ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Lovely Lovely Lemons

Updated on October 1, 2014

Lovely Lovely Lemons

This lens is all about lovely, lovely lemons!

We've got recipes, gorgeous pictures, things you can buy... and it's all lemons.

I always keep a couple handy. They are so good!

Enjoy this lens' lemony goodness!

Lemon Bars Recipe

In order for these Lemon Bars to have a nice citrus flavor, you need to use fresh lemons, not the imitation lemon juice that comes in a bottle. When choosing lemons make sure to look for ones that are fragrant with bright yellow skins. They should be firm, plump, and heavy for their size. Try to avoid lemons that have blemishes, soft spots, green spots, or are hard and wrinkled. Lemons consist of a yellow outer rind (skin) that contains the fruit's oils and perfumes. This outer rind, of varying thickness and graininess, can have either a bumpy or smooth glossy texture that contains most of the lemon's wonderful tangy flavor. Before removing the outer rind (zest) make sure you wash the lemon thoroughly (soap and water is best). The rind (zest) can be removed using a knife, vegetable peeler, grater or zester. Inside the outer rind is a white membrane (pith) that is very bitter and should not be used as it is inedible. Small vessels called 'pulp vesicles' make up the inside of the lemon and contain the pleasantly acidic lemon juice and seeds. Squeezing the lemon by hand or with a lemon squeezer or reamer releases this clear tart juice.

Shortbread Crust:

1/2 cup (1 stick) (113 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature

1/4 cup (25 grams) confectioner's (powdered or icing) sugar

1 cup (130 grams) all purpose flour

1/8 teaspoon salt

Lemon Filling:

1 cup (200 grams) granulated white sugar

2 large eggs

1/3 cup (80 ml) fresh lemon juice (approximately two large lemons)

1 tablespoons (5 grams) grated lemon zest

2 tablespoons (25 grams) all purpose flour

Garnish:

Confectioner's (powdered or icing) sugar

Lemon Bars: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (177 degrees C) and place the oven rack in the center of the oven. Butter, or spray with a non stick vegetable spray, an 8 x 8 inch (20 x 20 cm) pan.

Shortbread Crust: In the bowl of your electric mixer, or with a hand mixer, beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the flour and salt and beat until the dough just comes together. Press onto the bottom of your prepared pan and bake for about 20 minutes, or until lightly browned. Remove from oven and place on a wire rack to cool while you make the filling.

Lemon Filling: In your electric mixer, or with a hand mixer, beat the sugar and eggs until nice and smooth. Add the lemon juice and zest and stir to combine. Fold in the flour. Pour the filling over the shortbread crust and bake for about 20 minutes, or until the filling has set. Remove from oven and place on a wire rack to cool.

To serve: Cut into squares and dust with powdered sugar. These are best eaten the day they are made but can be covered and stored in the refrigerator for a day or two.

Yield: 16 - 2 inch (5 cm) bars

Lemon Zest - The yellow outer rind of the lemon that contains the fruit's flavor and perfume.

TIP: Always remove the zest first before halving and squeezing the lemon. Use a fine strainer to remove the seeds and pulp from the juice.

Lemonade
Lemonade

Lemonade Recipe

Perfect Lemonade Recipe

Ingredients

* 1 cup sugar (can reduce to 3/4 cup)

* 1 cup water (for the simple syrup)

* 1 cup lemon juice

* 3 to 4 cups cold water (to dilute)

Method

1 Make simple syrup by heating the sugar and water in a small saucepan until the sugar is dissolved completely.

2 While the sugar is dissolving, use a juicer to extract the juice from 4 to 6 lemons, enough for one cup of juice.

3 Add the juice and the sugar water to a pitcher. Add 3 to 4 cups of cold water, more or less to the desired strength. Refrigerate 30 to 40 minutes. If the lemonade is a little sweet for your taste, add a little more straight lemon juice to it.

Serve with ice, sliced lemons.

Serves 6.

Lemon Amazon Search

Search the word "lemon" on Amazon and this is what comes up!

Fresh Lemons on Amazon

Lemon Curd Recipe

Lemon Curd

Lemon Curd is a thick, soft and velvety cream that has a wonderful tart yet sweet citrus flavor. Traditionally it was used as a spread for scones but today it is used as a filling for tarts, pies, and cakes.

