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The World's Best Jambalaya Recipe

Updated on October 13, 2010

An Easy Jambalaya Recipe

The Worlds Best Jambalaya Recipe! This Southern Cajun classic is a great warming dish - similar to paella, rice is the central ingredient here.

One of the best things about this dish is that you can add and substitute things as you wish without affecting the end quality! Whether it be Sausage, Shrimp, chicken or peas - leave out what you don't like and include what you do!

Follow this Jambalaya Recipe now for a great crowd pleasing dish!

The Worlds Best Jambalaya Recipe!

How to cook this easy jambalaya recipe

Ingredients

  • 8 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 1 onion
  • 3 peppers
  • a good handful of chorizo, chopped
  • 450g/1 lb chicken pieces, on or off the bone
  • 2 chopped Scotch Bonnet or other chilli peppers, 1 red, 1 yellow
  • 500g/1 lb 1oz long grain rice
  • 2 tbsp Cajun spices
  • 2 pints chicken stock
  • 1 tsp chilli powder
  • 2 tbsp turmeric
  • mixed vegetables, e.g. carrots, peas, green beans, sprouts, courgettes. I often just buy the mixed frozen ones to keep it cheap!
  • 450g/1 lb king prawns
  • salt and ground black pepper

Method

1. Heat the oil in a large pan and add onion, chopped peppers, garlic, chorizo and chicken pieces then cook for around 8 minutes.

2. Add the chillis.

3. Add the rice and stir. Add the chilli powder, turmeric and Cajun spices and mix in well.

4. Add the chicken stock and bring to a simmer.

5. Add the mixed vegetables and bring to the boil then turn the heat down to a simmer.

6. Once the rice has swollen and is part-cooked, add the prawns or crayfish.

7. Simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour and then season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve.

Jambalaya Recipe Video

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      Gene 2 years ago

      I tried this but added Cajun Olive Oil instead of the regular. It gave it some added kick. Great recipe by the way! http://militellosllc.com/shop/extra-virgin-olive-o...

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      mj11769 4 years ago

      Look homemade jambalaya...great lens...

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Love it Chef Matt!

    • Oikouros profile image

      Oikouros 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Wonderful... this is how my mom always had me make jambalaya. (Mom is from NOLA. I was born but not raised there.) I admit, I add a few touches of my own, eliminate non-kosher meats, etc, but you really cannot add a seasoning of any kind to make up for a lack of veggies sauteed and caramelized in butter!

      My husband keeps asking for some kind of sauce because he went to some hole in the wall food place and they served "jambalaya" that had tomato sauce over it. LOL, then it was NOT jambalaya. Blessings to you and your food, Chef Matt.

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      Oikouros 4 years ago

      We don't eat pork or shellfish here, so I developed my own kosher tips for jambalaya, making southern style spicy turkey sausage from scratch! I love diced tomatoes as well in my jambalaya.

    • Oikouros profile image

      Oikouros 4 years ago

      We don't eat pork or shellfish here, so I developed my own kosher tips for jambalaya, making southern style spicy turkey sausage from scratch! I love diced tomatoes as well in my jambalaya.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: love your corrections...

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi Matt,

      Should the sausage added at the begin and not just after roasting the meet, to get more flavour out of it?

      Your recipe sound pretty good at all, I think I will try it.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi Matt,

      Should the sausage added at the begin and not just after roasting the meet, to get more flavour out of it?

      Your recipe sound pretty good at all, I think I will try it.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi Matt,

      Should the sausage added at the begin and not just after roasting the meet, to get more flavour out of it?

      Your recipe sound pretty good at all, I think I will try it.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      A little boudin added in with half and half of long grain white and brown rice no mudbug's but take a couple and squeeze the juice into the pot with chicken and so forth slow simmered over a pecan wood fire inside a 55 gallon drum for a little pecan smoke flavor kinda giving it a bit of that down home backwoods flavor. What he made here is a creole jambalaya. A cajun jambalaya uses very little to no tomato's at all giving the jambalaya a brownish color rather than red. Better off using home grown or local fresh farm vegetables and fresh ground spices rather than store bought bottled spices. I like shirmp in mine but not to much because I don't like the shrimp flavor to be over powering of the spices, veg's and sausage. You can use Tony's seasoning but highly don't recommend it.

      By the way, I live in the Shreveport area. Stonewall as a matter of fact.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      Um... being from Louisiana this recipe has some good points, (using chicken stock, long-grain rice and the triad) but I've never had Jambayla with peas, carrots, green beans, sprouts or chorizo (though I could see a gourmet version with this).

