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Persimmon Bread Recipe & Facts About Persimmons

Updated on March 28, 2012
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A little background

My family moved from Southern California to Fresno, California in the mid-1990's. Fresno is the hub of the Central Valley of California, where many of our nation's fruits and vegetables are grown. My family owns and manages a persimmon orchard and my parents live on the main farm property to this day. In fact, it's where I got married and had a big traditional Cambodian wedding. We grow, pack, and sell the fruit to wholesalers and some chain supermarkets. Harvest time is in the fall, usually October-December. I often have leftover fruit towards the end of the season, which is perfect for making persimmon nut bread during the holidays. Persimmon bread is similar to banana bread or gingerbread but with yummy bits of persimmon baked right in. I love making it, and I especially love eating it! I hope you get to try it sometime.

Loaf of persimmon nut bread (and cupcakes). Sorry, I don't have a picture of a sliced piece, which is studded with nuts and bits of yummy persimmon!
Loaf of persimmon nut bread (and cupcakes). Sorry, I don't have a picture of a sliced piece, which is studded with nuts and bits of yummy persimmon!

Persimmon Nut Bread Recipe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 cup persimmon puree* (or 3/4 cup puree + 1/4 cup finely diced persimmon)
  • 1/2 cup white granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar (light or golden)
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup (4 tablespoons) softened butter
  • 1 cup chopped nuts

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Sift the first 6 ingredients together in a small bowl (the dry mix).
  2. In a large bowl, mix together the persimmon, sugars, eggs and milk (the wet mix).
  3. Add the dry ingredients and softened butter to the wet mix. Mix until well blended.
  4. Stir in nuts. Spread in a well-greased loaf pan (9x5x3 inch). Optionally, sprinkle additional nuts on top of the batter in the pan.
  5. Bake at 350 degrees for 45-55 minutes or until a wooden skewer comes out clean

Yields: About 10 thick slices. This bread freezes well.

*Persimmon puree can be made by food processing, blending, or mashing 2-3 medium-sized fresh ripe persimmons, any variety. When using the firm kind (fuyu), I like to dice one of the fruits and add that in with the pureed fruit. This adds texture and flavor to the bread. Alternatively, you can use the cone-shaped kind (hachiya), which is already a soft, pulpy, almost liquid form by the time it's ripe enough to eat.

Note: The bread is not that sweet, and has a rich, cinnamon taste. If desired, you could top with fresh whipped cream or frosting to make it more like a dessert. Otherwise, it's good by itself, or warmed up and eaten while enjoying a cup of coffee. I hope you like it!

Two Main Varieties - Hachiya & Fuyu

Hachiya: Its natural sweetness when ripe lends itself well to being frozen and becoming a very easy and sweet sorbet! No sugar needed.
Hachiya: Its natural sweetness when ripe lends itself well to being frozen and becoming a very easy and sweet sorbet! No sugar needed. | Source
A ripe persimmon is bright to dark orange in color. Fuyus can be eaten when hard like an apple.
A ripe persimmon is bright to dark orange in color. Fuyus can be eaten when hard like an apple. | Source
Persimmon on the tree, ready to be picked
Persimmon on the tree, ready to be picked | Source
Dried persimmon
Dried persimmon | Source

How to Eat & Use Persimmons

Besides being a fresh, fat-free and full of fiber fruit, persimmons have great health properties that set them apart from other fruits. They're full of beta-carotene, folic acid, B-vitamins, vitamin C, antioxidants, essential minerals and phytonutrients. If steeped in hot water to drink as a tea, persimmons can help with diarrhea. However, if eaten in too high a quantity, persimmons can cause constipation and a condition called a "bezoar" which is an obstruction in your stomach. Don't be nervous though, as these cases are a medical oddity; one would have to eat pounds of unripened, unpeeled fruit, for many weeks, to achieve this condition! (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persimmon).

Do not make the mistake of eating the cone-shaped "hachiya" persimmons when they're still firm. They are full of tannins, and therefore, taste very astringent, chalky, and otherwise unpleasant when not yet ripe. When ripe, a hachiya persimmon is very soft, the color is a reddish orange and the skin should be peeled or scored halfway, and the fruit should be scooped out and eaten with a spoon. If eaten when properly ripe, the flesh is extremely sweet and juicy.

"Fuyu" persimmons, on the other hand, SHOULD be eaten when firm, like a good apple. Its shape is like a squat tomato but it looks and feels more like a miniature orange pumpkin with smooth skin. Color can range from yellow to orange but a ripe fuyu persimmon is usually a bright orange color (no longer yellow or green). It tastes best when peeled and quartered or sliced, although the skin can be eaten if chosen. It should taste like a crunchy, sweet apple, with hints of cinnamon. In either case, the seeds are soft and can be eaten right along with the fruit part.