What I like about Lemon Curd is that it does not use exotic ingredients; just eggs, sugar, lemon juice, lemon zest, and unsalted butter. It is similar to a lemon filling or custard in that it is cooked on the stove but yet it does not contain a thickener such as cornstarch (corn flour). We are going to cook the curd in a stainless steel bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water (a double boiler). This method does take a little longer, but it helps prevent the eggs from curdling which gives the curd all those annoying little specks of cooked egg. Just make sure that the water in the bottom saucepan is 'simmering' which is defined as the point just short of a boil, that is, when bubbles start to appear. Oftentimes if you find the lemon curd is not thickening fast enough, all you need to do is increase the temperature of the simmering water. Once the lemon curd has become nice and thick (like hollandaise), remove it from the heat and strain to remove any lumps that may have formed. Then stir in the butter and lemon zest and you're done. Cover immediately with plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming and refrigerate. You will find that the lemon curd will continue to thicken as it cools. It will keep in the refrigerator for about a week. If you want to make the lemon curd lighter in texture and flavor, you can fold in a little whipped cream once the curd has been thoroughly chilled.

Now, lemon curd has to be made with fresh lemons. Do not use the imitation lemon juice that comes in a bottle. When choosing lemons look for ones that are fragrant with brightly colored oily yellow skins. The best ones are firm, plump, and heavy for their size. Don't buy lemons that have blemishes, soft spots, or are hard and wrinkled. Lemons consist of a yellow outer rind (skin) that can be of varying thickness and graininess, and can have either a bumpy or a smooth texture. This outer skin is where most of the lemon's wonderful tangy flavor is located. Before removing the outer rind (zest) make sure you wash the lemon thoroughly (soap and water is best). When removing the zest do not remove the white membrane (pith) that is underneath as it is very bitter tasting. Once you have removed the outer rind, inside the lemon are small vessels called 'pulp vesicles' which contain the pleasantly acidic lemon juice and seeds. Squeezing the lemon by hand or with a lemon squeezer or reamer releases this clear tart juice.

Lemon Curd Recipe:

3 large eggs

1/3 cup (80 ml) fresh lemon juice (2-3 lemons) (do not use the bottled lemon juice)

1 tablespoon (4 grams) finely shredded lemon zest

3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated white sugar

4 tablespoons (56 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature

Lemon Curd: In a stainless steel bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water, whisk together the eggs, sugar, and lemon juice until blended. Cook, stirring constantly (to prevent it from curdling), until the mixture becomes thick (like sour cream or a hollandaise sauce) (160 degrees F or 71 degrees C). This will take approximately 10 minutes. Remove from heat and immediately pour through a fine strainer to remove any lumps. Cut the butter into small pieces and whisk into the mixture until the butter has melted. Add the lemon zest and let cool. The lemon curd will continue to thicken as it cools. Cover immediately (so a skin doesn't form) and refrigerate for up to a week.

Makes 1 1/2 cups (360 ml).

Note: If you want a lighter lemon curd whip 1/2 cup (120 ml) of heavy whipping cream and fold into the lemon curd.

Note: Room temperature lemons provide more juice. After squeezing, strain the juice to remove any pulp. Zest is the yellow, sweet-flavored outer rind of the lemon. A zester or fine grater can be used to remove the rind. Cold lemons are much easier to grate. Grate lemons just before using as the zest will lose moisture if it sits too long.

Reader Feedback

What do you think of lemons?

They're wonderful!

They're wonderful!

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • jolou 6 years ago

      I love anything with lemon.

    • almawad 6 years ago

      the smell of lemon zest cheers me up its flavor is a must in some sweet treats ..

    • caketech 6 years ago

      I love lemons, especially in lemon meringue pie!

    • lapetitefrog 6 years ago

      lemons are pretty good! :)

    • julieannbrady 6 years ago

      You know I do think I encounter a lemon at least once a day!

    • WeirdStuff 6 years ago

      they are, they are!

