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How To Make Coffee From Coffee Beans

Updated on September 17, 2014
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How to Make Coffee from Coffee Beans

If you are searching on ways to make coffee from coffee beans, chances are that you are an instant coffee drinker, and want to switch to the more flavorful coffee brewed from coffee beans. Learn how to make coffee from coffee beans, using various coffee preparation methods. Learn what are the easiest ways to make coffee and how can you make gourmet coffee.

Remember, there is no right or wrong in preparing your coffee, as long as you like it. If you never made coffee from coffee beans, you missed a lot. You probably only drank instant coffee, which is OK today. Compared to 20 years ago, there was made a lot of improvement in preserving the flavor, but instant coffee still doesn't compare to a coffee made from coffee beans.

If you are asking yourself "How to make coffee from coffee beans?", chances are you are an instant coffee drinker, and you probably tried real coffee and loved it so much that you want to switch. Is that right? Regardless of your reason to read this, following are the most popular methods to make coffee, and at the end of the page I also show my experiment to brew coffee from unground beans.

Nespresso

Nespresso
Nespresso
Hamilton Beach Drip Coffee Machine
Hamilton Beach Drip Coffee Machine

How Do You Make Coffee from Coffee Beans?

The Drip Coffee Method

The filter method, or the drip, is the easiest method, brewing you a decent cup of coffee, that will not only provide you with the much needed kick in the morning, but it will taste and smell great, pleasuring your taste buds as well.

  • Buy coffee beans from the local shop or online.
  • Buy a grinder, if you are not an expert, you can start with a cheap one. Better grinders shown further in the page.
  • Buy a coffee filter, again a basic one should do it.
  • Grind the coffee beans for a drip machine, this is a medium grind. You can ask the coffee shop to grind a small batch for you first, so you know what the grind size is. But if you grind too much the coffee will lose flavor in time.On a blade coffee grinder, two scoops of beans will take about 10 seconds to be properly ground, but don't take this as a rule.
  • Place your filter in the coffee maker, and measure two tablespoons for each cup of water, (two scoops of ground coffee per 6 ounces of water), for a full strength coffee, less for a weaker coffee, or more than two scoops per cup for a stomach killer. If your coffee is too strong, adding a little hot water works. But don't use cold water.
  • Add only the necessary water in your coffee machine and press the start button. When all the water from the tank has passed on to the coffee pot, you can turn off the machine and pour the coffee. Enjoy it!

Capresso Digital Coffeemaker - Bean To Cup Coffee Machine

If you want to fully automate the process, you should buy a bean to cup coffee machine.

One of the best grind and brew coffee makers on the market is the Capresso 464.05. It has a conical burr grinder, it is fully programmable, you can adjust the strength, the grind size, with a built in clock and timer, and it has a water filter. You don't need to do anything but program this great machine and press a button.

The ground coffee goes straight in the coffee filter, you just feed it beans, and press a button. The included goldtone filter makes your coffee even better. You can still use paper filters if that's what you like.

Capresso 464.05 CoffeeTeam GS 10-Cup Digital Coffeemaker with Conical Burr Grinder
Capresso 464.05 CoffeeTeam GS 10-Cup Digital Coffeemaker with Conical Burr Grinder

Once you start making coffee in a Capresso you will find it hard to drink anything else.

 
Manual Coffee Grinder
Manual Coffee Grinder

How to Grind Coffee Beans without A Grinder

My Coffee is Not Ground - How Do I Brew It?

I have the beans but I don't have a grinder, how do I brew my coffee?

Technically, you can't brew from whole beans, you have to somehow grind the coffee so you can extract the caffeine and the aroma and the flavor.

So if you don't have a grinder, and you don't have the money for it, you need to find a rudimentary way to grind it. Here are a few ways to do it:

  • If you don't have the money to invest in a grinder, use a blender if you have one.
  • Grind your coffee at the store, when you buy it.
  • You have the money, but you you don't have electricity where you go. If you go on a trip for a few days with a backpack, the best option is to take ground coffee with you.
  • If you go at your cabin for a few days, and there is no electricity, and you want fresh coffee, a hand mill is the absolute best option.
  • The same goes for camping. A manual coffee grinder is easy to use, and the good ones will do a job as good as an electric one.

None of the above
If you want to grind your coffee now, and you don't have a grinder or you can't buy one, you can use one of these methods:

  • Put the beans in a clean sock, or a cloth and use a hammer to pound the beans.
  • Use a mortar and a pestle to grind your coffee, this is one of the best ways to control the grind size.
  • You don't have a hammer or mortar and pestle? Use a bigger round rock instead of a hammer.

Porlex JP-30 Stainless Steel Coffee Grinder - Manual Coffee Grinder

This high end manual grinder, is very compact, being very easy to carry anywhere. It features a stainless steel body, very resistant to shocks, and the ceramic burrs will grind very precise grind from coarse to very fine.The Japanese technology makes this grinder indestructible so you will enjoy using it for many years to come.