      For traditional Jambayla:

      - brown your meat (chicken & andouille is my fav) & set aside

      - sautee the triad (yellow onion, garlic, & bell pepper) in butter (much more flavorful than olive oil)

      - combine meat & triad together in a cast iron pot (if available) and add chicken stock until it just covers the mixture

      - boil until the meat is nice and tender

      - stir in rice and cover, turn once during cooking to mix evenly (now is the time to taste test and add garlic powder, onion powder, salt, pepper, cayenne, green onions or whatever spice you're in the mood for; I personally use green onions, cayenne and soy sauce here, sometimes lea & perrin's worcheshire to sweeten it a bit)

      - consider it done when the rice is tender and there's enough liquid to coat the rice in a sauce (more chicken stock may be needed to get the rice tender)

      There's little to no measuring in cajun cooking. It's a wait-and-see kind of thing. Just keep adding until it tastes right to you. For a more measured version look at recipes from the Gonzales, LA Jambalaya Festival.

      Hope this helps some of you.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: I'll definitely will try it. Thanks for the recipe!

      ^_^

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Oh, this is not my recipe at all. Sorry if I confused you. Actually I do not think this recipe would be good at all LOL! So we agree there. This is definitely not something I would serve in my restaurant.

      And I agree that cooking is an art, not a science. To each his/her own, and I respect that. But the techniques involved generally do not alter much, and that is all I was pointing out. The only real difference (besides the ones I've pointed out in my previous post) between your recipe and mine is I add the herbs and spices at the same time I add my broth and rice, that way the rice soaks up the flavor.

      Here is my recipe, tried and true, if you wish to deviate from your's at any point. I've served this in at least 4 restaurants locally over the past 10 years:

      1lb peeled shrimp

      1lb chicken breast, cut into 1/2 inch pieces

      1lb andouille sausage, sliced into 1/2 inch pieces

      1 cup diced onion

      1 cup diced green pepper (bell pepper)

      1/2 cup diced celery

      1.5 cups uncooked long grain rice

      2.5 cups chicken broth

      1 large tomato, finely diced (or a can of petite diced tomatoes, not drained)

      3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped (minced)

      2 tbsp vegetable oil

      1 tbsp butter

      1 tbsp finely chopped basil

      1 tbsp finely chopped thyme

      1 tbsp cajun seasoning (any seasoning with a high salt, pepper, and garlic content)

      1 tbsp allspice

      1 tbsp chili powder

      1/2 tbsp (or 1.5 tsp) cayenne pepper

      1 tbsp parsley

      1 cup chopped green onion

      Add the butter and oil to large pot over medium heat, and sauté the trinity and garlic until translucent (about 7-10 minutes) stirring regularly. Add the chicken and increase heat to medium-high. Once the chicken is mostly cooked, add the sausage and cook for another 7-10 minutes. Now add the tomato, herbs & spices (except the parsley and green onion), broth and rice. Stir to combine and increase heat to bring to a boil, then cover and set temp. to low. Simmer for 25 minutes, then add your shrimp. Stir to combine (do not over-stir or it will get mushy) and then cover and simmer for another 10-15 minutes. Turn off heat, add your parsley and green onions, and serve!

      Enjoy!

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: Forgive me if I've offended you (and for the horrible typo and misuse of triad). I was merely adding a quick opinion and a different take on the traditional Cajun recipe. I liked your ideas on adding a few of the items, like the chorizo or the vegetables. I was looking for a new take on jambalaya when I found your recipe. I just saw a few items I thought were not classic jambalaya ingredients. Although, I'll admit I wasn't considering that cooking is not always exactly the same across Louisiana, it does depend on where you're from within Louisiana. I am actually from south of New Orleans, born and raised in Plaquemines Parish. The recipe I posted is not one I learned in school. I graduated with a BS in biology from LSU⦠definitely not an expert chef by any means. Iâm just a local and itâs just a recipe I picked up and adapted from watching my uncles make it who learned it from my grandfather (all born and raised in Plaquemines Parish).

      As for the points you've made, I agree with most of them. The trinity (not triad, as I have now been correctedâcanât believe I wrote that⦠thanks!) as I've known it can be a combination between celery, bell pepper, onion, and garlic. Of course, Iâm not classically trained. Just choose celery or garlic, but always include bell peppers and onions. Sometimes I'll add all four! ^_^ Depends on my mood and whatâs in the fridge. Great thing I love about cooking is that you can alter it to your tastes or whatâs available. For the butter (which is salted sweet cream stick butter, not margarine, we agree there ^_^), we'll have to disagree on the flavor difference, maybe itâs just because I prefer butter flavor over olive oil. Though, I agree not to use butter when making a roux, I use vegetable oil as Iâve always have. I use the butter to cook the meat, then use the same pot to cook the trinity (minus the meat; usually the sausage provides enough oil for the pot). What that does for flavor? Couldn't tell ya. It's just the way I do it. I know my uncles have always cooked the trinity first. I cooked the meat first once by accident and didnât seem to notice a huge difference. Maybe I'll start reversing it per your suggestion and cook it the traditional way. I like a little gravy or sauce or whatever with my rice. Nothing watery, just a thin layer to keep it moist as it sits. And maybe "sweet" was not quite the term I should have used for the Worcestershire sauce. I agree the majority of it is salty, but I use Lea & Perrin's Worcestershire sauce and I find it adds a smidgen of sweet along with spice and a tang. Itâs fairly complex I think. I guess saying it adds a unique salty/spicy/tangy/sweet flavor would be the better. However, I still stand by my recipe. I may alter it here and there as my mood (or paycheck) sees fit, but I will stick with the overall basic recipe I have laid out. Itâs the traditional (or quasi-traditional) recipe for my family. Maybe I shouldâve clarified things a bit more and stuck with my unclesâ original method for posting the recipe. (Maybe shouldâve used spell check too⦠lol!)