    • clouda9 lm 6 years ago

      I love lemons! They add a perfect touch to recipes, plus my iced tea just would not be the same without them :)

    • David Schroeter 6 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

      Under used and too often overlooked... lemons are great with fish as a minimum and superb in a lemon meringue pie (drooling)!

    • boutiqueshops 6 years ago

      I love lemons~the fragrance, the flavor and the variety of things you can do with them. This is a GREAT page! Colorful~and includes recipes for the Lemon Bars I love! LOL

    They're awful!

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • Home Interior D 6 years ago

        Never liked lemons and not keen on most things that have a lemon flavour. Yuck! Great lens though.

      lemon sherbet
      lemon sherbet

      Lemon Sherbet Recipe

      Lemon Sherbet

      Sherbet has a long history and in ancient times was a non alcoholic sweetened fruit drink sold in the Middle East by street vendors during the summer months. Over time 'Sherbet', changed and alcohol was added to it so a new name 'sharbet' was given to the original non alcoholic fruit drink. By the 16th century the 'sharbet' had made its way to Europe where it became very popular. But different countries called it different names; in Italy the fruit drink was called 'sorbetto' (from the verb 'sorboire' meaning 'to sip'), in France it was called 'sorbet', in Spain it was called 'sorbete' and the English called it 'sherbet'. It evolved even further with the advent of making artificial ice, when sorbets/sherbets were sometimes frozen and were either served as a drink or eaten with a spoon.

      If that wasn't confusing enough, we look to America at the turn of the 19th century, where the word 'sherbet' and 'sorbet' were (and still are in some places) used interchangeably. But there are, in fact, differences between the two. 'Sorbets' come closest to the original Middle Eastern drink as they are made using fresh fruit (juices/purees), sugar, water and sometimes lemon/lime juice. 'Sherbets', on the other hand, also contain fruit juice or puree, sugar, and water but milk and/or cream, and sometimes even eggs, are added to give them a smooth and rich consistency somewhere between an ice cream and a sorbet.

      This Lemon Sherbet has a tangy lemon flavor and creamy texture which comes from using equal amounts of lemon juice, heavy whipping cream, and milk. When making this sherbet keep in mind that the tartness of the lemons can vary so you may have to adjust the amount of sugar. Be sure to taste the sherbet before you freeze it, and if necessary, add a little more sugar. This Lemon Sherbet is excellent when served as a palate cleanser between courses or it makes a lovely dessert. Serve alone or with fresh fruit.

      Lemon Sherbet Recipe:

      1/2 cup (120 ml) of lemon juice (2 - 3 large lemons)

      Zest of 1 large lemon

      1/2 cup (120 ml) heavy whipping cream

      1/2 cup (120 ml) milk

      1/3 cup (65 grams) superfine (castor) sugar (Can use regular granulated white sugar that has been processed in the food processor for about 30 seconds)

      Lemon Zest - The yellow outer rind of the lemon that contains the fruit's flavor and perfume. The rind being the outer skin of the lemon which consists of both the yellow zest and white membrane (pith).

      Lemon Sherbet: In a measuring cup, stir together the lemon juice, lemon zest, cream, milk, and sugar. Taste and add more sugar if needed. Cover and place in the refrigerator to chill for several hours.

      Once the mixture is thoroughly chilled, place in your ice cream machine and process according to the manufacturer's instructions. Once made, transfer to a chilled container and store in the freezer.

      If you do not have an ice cream machine you can 'still' freeze the sherbet. Pour the mixture into an 8 inch (20 cm) or 9 inch (23 cm) stainless steel pan (will freeze faster in stainless steel), cover with plastic wrap, and place in the freezer for about four hours. Stir the mixture every half hour, to break up any large ice crystals that have formed. When the sherbet is firm (will not be rock hard) with a consistency somewhere between an ice cream and a sorbet, transfer the sherbet to a plastic container and place in the freezer.

      I like to make the sherbet the day before serving to give the lemon flavors time to mellow.

      Makes about 4 servings.

      Lemon Tart Recipe

      Who can resist this Lemon Tart with its buttery shortbread crust, creamy lemon filling, and swirls of whipped cream? It makes the perfect ending to any meal with its tart yet sweet lemon flavor that is so light in texture.

      .