Photo Credit Amazon.com
Photo Credit Amazon.com

Roasting the Coffee Beans

Green Coffee Beans - Roasting Coffee

If you only have a bag of green coffee beans, and want to make coffee using them, chances are you are going to give up, and buy roasted beans. But if you are stubborn enough, or there is another reason to use those green coffee beans, here are some ways to roast your coffee. Don't even try to brew coffee from green coffee beans, it will be a total disaster.

Use a cast iron frying pan, or just a frying pan on the stove top, set the stove-top to 475 F, and roast until the coffee changes color to dark brown. During this time stir the beans continuously to get an even roast. In about 5 minutes or more the beans will start expand in size and will make a distinctive crackling sound. Once they started to crack, they are almost done, roast them until you obtain the desired color.

Another way is to use a hot air popcorn maker. A powerful one is recommended for roasting coffee. Pour half of cup green coffee beans in the popper and let them roast for around 6 - 8 minutes depending on the desired roast and the popping machine.

The Presto hot air popper machine will roast coffee beans as good as any professional roasting machine, you just have to watch it closely, to make sure you roast it to your taste.

How to Roast Coffee Beans with A Popcorn Machine Video

Cold Brew Coffee From Coffee Beans
Cold Brew Coffee From Coffee Beans

How To Make Coffee from Whole Coffee Beans

Is It Possible to Make Coffee from Whole Bean Coffee?

Since a lot of people are asking on Internet this question, I wanted to make an experiment and see why people insist of grinding the coffee beans and why not make coffee from the whole beans? To be honest I had an idea, but why not have some fun experimenting, and show you some pictures.So I used three tablespoons of whole coffee beans, which I put in a coffee mug. I topped up the coffee mug with water, screwed the lid on, and let the mix rest for 36 hours.After 36 hours I got a pale looking coffee, (to be honest it was much better than my expectations), with an absolutely great aroma and smell, but very weak. A coffee so weak that I could never drink.At this point, I wanted to go further with my experiment and I boiled the soaked coffee beans. They looked as if they were untouched, and by the taste of my cold brew coffee they were almost intact, so I decided to boil them. I boiled the beans for around 20 minutes and I got a stronger coffee, with a darker color, (as you see in the pictures below), which can be considered coffee. However, the boiled coffee was way too acidic for my taste.Conclusion: If you really need to make a coffee from coffee beans, it is possible, but the result is not satisfactory.See the pictures below for more comments and details.

Photo Gallery

Click thumbnail to view full-size
I put the whole bean coffee in a coffee mug and added lukewarm water to fill the mug.I stopped the cold brew after 36 hours, since this experiment isn't about doing big batches, is more about proving if it works or not.I strained the coffee into a glass, for a better visual inspection.The used coffee beans look almost untouched, I suspect that very little has been extracted.The result is a pale coffee,very weak with a nice taste and a great flavor. The sad true is that is way too weak for my taste, I couldn't drink this even if I didn't have any other coffee.So my next step is to bring the experiment a step further and see if boiling extracts a bit more out of the whole beans.So I boiled the coffee beans in half of the cold brew coffee resulted. I boiled the beans for a bit more than 20 minutes.The result is a darker, stronger coffee, but too acidic for my taste, and with a strong burnt smell, which I suspect is due to the exposure with the outer part of the bean, which is burnt.
I put the whole bean coffee in a coffee mug and added lukewarm water to fill the mug.
I put the whole bean coffee in a coffee mug and added lukewarm water to fill the mug.
I stopped the cold brew after 36 hours, since this experiment isn't about doing big batches, is more about proving if it works or not.
I stopped the cold brew after 36 hours, since this experiment isn't about doing big batches, is more about proving if it works or not.
I strained the coffee into a glass, for a better visual inspection.
I strained the coffee into a glass, for a better visual inspection.
The used coffee beans look almost untouched, I suspect that very little has been extracted.
The used coffee beans look almost untouched, I suspect that very little has been extracted.
The result is a pale coffee,very weak with a nice taste and a great flavor. The sad true is that is way too weak for my taste, I couldn't drink this even if I didn't have any other coffee.
The result is a pale coffee,very weak with a nice taste and a great flavor. The sad true is that is way too weak for my taste, I couldn't drink this even if I didn't have any other coffee.
So my next step is to bring the experiment a step further and see if boiling extracts a bit more out of the whole beans.
So my next step is to bring the experiment a step further and see if boiling extracts a bit more out of the whole beans.
So I boiled the coffee beans in half of the cold brew coffee resulted. I boiled the beans for a bit more than 20 minutes.
So I boiled the coffee beans in half of the cold brew coffee resulted. I boiled the beans for a bit more than 20 minutes.
The result is a darker, stronger coffee, but too acidic for my taste, and with a strong burnt smell, which I suspect is due to the exposure with the outer part of the bean, which is burnt.
The result is a darker, stronger coffee, but too acidic for my taste, and with a strong burnt smell, which I suspect is due to the exposure with the outer part of the bean, which is burnt.

What else would you like to know about brewing coffee from whole beans coffee?

© 2012 Dorian Bodnariuc

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