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A Recipe for Ukrainian Kapusta

Updated on September 5, 2014

How to Make Ukrainian Kapusta

I learned how to cook kapusta from my sister-in-law, a second generation Ukrainian-American in northeast Ohio. I never liked sauerkraut until I ate this dish. Gloria knew how to prepare kapusta so that it became a rich and hearty stew.

I like to make this kapusta recipe in the winter. It sticks to the ribs and warms you up from the inside out. It is a perfect dish for those in cold climates, such as Northern Ohio or the Ukraine.

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What You Will Need to Make Ukrainian Kapusta

  • One large onion, chopped
  • One large can of sauerkraut (or 2 regular-size cans)
  • 6 potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken stock, vegetable stock or water (I have substituted beer in the past with good results)
  • 1 package of keilbasa or smoked sausage, cut into chunks about 2 inches long
  • One bay leaf
  • 1/2 teaspoon caraway seed
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley flakes
  • Bisquik mix, milk and 1 tablespoon dried parsley flakes for dumplings

How to Make Ukrainian Kapusta

1. Rinse the sauerkraut very well in a colander to remove vinegar taste. This is the key to a good-tasting kapusta.

2. Saute' the chopped onion in a tablespoon of butter or oil in a large pot until transparent. Add the sauerkraut, the stock or water, the potatoes and the meat. Season with caraway seed, a bay leaf, parsley and any additional herbs you desire. Gloria would just throw in whatever she had.

3. Bring to a boil, then turn down to simmer. Simmer this until the potatoes are soft and the meat is beginning to swell open and split, about 45 minutes. It is better to have this a little overcooked than undercooked. You want everything to be a little mushy and all of the flavors to be well-blended.

4. Make dumplings by following the recipe on the Bisquik box for drop biscuits, but add one tablespoon of dried parsley flakes to the dough.

5. Drop by spoonfuls onto the top of the kapusta. Cover and let dumplings steam until cooked through, about 15 minutes.

6. Serve piping hot.

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Creative Commons License | Source

Ukrainian Kapusta Poll I

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More Ukrainian Kapusta Recipes

If this was not the kapusta recipe you were looking for, there are a few others online. Check these out!

Kapusta Poll II

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Tell us your favorite way to eat kapusta! Have you ever had this dish?

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    • KatieKakes profile image

      KatieKakes 5 years ago

      This sounds amazing!!!

    • Showpup LM profile image

      Showpup LM 5 years ago

      My husband adores dishes like these.

    • Linda BookLady profile image

      Linda Jo Martin 5 years ago from Post Falls, Idaho, USA

      Tempting recipe, but I'd have to leave the sausage out as I'm vegetarian.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 5 years ago from Central Florida

      I grew up with sauerkraut (mom even made it from scratch), so I love the stuff. We cook it with kielbasa (Polish sausage) and it is yummy. They have a low-fat turkey kielbasa now.

    • CCGAL profile image

      CCGAL 5 years ago

      Until I read that you rinse the sauerkraut, I didn't think I would like this. Once I read the recipe, though, I realized that I've eaten something similar that was, I believe, either Polish or Portuguese. I believe I would enjoy this dish prepared according to the recipe you've provided. Thank you!

    • Gayle Mclaughlin profile image

      Gayle 5 years ago from McLaughlin

      I have never heard of this recipe--sounds delicious!

    • profile image

      healthandsick 5 years ago

      looks healthy and delicious

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      insightful read to another type of meat out there, enjoyed my visit to your lens this morning, see ya around!

    • profile image

      ClaireDavids 5 years ago

      No, but I most likely will as I currently live in Ukraine. Nice lens!

    • profile image

      poutine 5 years ago

      I had this dish many times and love it.

    • CampingmanNW profile image

      CampingmanNW 4 years ago

      As a child, I had a great Aunt who made this dish and I loved it. Thank you for the recipe.

    • CrazyHomemaker profile image

      CrazyHomemaker 4 years ago

      When I was in my 20's, a guy tried to pick me up by telling me he drinks kapusta juice. That was supposed to impress me. He had the nerve to ask me if I knew what kapusta was! It was an ethnic party I attended where they served kapusta! Too funny!

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      All my life growing up - my Baba lived 2 houses down from us and we were constantly at her house - she used barley in her Kapusta - love, love, loved it.

    • profile image

      Sassyred50 3 years ago

      Hi I am from Wv. We did not have much when growing up. And also was 10 kids and Dad &Mom. But we made sauerkraut and pork ribs,and you also had to have mashed potatoes,pinto beans. Corn bread. Very easy to make and cheap you could feed a lot of people. The ribs and kraut was cooked together. And I still cook it today. On New Years days it was a must to have it for good luck all year.I beat a lot of you have had this.

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 3 years ago

      Oh, I have had this dish! From my Ukrainian and part Polish grandparents many years ago.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 3 years ago from Central Florida

      I would totally like this, but would have to make it when my husband isn't home.

    • SusannaDuffy profile image

      Susanna Duffy 3 years ago from Melbourne Australia

      I must confess that I've never tried to make it myself. I buy it as a takeaway at the Polish stall at the Market.

    • Lady Lorelei profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 3 years ago from Canada

      My mom had Ukrainian ancestry on her side yet I have never heard of this recipe before. Interesting indeed.

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