      To make this Lemon Tart we start with its shortbread crust. Most of us think of shortbread as a cookie, but it makes a great crust that is very easy to put together. Just place the flour, sugar, salt, and butter in your food processor and give them a quick whirl until you see a dough beginning to form. Then simply press the dough into your tart pan and place the pan in the freezer. We freeze the tart shell because it needs to be pre baked, only I don't want to fuss and do the usual covering the crust with parchment paper and filling it with pie weights. When you freeze the tart shell it makes this step unnecessary. Once the crust is baked, next comes the lemon filling. What I like about this filling is that it does not use exotic ingredients and its main ingredient, lemons, are available year round, at a good price, with consistently good quality. But besides using the lemon's juice and its zest, this lemon filling contains cream cheese. Unusual, yes, but it gives this filling a nice creamy texture that you could describe as almost cheesecake-like. Don't worry, though, this filling still has that wonderful tart lemony flavor that we all love. Again, as with the shortbread crust, all that is needed is a quick whirl of the ingredients in your food processor. The filling is then poured into the pre baked tart shell and baked until the filling is just set. Now, you will notice that I have topped the Lemon Tart with a layer of whipped cream. This is done both to temper the tartness of the lemon filling and to give a nice presentation, especially if you take the time to pipe the cream with a decorative tip.

      If you serve this tart the day it is made the crust will be crisp and the lemon flavor quite refreshing. After it has been stored in the refrigerator overnight you will notice that both the crust has softened as has the tart flavor of the lemon filling. Excellent either way.

      CRUST:

      1 cup (140 grams) all purpose flour

      1/3 cup (36 grams) confectioners (powdered or icing) sugar

      1/8 teaspoon salt

      1/2 cup (114 grams) cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces

      FILLING:

      5 ounces (140 grams) cream cheese, room temperature.

      1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated white sugar

      1/2 cup (120 ml) fresh lemon juice (approximately two large lemons)

      2 large eggs

      1 tablespoon grated lemon zest

      TOPPING:

      1/2 cup (120 ml) heavy whipping cream

      1 tablespoon confectioners (powdered or icing) sugar

      Grease with butter, or a cooking spray, an 8 inch (20 cm) or 9 inch (23 cm) tart pan with a removable bottom. Set aside.

      FOR CRUST: In your food processor, place the flour, sugar, and salt and process to combine. Add the butter and pulse until the pastry starts to come together and form clumps. Place the pastry in the prepared tart pan and, using your fingertips, evenly press the pastry onto the bottom and up the sides of the pan. (Can use the back of a spoon to smooth the surface of the pastry.) Pierce the bottom of the crust with the tines of a fork. (This will prevent the pastry crust from puffing up while it bakes.) Cover and place the pastry crust in the freezer for 15 minutes to chill. (This will help prevent the crust from shrinking while it bakes.)

      Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C) and place rack in center of oven.

      When the pastry is completely chilled, place the tart pan on a larger baking pan and bake until the crust is golden brown, about 13 - 15 minutes. Remove from oven and place on a wire rack to cool while you make the filling.

      Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees (177 degrees C).

      FOR FILLING: In a food processor or electric mixer place the cream cheese and process until smooth. Add sugar and process until incorporated. Add eggs, one at a time, and process until thoroughly combined. Add remaining ingredients and process until well blended and smooth. Pour filling into pre baked tart shell and bake for approximately 25 - 30 minutes or until filling is set. Transfer tart to a wire rack to cool and then cover and refrigerate until well chilled, at least an hour.

      TOPPING: Put mixing bowl and whisk in the freezer for 15 minutes. Beat the whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff peaks form. Transfer the whipped cream to a pastry bag fitted with star tip (#4B), and pipe stars over the entire surface of the tart.

      Refrigerate until serving time.

      Lemon Zest - The yellow outer rind of the lemon that contains the fruit's flavor and perfume.

