing some recipes. 5*

    • aka-rms profile image

      Robin S 9 years ago from USA

      I can smell the French bread baking through your pics and recipes. Yummy! Thanks for a 5* lens!

    • profile image

      RonAllen 9 years ago

      Have appreciated European breads since I lived in Portugal. Wonder bread will never be tha same. Cheers!

    • profile image

      poutine 9 years ago

      Yummy lens. A 5

    • profile image

      writebak 9 years ago

      I do love homemade french bread. Thanks for the great recipes.

    • kathysart profile image

      kathysart 9 years ago

      Wonderful! I make bread with my bread maker.. I wonder how your recipes would do in it? Have you tried? Maybe drop me a line about it at:

      Hawaiian Travel|Hawaiian Fun Food

      https://hubpages.com/travel/hawaiianartprints

      I send cookies!

      Kathy's Chocolate Chip Cookies

      Cream together:

      1 cup 'real' butter (not margarine!)

      1 1/2 cup sugar

      1 1/2 Tbl. black strap molasses

      1 tsp. salt

      add and blend two eggs

      don't overdo this part or your cookies will turn out weird.

      sift together then fold into sugar mixture:

      2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. baking soda

      add and mix to above mixture:

      1 cup coconut

      3/4 cup old fashioned oatmeal

      2 full cups chocolate chips

      Bake at 325 degrees for about 12 minutes. Use only an old junkie cookie sheet... not one of the new ones, they tend to make these cookies cake. Take the cookies out 'just a hair BEFORE they are done'. Let them finish up after they come out of the oven.

      Aloha, Kathy

    • profile image

      LeslieBrenner 9 years ago

      Oh, I love French bread, especially baguettes and sour dough. You just can't find good sour dough in NYC, however.

    • profile image

      KathleenH 8 years ago

      nightcats, you have so many lovely lenses about bread, I do hope you'll join them all up to the new Bread Group (http://www.squidoo.com/groups/bread). I love the history you've included here - it's so interesting. And of course the recipes are fantastic! Thanks for putting in the work to make a great 5-star lens.

    • StevenCousley profile image

      Steven Cousley 8 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      Great work on the lens. The recipe's are nice and simple, perfect for the home baker. 5* effort.

      I'm going to disagree with your bio though. I personally think it's a good idea to find something you enjoy doing and then get somebody to pay you for doing it. :)

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 8 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      [in reply to StevenCousley] Hi Steven. Well, you see, I once got a job cooking in a restaurant. I cooked for about eight or nine years, five days a week. I took a cooks job because I loved cooking but by the end of several years, I disliked it intensely. After I changed occupations, it took me a few years before I enjoyed cooking again.

    • StevenCousley profile image

      Steven Cousley 8 years ago from Young, NSW, Australia

      [in reply to nightcats]

      My stories a little different. I took the first job that came along after school as an apprentice baker. Turns out that I liked doing it. 26 years later I'm still doing it. I've left a few times to try other things but I keep coming back to baking. Sometimes I bake at home too. :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      This is great. I am marking it as a favorite. I love french bread, probably too much.

    • Lizblueberry profile image

      Lizblueberry 8 years ago

      I love french bread and wish I had the time,skill and tools to make french bread! I resort to buying it at a little french bakery in Ormond Beach Fl! The most wonderful smell is that of bread baking!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I love brioche. That perfect mix between moist and butter flavor. Brings water to my mouth just thinking about it :)

      Great lens!

    • eclecticeducati1 profile image

      eclecticeducati1 7 years ago

      Great lens! These recipes sound wonderful!! Blessed by an Angel.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 7 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @eclecticeducati1: Thank you! How lovely to get an Angel Blessing.

    • VarietyWriter2 profile image

      VarietyWriter2 7 years ago

      Well done. Blessed by a SquidAngel :)

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 6 years ago

      OMG, I have loved French bread since I was a little grasshopper growing up in Cleveland, Ohio ... and then one day, I had the honor of actually visiting Paris, France and tasting that French bread in person. Today, thanks to the little monster Kipsy, I am here to pick up your recipe to have with our crab cakes, fish tacos, and cole slaw! Yumm!

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @julieannbrady: The French bread you get in Paris is unsurmountable! But the kind you can make yourself is darned good too! Thanks for commenting.