Other than baked goods like bread (above), pudding, cake, tarts, and cookies, persimmons can be used in salads, sauces, sorbets, chutneys, and jam, to give a few examples. Since they're available in the fall, how about using fresh diced persimmons in your homemade cranberry sauce to eat with turkey? Yummy. My family also likes to slice and dehydrate persimmons to make dried persimmon (pictured above), similar to dried apple, which is a naturally sweet snack that can be enjoyed year round. There is another kind of dried persimmon, which is dried whole and develops a white, powdery sugar coating. This kind is available seasonally and also frozen at Asian markets.

For my son's fruit and traditional rice cake filled birthday table (middle row, from left to right): pomegranates, asian pears, fuyu persimmons, apples (fall fruits).
For my son's fruit and traditional rice cake filled birthday table (middle row, from left to right): pomegranates, asian pears, fuyu persimmons, apples (fall fruits).
My son holding a very small hachiya persimmon and me handing him a mini fuyu persimmon.
My son holding a very small hachiya persimmon and me handing him a mini fuyu persimmon.
Would you like a persimmon?
Would you like a persimmon?

Have I changed your mind about persimmons?

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Tell me what you think

I hope you get a chance to try my persimmon bread recipe or otherwise eat and enjoy persimmons. It may sound self-promoting, since my family grows and sells this fruit, but I think persimmons get a bad rap, and I'd rather people know the basic facts about them before passing judgment.

If you've tried this recipe, let me know what you think. I love it, but of course, everyone's taste is different. I appreciate your comments or tips!

If you have a persimmon recipe of your own...write a hub and I'll link it, or just let me know in the comments or email me and I may include it in this hub later. I will try to dig up more family photos of the orchard and maybe our packing warehouse, so check back here later. Definitely check back here in the fall when it's harvest time!

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    • edelhaus profile image

      edelhaus 5 years ago from Munich, Germany

      The first time we had persimmons was while on a trip to Mallorca and my son and I just fell in love. My husband, being European, was already familiar with the lovely fruit. They have a delicious, creamy vanilla flavor which is wonderful in salads. I especailly like them in combination with other fall fruits like pomegranates in a salad with grilled chicken breast. Not only does the salad look gorgeous with all the wonderful pops of color, but the combinations of flavors like sweet, salty and tart taste fantastic together. I never thought about making persimmon bread though. I will definitely give that a try.

    • sunbun143 profile image
      Author

      sunbun143 5 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

      I love pomegranates too! My family grows some of those tart red fruits too but mainly just persimmons. Thank you for reading and commenting. A grilled chicken salad with fresh fruits sounds lovely!

    • urmilashukla23 profile image

      Urmila 5 years ago from Rancho Cucamonga,CA, USA

      Never heard of this recipe. Definitely going to try it. Bookmarked and shared. Useful and voted up

    • johnreyartiaga49 profile image

      johnreyartiaga49 5 years ago from philippines

      I never taste this recipe... if it is well, please include its procedure in making it...

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image

      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      I've never eater persimmons, but after reading your hub, I think I've been missing something wonderful! We just planted some young persimmon trees in our yard, so one day we should have our own fruit. I'm looking forward to trying out some of your suggestions!

      Your photographs are beautiful! Voted up across the board.

    • sunbun143 profile image
      Author

      sunbun143 5 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

      Thank you for your kind comments and for voting up! I always want to spread the word on this strange orange fruit...a lot of people either don't know anything about it or have misconceptions about it (maybe they ate it when not ripe yet?)...And I love baking. So this recipe combines two things very important to me.

    • alocsin profile image

      alocsin 5 years ago from Orange County, CA

      I didn't even know you could turn persimmons into bread, but anything with nuts is something I'd like. The pics of your son with the persimmon are great. Voting this Up and Useful.

    • sunbun143 profile image
      Author

      sunbun143 5 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

      Thanks for reading...you would definitely like adding the extra nuts on top of the batter before baking then...just be sure to chop them beforehand or else they stick up too much and tend to burn.

    • LetitiaFT profile image

      LetitiaFT 4 years ago from Paris via California

      My father's family used to grow persimmons on their farm when he was little so he always bought them for my sister and I when we were children. They're so delicious fresh and ripe that they usually don't last long enough for me to make anything out of them, but this recipe is tempting enough that I'll put some aside for it when they're in season. I'd never thought to dry any either, I'll keep that in mind. Thanks for the rundown on the different kinds of persimmons, too.

    • cardelean profile image

      cardelean 4 years ago from Michigan

      They sound delicious! I'm so glad that you shared this with me sunbun143! I will have to get my hands on some now and give this bread a try.

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      Ohhh! I've haven't thought of persimmons in a while, but persimmon bread nut is absolutely wonderful. Thank you for reminding me to look for them at the store!

    • sunbun143 profile image
      Author

      sunbun143 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

      Thank you for commenting everybody! It's officially harvest time and for me, that means the start of the holidays and holiday baking. Hope you try this recipe or experiment with persimmons....let me know how it goes! Happy Holidays!

    • profile image

      majohnson 17 months ago

      Can you make persimmon pudding with fuyu persimmons like I make with old timey persimmons

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