      Lemon Meringue Tart Recipe

      So what exactly is the difference between a Lemon Meringue Tart and a Lemon Meringue Pie besides the obvious difference that one uses a tart pan and the other a pie plate? Well, for one thing a Lemon Meringue Pie uses a lemon filling (or custard) which contains little or no butter and uses cornstarch (corn flour) or flour for thickening. A Lemon Meringue Tart, on the other hand, is filled with lemon curd which does not contain cornstarch or flour and contains more lemon juice and zest than the Lemon Meringue Pie's filling so it has a sharper lemon flavor. It also contains butter which makes the curd's texture smoother and creamier.

      Nevertheless, they are both delicious and both have that same pitfall, the problem of a 'weeping' meringue; that is, beads of moisture that form between the baked meringue and the filling, causing the meringue to slip away from the filling. For help on this subject I consulted both Carole Walter's 'Great Pies and Tarts' and Jane Grigson's 'Fruit Book' and their solution seems to be that the lemon filling needs to be 'hot', not cold, when spreading on the unbaked meringue. I have found that having the filling hot, along with gently pressing down on the meringue to remove any air pockets, does, in fact, solve the 'weeping' problem. It is also a good idea not to over whip the egg whites as this can be another cause of weeping. Once the tart is removed from the oven, place it on a wire rack to cool, away from any drafts. This tart is at its very best the day it is made although leftovers can be covered and refrigerated.

      Sweet Pastry Crust:

      1 1/2 cups (210 grams) all purpose flour

      1/8 teaspoon salt

      1/2 cup (113 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature

      1/4 cup (50 grams) granulated white sugar

      1 large egg, lightly beaten

      Lemon Curd:

      3 large eggs

      1/3 cup (80 ml) fresh lemon juice (2-3 lemons) (do not use the bottled lemon juice)

      3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated white sugar

      4 tablespoons (56 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature and cut into small pieces

      1 tablespoon (4 grams) lemon zest

      Meringue:

      4 large egg whites

      1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons (130 grams) white granulated sugar

      1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar

      Lemon Zest - The yellow outer rind of the lemon that contains the fruit's flavor and perfume. The rind being the outer skin of the lemon which consists of both the yellow zest and white membrane (pith).

      Sweet Pastry Crust: In a separate bowl, sift or whisk together the flour and salt. Set aside. Place the butter in your mixer and beat until softened. Add sugar and beat until light and fluffy. Gradually add the beaten egg, beating just until incorporated. Don't over mix or the butter will separate and lighten in color. Add flour mixture all at once and mix just until it forms a ball. Don't overwork or pastry will be hard when baked.

      Flatten dough into disk, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for about 30 minutes or until firm.

      Have ready an 8 - 9 inch (20 - 23 cm) tart pan with removable bottom. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the pastry into an 11 - 12 inch (28 - 30 cm) circle that is about 1/8 inch (3 mm) thick. To prevent the pastry from sticking to the counter and to ensure uniform thickness, keep lifting up and turning the pastry a quarter turn as you roll (always roll from the center of the pastry outwards to get uniform thickness). To make sure it is the right size, take your tart pan, flip it over, and place it on the rolled out pastry. The pastry should be about an inch larger than pan.

      When the pastry is rolled to the desired size, lightly roll pastry around your rolling pin, dusting off any excess flour as you roll. Unroll onto top of tart pan. Never pull pastry or you will get shrinkage (shrinkage is caused by too much pulling of the pastry when placing it in the pan). Gently lay in pan and with a small floured piece of pastry, lightly press pastry into bottom and up sides of pan. Roll your rolling pin over top of pan to get rid of excess pastry. With a thumb up movement, again press dough into pan. Roll rolling pin over top again to get rid of any extra pastry. Prick bottom of dough (this will prevent the dough from puffing up as it bakes). Cover and refrigerate for about 20 minutes to chill the butter and to rest the gluten in the flour.

      Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (205 degrees C) and place rack in center of oven. Line unbaked pastry shell with parchment paper or aluminum foil. Fill tart pan with pie weights, rice or beans, making sure the weights are to the top of the pan and evenly distributed over the entire surface. Bake the crust for 20 to 25 minutes or until the crust is dry and lightly golden brown.