    • BarbRad profile image

      Barbara Radisavljevic 6 years ago from Templeton, CA

      I love French bread, but it doesn't have much fiber. This did show me how to make it, though. I've never quite been able to make French bread come out as I expected it to.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @BarbRad: Yes that is unfortunately true. French bread does not have much fibre. Its best saved for a special treat.

    • profile image

      Marijoyce 6 years ago

      This is a marvelous lens. I love French bread.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @Marijoyce: Thank you so much for stopping by.

    • annel lm profile image

      annel lm 6 years ago

      Yes, yes, it's time to start making my own bread, I just thought about it yesterday :)))

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @annel lm: You just can't beat home made bread. Thanks for visiting.

    • Spook LM profile image

      Spook LM 6 years ago

      Have always loved French bread. I'll have to try the recipe one day. Blessed by an Angel.

    • Sylvestermouse profile image

      Cynthia Sylvestermouse 6 years ago from United States

      My husband and I both enjoy baking bread. We usually like different types, but I believe you have offered us one or two recipes we both will enjoy! Thank you! It is a lot more fun when we work together :)

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @Sylvestermouse: You and your husband are truly blessed to have a shared interest like this one. Thanks for visiting.

    • Mix Mafra profile image

      Michelle Mafra 6 years ago from Corona CA

      What a f=great recipe!!! i so love a warm and fresh baguette. Oh my gosh I am always excited to pick up a french bread when it just out of the oven at Vons or Ralphs and have that butter just melt on it. sooo yummy. i did not know it was that easy to make it and I will have to try it out! I want to thank you for stopping by my love page and i just want to say that i simply love your cat's name. El gordo! so cute and funny!

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @Mix Mafra: Thank you for your lovely comment! My cat thanks you too! (el Gordo means The Fat One, in Spanish-- but we haven't told him what his name means!_

    • SilverLotus1 profile image

      SilverLotus1 6 years ago

      There's nothing like a baguette! Love this lens.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @SilverLotus1: Thank you for stopping by.

    • profile image

      Tarra99 6 years ago

      Mmmm...oven fresh and warm with butter...I can taste it now!...thanks for sharing...and thank you for visiting my stamped domino lens...I appreciate your comments.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @Tarra99: LIkewise. Many thanks for stopping by.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I think you covered everything.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @anonymous: Thanks!

    • profile image

      scar4 6 years ago

      I love CROISSANTï¼truly cute and excellent.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @scar4: Thank you!

    • profile image

      eBid-Squid 6 years ago

      I do love the smell and taste of freshly made Baguettes, Mmmm

      thanks for the recipe, never made bread before, will have to give it a try this week

    • profile image

      recipes-with-pasta 6 years ago

      This is lovely!

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @recipes-with-pasta: Thanks for visiting.

    • Linda Pogue profile image

      Linda Pogue 6 years ago from Missouri

      Excellent lens! I really enjoyed it and can't wait to try some of your recipes. Thumbs up!

    • Salvatore LM profile image

      Salvatore LM 6 years ago

      Your Brioche recipe sounds so Yummy! Beautiful lens!

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @Salvatore LM: Thanks

    • jackieb99 profile image

      jackieb99 6 years ago

      I'll have to give it a go!

    • jolou profile image

      jolou 6 years ago

      I love these different French breads. Especially nice in the wintertime.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @jolou: Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting.

    • sousababy profile image

      sousababy 6 years ago

      Oh, french bread is soooo easy to do. I love it for making croutons and bruschetta. Thank you for spelling out the steps so thoroughly. Homemade is really the best. Take good care, Rose

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @sousababy: You can't beat homemade. Thanks so much for commenting.

    • profile image

      GetSillyProduct 6 years ago

      oooh, yummy, I love french bread and these recipes look really tasty and easy to make!

    • andreaberrios lm profile image

      andreaberrios lm 6 years ago

      This sounds really good!

    • Krafick profile image

      Krafick 6 years ago

      Good recipes. I love French bread That's what I eat everyday. Rafick

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 6 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @Krafick: Thanks for visiting and posting.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @Krafick: French bread ? "French" bread is of Austrian origin.

    • wolfie10 profile image

      wolfie10 5 years ago

      i love french bread.i'll take some of the recipes and try them thank you

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 5 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @wolfie10: Great. Hope you love the results.

    • MelonyVaughan profile image

      MelonyVaughan 5 years ago

      I've been looking for a French bread recipe... Next time I'm making French onion soup, I'll have to make this bread since it's one of the ingredients! Great lens! Thanks for sharing!