      I didnât mean to make it seem as if your recipe was incorrect. I feel all cooking is a personal art form and the person cooking it should have the freedom to make it his or her own. Just like both of us has done with Jambalaya and others are bound to do. The dish should be defined by the person cooking it and the effort he or she puts into making something delicious for everyone to enjoy. Thereâs nothing like sharing a good cooked meal with friends and family. I just wanted to offer up a different point of view on the recipe. I guess my recipe would be considered semi-traditional and not wholly traditional as the title I originally gave it. And maybe I shouldâve thought a bit more about posting under someone elseâs recipe with my own. It was meant to be a personal opinion and not an insult. I want to thank you for the honest criticism and I feel Iâve learned a thing or two. Iâll definitely explain myself better, think twice next time I decide to post an opinion and use spell check prior to posting. ^_^ I hope we can agree on our unique cultural style of how differences are respected and welcomed into the mix.

      And for any other Cajun reading this⦠I apologize if Iâve offended my Cajun heritage by not clarifying specific aspects of a major and cherished part of our culture, traditional Cajun cooking.

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      @anonymous: LMAO! Girl, you may be from Louisiana, but it sounds like you must be from Shreveport more than the New Orleans area.

      As someone whose entire family - including myself (4 generations total) was born, raised and lived in NOLA (and even further south like Thibodaux, Larose, etc) their entire life, I can tell that you weren't and aren't.

      You do touch on some key points, but no more so than anyone else with the Internet and a few spare minutes. I have a BA in Culinary Arts from the John Folse Culinary Institute at Nicholls State University, so allow me to point out where you are wrong:

      1) It is called the "trinity", not "triad". It's also commonly referred to as the "holy trinity". I almost fell out of my seat laughing at your excessive misuse of the term. Don't believe me? Google "culinary triad". What do you get? A lot to do with nothing relevant. Instead, try "culinary trinity" and bam, tons of results regarding the three staple vegetables. Which brings me to your next error...

      2) The holy trinity consists of onion, bell pepper, and celery. That's it; no garlic. Sure, garlic is used just as often, but it is not part of the trinity. And yes, there are other types of trinities for different cultures (the "classic" trinity of culinary terms stems from France and is also called Mirepoix, which is onion, celery, and carrots), but this is obviously not what you were referring to. I can overlook the fact that you are calling it out of name, but not knowing what it consists of all together? Shame on you.

      3) Butter is definitely NOT more flavorful than *olive oil*. I don't know where you heard this or why you think it, but if it is solely based on your tastebuds then you may need to see a doctor. I believe you actually mean that butter is more flavorful than *vegetable oil*. I can guarantee that no cajun recipe (especially those that call for a roux, like gumbo or etouffee) will ever call for olive oil, because of it's immensely intense flavor.....it is "too" flavorful, and will distract from the underlying flavors that make our cuisine so delicious. Instead, they call for vegetable oil or butter, and in this sense then yes you are correct: butter will produce better flavors than the vegetable oil. However, it should be noted that you are most likely using margarine, not real butter. Here is a tip, for any type of cooking really: if you have real butter, use it......but if not, use vegetable oil. Margarine will do nothing good for your dish.

      4) You ALWAYS start cajun/creole dishes with the trinity, not the meat. I don't care if an online recipe says otherwise, but talk to any real creole chef and (s)he will tell you the same. You start your trinity in (real) butter or veg. oil, let it simmer until translucent, and THEN add your meat to the pan (with the trinity still in it). This will give those nice flavors to your meat - otherwise the meat would be bland. Adding meat to the trinity also effectively stops cooking the trinity so it begins to caramelize instead of continuing to cook. The caramelzation is what really give your meat that deliciously sweet flavor. Without the trinity though, there would be no caramelization.

      5) There should be no "liquid" left in a jambalaya dish. It should be moist, sure, but no more so than a pot of freshly steamed rice.

      6) Worchestershire (not "worcheshire", as you called it) sauce is not sweet at all; in fact, it is quite salty, so I don't see how it can impart any sweetness to your dish. Many people do not realize that the main ingredient (besides water) in worchestershire sauce is anchovies. And anchovies are incredibly salty, hence the saltiness of worchestershire sauce.

      I understand these points may be nitpicking a bit, but please, I'm begging you, stop posting misinformation about our wonderful way of cooking (and way of life). As the saying goes, "Everyone else in the world eats to live, but down here we live to eat!".

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      If you want a real cajun/creole jambalaya, never use chorizo. Use andouille.