      For Lemon Curd: While the crust is baking make the Lemon Curd. In a stainless steel bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water, whisk together the eggs, sugar, and lemon juice until blended. Cook, whisking constantly (to prevent it from curdling), until the mixture becomes pale in color and quite thick (like a hollandaise sauce or sour cream) (160 degrees F or 71 degrees C on a thermometer). This will take about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and immediately pour through a fine strainer to remove any lumps. Cut the butter into small pieces and whisk into the mixture until the butter has melted. Add the lemon zest. Immediately pour the lemon curd into the baked crust and smooth the top.

      Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F (177 degrees C). Bake the tart for about 10 minutes or until the lemon curd is firm but still a little wobbly in the center. Do not let it brown or burn.

      For Meringue: In a clean bowl of your electric mixer, with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites until foamy. Add the cream of tartar and continue beating until soft peaks form. Gradually add the sugar and continue to whip until stiff peaks form.

      Using a spoon, place dollops of the meringue over the entire surface of the hot lemon curd, starting at the outside edge of the tart. (Make sure the meringue comes right up to the crust and there are no gaps between the crust and the lemon curd.) Then, with the back of your spoon, gently press down on the meringue to get rid of any air pockets and to make sure all the lemon curd is covered with the meringue. If desired, swirl the meringue making a few decorative peaks. Return the tart to the oven and bake for about 10 to 15 minutes or until the meringue has nicely browned.

      Remove from oven and place on a wire rack to cool, away from any drafts. When cool, serve or else cover and refrigerate.

      Serves 6 - 8

      Note: Leftover pastry can be used to make Sables (French Butter Cookies)

      TIPS:

      Always remove the zest first before halving and squeezing the lemon.

      Thin, smooth skinned lemons at room temperature yield the most juice.

      Thick, bumpy textured cold lemons give the maximum amount of zest.

      Use a fine strainer to remove the seeds and pulp from the juice.

      Lovely Lovely Lemons - Reader Feedback

        0 of 8192 characters used
        Post Comment

        • emmajowebster profile image

          emmajowebster 5 years ago

          receipe ideas are great!

        • Demaw profile image

          Demaw 6 years ago

          Lemon is one of my favorite fruits. I make lemon aid, use it in tea, use in the bath, on the face, use the zest, the rind is good if you are making home made cleaning products. I even love lemon ice cream.

        • almawad profile image

          almawad 6 years ago

          the essential oil of lemon zest cheers one up on a gloomy day - eat it or smell it ... its fume kills viruses and bacteria ... what a good idea for a lens !

        • bconnor11 profile image

          bconnor11 6 years ago

          Really nice lens. I might try some of these recipes. I love the pictures!

        • unstucktheory profile image

          unstucktheory 6 years ago

          My one year old has a thing for lemons at the moment, he'll take a big bite of one just like it's an orange. Makes my lips pucker just thinking of it! He munches away quite happily though.

        • caketech profile image

          caketech 6 years ago

          That lemon meringue tart looks really good, too!

        • GonnaFly profile image

          Jeanette 6 years ago from Australia

          What a wonderful load of lemony ideas :-) Our lemon tree is overflowing with lemons at the moment so this will come in handy!

        • profile image

          termit_bronx 6 years ago

          I like the taste of lemon. Every day I drink lemon juice mixed with water, lemon add alkalinity to it.

        • Dianne Loomos profile image

          Dianne Loomos 6 years ago

          I love lemon flavored things.

        • profile image

          julieannbrady 6 years ago

          Wow! Too bad there isn't a really lemony theme for this page -- hey, maybe the highlighter theme might work? I love lemons as much as I love the color yellow.

        • myraggededge profile image

          myraggededge 6 years ago

          What a gorgeous lens! I love lemons and I can almost smell them wafting from your page. Blessed by a Squid angel :-)

        • JohannDog profile image

          Johann The Dog 6 years ago from Northeast Georgia

          Lemons are pawsome!!! Mum's been using them lately to sooth the itches she gets taking us hiking!

        • clouda9 lm profile image

          clouda9 lm 6 years ago

          Pucker Up Delish! Love this lens all about lemons!

        • drs2biz lm profile image

          David Schroeter 6 years ago from St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

          Feeling very hungry after reading this fabulous lens. Too often we forget how versatile the common old lemon can be!

        • profile image

          bubblybubble 7 years ago

          Cool lens! Well done :)