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 5 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @MelonyVaughan: I am sure you will love the results.

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 5 years ago

      Nothing better than French bread with some stinky cheese and a glass of red wine ... I like to make garlic bread with it. Yumm.

    • profile image

      RinchenChodron 5 years ago

      I agree with Julie - bread and cheese - yum!

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 5 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @RinchenChodron: Yep. Bread and cheese is about as good as it gets.

    • kindoak profile image

      kindoak 5 years ago

      This is a lens to my taste! I like all sorts of bread, but a favorite is whole grain pain francais.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 5 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @kindoak: There are so many types of bread, all wonderful.

    • Spokanewebdesig1 profile image

      Spokanewebdesig1 5 years ago

      going to give this a shot, looks fun

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 5 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @Spokanewebdesig1: Enjoy.

    • WriterJanis2 profile image

      WriterJanis2 5 years ago

      I so love French bread!

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 5 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @WriterJanis2: Oh me too! Thanks for visiting.

    • Mark Shearman profile image

      Mark Shearman 5 years ago from Alicante Spain

      I love French bread too especially when still hot - hope you don't mind but I featured this lens on my French bread pizza lens.

    • TonyPayne profile image

      Tony Payne 5 years ago from Southampton, UK

      There is nothing quite like a "real" Baguette purchased from the bakery when it's fresh out of the oven. I used to practically like on these when I was in Normandy and Brittany.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 5 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @TonyPayne: Sounds wonderful. Combine it with a French cheese and you have something out of this world.

    • profile image

      olmpal 4 years ago

      I love the smell of a fresh baked baguette! Thanks for the recipes!

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 4 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @olmpal: Thanks for stopping by.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Who doesn't like Fresh Baked Bread! :D

    • Alana-r profile image

      Alana-r 4 years ago

      The nicest of all breads, i love French bread. Great lens!

    • profile image

      gaser983 4 years ago

      Excellent lens, nicely done!

    • tonybonura profile image

      Tony Bonura 4 years ago from Tickfaw, Louisiana

      Since I grew up here in SE Louisiana, I am very familiar with a couple of types of French bread. My dad used to pick it up at the Italian bakery in Independence, LA, on his way home from work. Go figure. Loved this lens. Love French bread and Italian bread and white bread and whole wheat bread..heck I just love bread. A meal is not complete without bread.

      TonyB

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 4 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @tonybonura: I'm a bread lover myself.

    • profile image

      seosmm 4 years ago

      I love bread so much. Lots of great french bread recipes. Very nice job on the lens!

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 4 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @seosmm: Thanks for visiting.

    • opatoday profile image

      opatoday 4 years ago

      STOP I'm starving

    • verymary profile image

      Mary 4 years ago from Chicago area

      when I've been lucky enough to be in France, I will walk around munching on a loaf of plain bread. people probably think I'm nuts, but it is just so great. this is a good reminder to try making it at home again.

    • Merrci profile image

      Merry Citarella 3 years ago from Oregon's Southern Coast

      Can't wait to try the French bread in the bread machine. It looks delicious! First I think I need to get a long enough pan. Thanks for putting this together. The history is interesting too!

    • paulahite profile image

      Paula Hite 2 years ago from Virginia

      Great resource for French breads! You started out our day on G+ today!

    • Susan Zutautas profile image

      Susan Zutautas 2 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Will be trying your French bread recipes once the weather gets a bit cooler. Pinning so that I can easily find your recipes.

    • ecogranny profile image

      Kathryn Grace 2 years ago from San Francisco

      Thank you so much for all this history and for the recipes. I'm excited to try some of them. Thank you too for explaining what true French bread is. I've always wondered. I love that their bread is so important to France that they made a law defining it. Amazing!

      I'm thinking that before the 1900s, a lot of French bread must have been made with whole wheat flour, and I'm wondering if there are any recipes left for making a fine, authentic French loaf with whole wheat and with wild yeast starter. I'm going to have to do some research on that, methinks.

      Thanks for an informative and entertaining page.

    • junecampbell profile image
      Author

      June Campbell 2 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

      @ecogranny: Thanks for dropping by. I hope you find the whole wheat recipe you are looking for,.

    • profile image

      acreativethinker 2 years ago

      Mmmmm I can smell the wonderful aroma of these delightful french bread recipes. Thanks for sharing. Will have to try them soon. Take care :)

    Click to Rate This Article